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1.
Int J STD AIDS ; 33(4): 404-415, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883424

ABSTRACT

A large number of countries are being confronted with twin epidemics of increasing STI incidence and antimicrobial resistance (AMR). This has led to calls to intensify STI screening of high STI prevalence populations. The available evidence suggests that this will have little impact on STI prevalence but a significant deleterious effect on AMR. We suggest that this call to intensify STI screening is one of the several errors that stem from the way that the STI-field has been dominated by a biomedical individualistic conceptual framework. This framework views STIs as obligate pathogens that can and should be eradicated by intensive seek-and-destroy activities. We evaluate five types of evidence that suggest that a multi-level, socio-ecological framework would provide a more accurate portrayal of the important determinants of STI prevalence and AMR spread. By incorporating concepts such as limiting STI screening to scenarios with clear evidence of net-benefit and considering 'antimicrobial footprint' thresholds, this framework would be more likely to result in a better balance between targeting STI prevalence whilst minimizing the risk of AMR emerging.


Subject(s)
Gonorrhea , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Humans , Mass Screening , Prevalence , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis
2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 519, 2022 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879225

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) are two very important diseases. However, relevant researches about how COVID-19 pandemic has impacted on the epidemiological trend of STDs are limited in China. This study aimed to analyze the impact of COVID-19 on STDs in China and proposed relevant recommendations to be used in bettering health. METHODS: The incidence of HIV infection, syphilis and gonorrhea in China from 2008 to 2020 were collected. Grey Model (1,1) were established to predict the incidence of STDs with the incidence data of these three STDs from 2013 to 2018 considering the impact of policies in China, respectively. We then calculated the predictive incidence of each STD in 2019, 2020 and 2021 by the established Model. And we estimated the extent of the impact of COVID-19 on the epidemiological changes of STDs by analyzing the difference between the absolute percentage error (APE) of the predictive incidence and actual rate in 2019 and 2020. RESULTS: The incidence of HIV infection and syphilis showed a trend of increase from 2008 to 2019 in China, but that for gonorrhea was fluctuant. Of note, the incidence of these three STDs decreased significantly in 2020 compared with that in 2019. The APE of HIV infection, syphilis and gonorrhea in 2020 (20.54%, 15.45% and 60.88%) were about 7 times, 4 times and 2 times of that in 2019 (2.94%, 4.07% and 30.41%). The incidence of HIV infection, syphilis and gonorrhea would be 5.77/100,000, 39.64/100,000 and 13.19/100,000 in 2021 based on our model. CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiological trend of STDs in China was significant influenced by COVID-19 pandemic. It is important to balance the control of COVID-19 and timely management of STDs during the COVID-19 epidemic to prevent or reduce the poor outcome among COVID-19 patients with STDs. New management strategies on STDs, such as leveraging social media, online medical care, rapid self-testing, timely diagnosis and treatment guarantee and balance of medical resources for STDs management should be adapted in the context of the long-term effects of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gonorrhea , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Syphilis , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/prevention & control , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Syphilis/epidemiology , Syphilis/prevention & control
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862802

ABSTRACT

Background: While a large body of evidence indicates changes in alcohol and other drug use among young people as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a lack of evidence around changes in sexual practices and how the pandemic may be impacting the potential spread of blood-borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections (BBVs/STIs). Most of what we know about sex during COVID-19 lockdowns is largely based on solitary sexual practices, which may not answer the critical question around how the pandemic may be shaping sexual practices among young people. Against this backdrop, this study explored how the COVID-19 pandemic may be shaping BBVs/STIs risk and protective practices among a sample of onshore African and Asian international students in Sydney, Australia. Methods: This phenomenological qualitative study involved semi-structured telephone and face-to-face interviews with 16 international university students in Sydney, between September 2020-March 2021. Generated data were coded using NVivo and analysis was guided by reflexive thematic analysis. Results: Participants reported elevated mental health distress because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some participants reported engaging in casual sexual hook-ups as a strategy to mitigate the mental health distress they were experiencing. Some of these sexual hook-ups were condomless partly because COVID-related disruptions impacted condom accessibility. Additionally, the preventive practices of some participants who were sexually active during the lockdowns were focused on preventing COVID-19, while the risk of BBVs/STIs were downplayed. Conclusions: This study indicates a need for a comprehensive public health response to the evolving and near-endemic COVID-19 situation. Such a comprehensive approach should focus on empowering young people to prevent both SARS-CoV-2 and BBVs/STIs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Adolescent , Africa South of the Sahara , Blood-Borne Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Students
6.
Front Immunol ; 13: 875236, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834410

