Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 39
Filter
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 692461, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775813

ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual habits, and behavior among students of medical and nonmedical students in Serbia. Methodology: The cross-sectional study of 1,273 university students of four undergraduate institutions in Serbia, two of medical and two of nonmedical orientation. A standardized questionnaire, prepared in line with the questionnaire of the European health research-the second wave (European Health Interview