ABSTRACT

A variety of methods have been explored to increase delivery efficiencies for DNA vaccine. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines has not been satisfactorily improved. Unlike most of the previous attempts, we provided evidence suggesting that changing the injection site successively (successively site-translocated inoculation, SSTI) could significantly enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in a previous study. To simplify the strategy and to evaluate its impact on candidate SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, we immunized mice with either a SARS-CoV-2 spike-based DNA vaccine or a spike protein subunit vaccine via three different inoculation strategies. Our data demonstrated that S protein specific antibody responses elicited by the DNA vaccine or the protein subunit vaccine showed no significant difference among different inoculation strategies. Of interest, compared with the conventional site fixed inoculation (SFI), both successive site-translocating inoculation (SSTI) and the simplified translocating inoculation (STI) strategy improved specific T cell responses elicited by the DNA vaccine. More specifically, the SSTI strategy significantly improved both the monofunctional (IFN-γ+IL-2-TNF-α-CD8+) and the multifunctional (IFN-γ+IL-2-TNF-α+CD8+, IFN-γ+IL-2-TNF-α+CD4+, IFN-γ+IL-2+TNF-α+CD4+) T cell responses, while the simplified translocating inoculation (STI) strategy significantly improved the multifunctional CD8+ (IFN-γ+IL-2-TNF-α+CD8+, IFN-γ+IL-2+TNF-α+CD8+) and CD4+ (IFN-γ+IL-2-TNF-α+CD4+, IFN-γ+IL-2+TNF-α+CD4+) T cell responses. The current study confirmed that changing the site of intra muscular injection can significantly improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Vaccines, DNA , Animals , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Interleukin-2 , Mice , Protein Subunits , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
7.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 8(5): e30070, 2022 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834135

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has created disruptions in HIV prevention and sexual health services for men who have sex with men (MSM). OBJECTIVE: This study compared HIV testing utilization in 3 different reference periods (period 1: before the COVID-19 outbreak, November 2019-January 2020; period 2: after the outbreak, February-April 2020; and period 3: after the pandemic was under initial control, May-July 2020). Factors associated with HIV testing utilization after the COVID-19 outbreak (combined periods 2 and 3) were also investigated. METHODS: Participants were MSM aged ≥18 years living in Shenzhen, China. Those self-reporting as HIV positive were excluded. A total of 595 participants recruited through multiple sources completed a self-administered online survey during August-September 2020. HIV testing utilization after the COVID-19 outbreak was the dependent variable, and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted. RESULTS: HIV testing utilization was significantly lower in period 2 than in period 1 (n=262 vs 363, 44.0% vs 61.0%, P<.001). However, HIV testing utilization was not significantly higher in period 3 than in period 2 (n=277 vs 262, 46.6% vs 44.0%, P=.21). The prevalence of HIV testing utilization after the COVID-19 outbreak was seen in 331 (55.6%) participants. After adjusting for significant background characteristics, condomless anal intercourse (CAI) with regular male sex partners (RPs; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.15, 95% CI 1.29-3.57) and sexualized drug use (SDU; AOR 2.94, 95% CI 1.41-6.06) both before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, CAI with RPs (AOR 2.07, 95% CI 1.06-4.07) and nonregular male sex partners (NRPs; AOR 3.57, 95%CI: 1.43-8.89) only after the COVID-19 outbreak was positively associated with the dependent variable. Regarding HIV prevention service utilization, HIV testing utilization before the COVID-19 outbreak (AOR 10.75, 95% CI 7.22-16.02) and the use of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing (AOR 7.02, 95% CI 4.10-12.02), other HIV/STI prevention (AOR 3.15, 95% CI 2.16-4.60), and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP; AOR 3.58, 95% CI 1.54-8.34) after the COVID-19 outbreak were associated with higher HIV testing utilization. The current perceived risk of HIV infection was higher than that before the COVID-19 outbreak (AOR 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.30), and perceived COVID-19 preventive measures taken by HIV testing service providers to be effective (AOR 1.52, 95% CI 1.29-1.78) and perceived higher behavioral control to undergo HIV testing (AOR 1.18, 95% CI 1.00-1.40) were positively associated with HIV testing utilization. Concerns about COVID-19 infection during HIV testing (AOR 0.78, 95% CI 0.68-0.89), avoiding crowded places (AOR 0.68, 95% CI 0.48-0.98), and HIV testing service providers reducing their working hours (AOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.48-0.98) were negatively associated with the dependent variable. CONCLUSIONS: HIV testing utilization among Chinese MSM declined after the COVID-19 outbreak and did not increase after the pandemic was under initial control. Removing structural barriers to accessing HIV testing caused by COVID-19, modifying perceptions related to HIV testing, and making use of HIV self-testing (HIVST) might be useful strategies to improve HIV testing among MSM during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , HIV Testing , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
8.
AIDS ; 36(6): 829-838, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831560

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemics on the prevention and care for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections at a major reference centre providing preventive and clinical services in Catalonia, Spain. DESIGN: We retrospectively compared anonymized clinical and laboratory data from March to December 2020 vs. 2019. METHODS: Monthly clinical data on HIV preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis users and on adults with HIV infection were retrieved from the administrative hospital database. Monthly tests for HIV, hepatitis B and C, Treponema pallidum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae,and Chlamydia trachomatis, and plasma lipids and glucose were recovered from the laboratory database. RESULTS: There were less (↓28%, P  = 0.003) but more advanced (mean CD4+ cells/µl 305 vs. 370, P  < 0.001) HIV infections and more gonorrhoea (↑39%, P  < 0.001) and chlamydia (↑37%, P  < 0.001) infections in 2020 vs. 2019. In people with HIV, rates of HIV RNA less than 50 copies/ml remained stable (11 vs. 11%, P  = 0.147) despite less scheduled visits (↓25%, P  < 0.001). However, they had less antiretroviral prescription changes (↓10%, P  = 0.018), worse plasma lipids [mean total cholesterol 190 vs. 185 mg/dl, P  < 0.001;mean low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 114 vs. 110 mg/dl, P  < 0.001; mean triglycerides 136 vs. 125 mg/dl, P  < 0.001; mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol 47 vs. 48 mg/dl, P  = 006], and an excess of mortality (↑264%, P  = 0.006) due in great part not only to COVID-19 but also to other causes. CONCLUSION: In our setting, COVID-19 epidemics was associated with an increase in some prevalent sexually transmitted infections, with less but more advanced HIV infections, and with worse nonvirologic healthcare outcomes and higher mortality in people living with HIV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chlamydia Infections , Epidemics , Gonorrhea , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Cholesterol , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/prevention & control , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Lipids , Retrospective Studies , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
9.
Nurse Pract ; 47(4): 10-18, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816269

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are common and costly, with about 26 million STIs occurring each year in the US. Guidelines for the prevention and management of STIs are updated periodically. In 2021, the CDC updated its guidelines for the treatment of STIs. This article provides information on the most recent updates on managing STIs to help advanced practice nurses in their practice.


Subject(s)
Advanced Practice Nursing , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
11.
Sex Transm Dis ; 49(7): 490-496, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806731

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, disruptions were anticipated in the US health care system for routine preventive and other nonemergency care, including sexually transmitted infection care. METHODS: Using a large national laboratory data set, we assessed the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the weekly numbers and percent positivity of chlamydia and gonorrhea tests ordered from the 5th week of 2019 to the 52nd week of 2020 in the United States. We compared weekly 2020 values for test volume, percent positive, and number of positives with the same week in 2019. We also examined the potential impact of stay-at-home orders for the month of April 2020. RESULTS: Immediately after the declaration of a national emergency for COVID-19 (week 11, 2020), the weekly number of gonorrhea and chlamydia tests steeply decreased. Tests then rebounded toward the 2019 pre-COVID-19 level beginning the 15th week of 2020. The weekly percent positive of chlamydia and gonorrhea remained consistently higher in 2020. In April 2020, the overall number of chlamydia tests was reduced by 53.0% (54.1% in states with stay-at-home orders vs. 45.5% in states without stay-at-home orders), whereas the percent positive of chlamydia and gonorrhea tests increased by 23.5% and 79.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: To limit the impact of the pandemic on control of chlamydia and gonorrhea, public health officials and health care providers can assess measures put in place during the pandemic and develop new interventions to enable care for sexually transmitted infections to be delivered under pandemic and other emergency conditions. The assessment like this study is continuously needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chlamydia Infections , Gonorrhea , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/diagnosis , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/prevention & control , Chlamydia trachomatis , Gonorrhea/diagnosis , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Gonorrhea/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
12.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(4): 427-434, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND HYPOTHESIS: Two cohorts face high mortality after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI): females and patients with in-hospital STEMI. The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in ischemic times and outcomes of in-hospital STEMI patients. METHODS: Consecutive STEMI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were prospectively recruited from 30 hospitals into the Victorian Cardiac Outcomes Registry (2013-2018). Sex discrepancies within in-hospital STEMIs were compared with out-of-hospital STEMIs. The primary endpoint was 12-month all-cause mortality. Secondary endpoints included symptom-to-device (STD) time and 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). To investigate the relationship between sex and 12-month mortality for in-hospital versus out-of-hospital STEMIs, an interaction analysis was included in the multivariable models. RESULTS: A total of 7493 STEMI patients underwent PCI of which 494 (6.6%) occurred in-hospital. In-hospital versus out-of-hospital STEMIs comprised 31.9% and 19.9% females, respectively. Female in-hospital STEMIs were older (69.5 vs. 65.9 years, p = .003) with longer adjusted geometric mean STD times (104.6 vs. 94.3 min, p < .001) than men. Female versus male in-hospital STEMIs had no difference in 12-month mortality (27.1% vs. 20.3%, p = .92) and MACE (22.8% vs. 19.3%, p = .87). Female sex was not independently associated with 12-month mortality for in-hospital STEMIs which was consistent across the STEMI cohort (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 0.94-1.70, p = .13). CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital STEMIs are more frequent in females relative to out-of-hospital STEMIs. Despite already being under medical care, females with in-hospital STEMIs experienced a 10-min mean excess in STD time compared with males, after adjustment for confounders. Adjusted 12-month mortality and MACE were similar to males.


Subject(s)
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Sex Characteristics , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/etiology , Treatment Outcome
14.
Front Public Health ; 9: 692461, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775813

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual habits, and behavior among students of medical and nonmedical students in Serbia. Methodology: The cross-sectional study of 1,273 university students of four undergraduate institutions in Serbia, two of medical and two of nonmedical orientation. A standardized questionnaire, prepared in line with the questionnaire of the European health research-the second wave (European Health Interview Survey-EHIS wave 2), according to defined internationally accepted indicators, was used as a survey instrument. Results: Statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) between medical and nonmedical student groups was determined for the following parameters: naming four of five STIs (29.1 vs. 13.4%), knowledge about vaccines against some STIs (26.0 vs. 17.0%), relationship between HPV infection and cervical malignancy (48.2 vs. 16.7%) engaged in the sexual relations (87.9 vs. 76.4%), never used a condom (15.2 vs. 10.4%), underwent gynecological or urological examination (66.7 vs. 44.1%), and tested to one of STIs (10.5 vs. 4.9%). Conclusion: Both student groups have limited knowledge on possible consequences that risky sexual behavior has for reproductive health. Promotion of knowledge about STIs, awareness of all complications, and consequences of these infections certainly affect the reduction of risky behavior.


Subject(s)
Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Habits , Humans , Serbia , Sexual Behavior , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Students , Universities
15.
J Biotechnol ; 349: 53-64, 2022 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757476

ABSTRACT

In recent years, acceleration of development timelines has become a major focus within the biopharmaceutical industry to bring innovative therapies faster to patients. However, in order to address a high unmet medical need even faster further acceleration potential has to be identified to transform "speed-to-clinic" concepts into "warp-speed" development programs. Recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines are the predominant expression system for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and are routinely generated by random transgene integration (RTI) of the genetic information into the host cell genome. This process, however, exhibits considerable challenges such as the requirement for a time-consuming clone screening process to identify a suitable clonally derived manufacturing cell line. Hence, RTI represents an error prone and tedious method leading to long development timelines until availability of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-grade drug substance (DS). Transposase-mediated semi-targeted transgene integration (STI) has been recently identified as a promising alternative to RTI as it allows for a more rapid generation of high-performing and stable production cell lines. In this report, we demonstrate how a STI technology was leveraged to develop a very robust DS manufacturing process based on a stable pool cell line at unprecedented pace. Application of the novel strategy resulted in the manufacturing of GMP-grade DS at 2,000 L scale in less than three months paving the way for a start of Phase I clinical trials only six months after transfection. Finally, using a clonally derived production cell line, which was established from the parental stable pool, we were able to successfully implement a process with an increased mAb titer of up to 5 g per liter at the envisioned commercial scale (12,000 L) within eight months.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Acceleration , Animals , CHO Cells , Cricetinae , Cricetulus , Humans , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/drug therapy , Transposases
16.
Sex Transm Dis ; 49(4): e61-e63, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752215

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted sexually transmitted disease (STD) services. Of 59 US-funded STD programs, 91% reported a great deal to moderate impact from staff reassignment in April 2020, with 28% of respondents reporting permanent reassignment of disease intervention specialist staff. Telemedicine was implemented in 47%. Decreases in STD case reports were reported by most jurisdictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology
18.
Sex Transm Dis ; 49(2): 154-159, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722723

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Measures to reduce coronavirus disease (COVID-19) transmission may impact sexual health. We aimed to examine the impact of COVID-19 on sexual behavior and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and to characterize individuals who were at high STI risk. METHODS: Dutch heterosexual males and females who participated in a cohort study in 2016 to 2018 were invited to fill out 2 questionnaires again in 2020 (age, 21-28 years). We used behavioral and psychological data from: prelockdown (September 2019 to February 2020), lockdown (March to May 2020), and postlockdown (June to August 2020). Behavior change was compared between subgroups identified with latent class analysis. RESULTS: Four latent classes were identified (n = 238). Individuals in class 1 (48% of study population) and class 2 (36%) were at low STI risk and reported mostly steady partnerships. Individuals in class 3 (9%) and class 4 (7%) reported multiple casual partners prelockdown. Class 4 was characterized by lower condom use and health goals, negative infection prevention attitudes, and higher impulsiveness compared with class 3. Furthermore, same/increased partner numbers during lockdown (class 3, 18%; class 4, 56%) and postlockdown (class 3, 36%; class 4, 42%) compared with prelockdown was often reported. Of individuals who wanted an STI test during the pandemic, 62% in class 3 and 56% in class 4 did not get tested, mainly because they were unable to get an appointment. CONCLUSIONS: A subgroup of individuals, characterized by low health goals, negative infection prevention attitudes, and high impulsiveness, engaged in high-risk behavior during the pandemic. Identifying these individuals may help provide appropriate health care during strict lockdowns and after relaxation of measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Adult , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Heterosexuality , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Sexual Partners , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Young Adult
19.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(3): 739-742, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703458

ABSTRACT

Since the coronavirus disease pandemic response began in March 2020, tests, vaccinations, diagnoses, and treatment initiations for sexual health, HIV, and viral hepatitis in England have declined. The shift towards online and outreach services happened rapidly during 2020 and highlights the need to evaluate the effects of these strategies on health inequalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Hepatitis, Viral, Human , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , England/epidemiology , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/epidemiology , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/therapy , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
20.
Rev. bras. estud. popul ; 39: e0184, 2022. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1698767

ABSTRACT

A sífilis, uma infecção vertical e sexualmente transmissível, curável e prevenível, é um problema de saúde pública no Brasil. Métodos diagnósticos e tratamentos são importantes no controle da doença. A pandemia de Covid-19 causou atrasos em diagnósticos e no tratamento na atenção primária em várias doenças e em diversos países, pois interrompeu padrões usuais de atendimento à saúde. O objetivo do estudo é identificar se houve menor número de procedimentos diagnósticos e de tratamento realizados para sífilis nos primeiros sete meses de 2020, comparativamente à média dos mesmos meses entre 2016 e 2019, no Brasil e nas unidades federativas. A redução no número de procedimentos seria um indicativo de atraso no diagnóstico, na detecção e no tratamento da sífilis em 2020. Foram utilizadas informações disponibilizadas no Sistema de Informações Ambulatoriais (SIA/SUS). Os achados para o Brasil indicaram queda de 1/3 nos procedimentos de diagnóstico e de tratamento referentes à sífilis nos sete primeiros meses do ano da pandemia, comparados com a média dos sete primeiros meses nos quatro anos anteriores (2016-2019). Indicadores mostram diferenças importantes por unidades da federação, apontando para maiores quedas proporcionais nos volumes de procedimentos no Norte e Nordeste, com ênfase nos estados do Maranhão, Roraima, Pará, Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, Amazonas, Pernambuco e Amapá.


Syphilis, a vertical and sexually transmitted infection, curable and preventable, is a public health problem in Brazil. Diagnostic methods and treatments are important in controlling the disease. The COVID-19 pandemic caused delays in diagnosis and lack of treatment in primary care in several diseases and in several countries, as the pandemic disrupted usual health care standards. The aim of the study was to identify whether there were fewer diagnostic and treatment procedures performed for syphilis in the first seven months of 2020, compared to the average for the same months between 2016 and 2019, in Brazil and Federative Units. The reduction in the number of procedures would be indicative of a delay in the diagnosis, detection and treatment of syphilis in 2020. Information used came from the Outpatient Information System (SIA / SUS). The findings for Brazil indicated a 1/3 drop in diagnosis and treatment procedures for syphilis in the first seven months of the year of the COVID-19 pandemic, compared with the first seven months of the previous four years (2016-2019). Indicators showed important differences by Federation Units, pointing to greater proportional decrease in the volume of procedures in the North and Northeast, with an emphasis on Maranhão, Roraima, Pará, Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, Amazonas, Pernambuco and Amapá.


La sífilis, una infección vertical y de transmisión sexual, curable y prevenible, es un problema de salud pública en Brasil. Los métodos de diagnóstico y los tratamientos son importantes para controlar la enfermedad. La pandemia de Covid-19 provocó retrasos en el diagnóstico y tratamiento en la atención primaria de variadas enfermedades en varios países, ya que interrumpió los estándares habituales de atención de la salud. El objetivo del estudio fue identificar si se realizaron menos procedimientos de diagnóstico y tratamiento de la sífilis en los primeros siete meses de 2020 en comparación con la media de los mismos meses entre 2016 y 2019, en Brasil y en sus unidades federativas. La reducción del número de procedimientos indicaría indicativo de un retraso en el diagnóstico, la detección temprana y el tratamiento de la sífilis en 2020. Para ello se utilizó la información disponible en el Sistema de Información Ambulatoria (SIA/SUS). Los hallazgos indicaron una caída de un tercio en los procedimientos de diagnóstico y tratamiento de la sífilis en los primeros siete meses del año de la pandemia de Covid-19 para Brasil, en comparación con los primeros siete meses de los cuatro años anteriores (2016-2019). Los indicadores mostraron diferencias importantes por unidades de la Federación, apuntando a mayores caídas proporcionales en el volumen de trámites en el Norte y Nordeste, con énfasis en Maranhão, Roraima, Pará, Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, Amazonas, Pernambuco y Amapá.


Subject(s)
Humans , Unified Health System , Brazil , Syphilis/diagnosis , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures , Pandemics , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorption Test , Delivery of Health Care
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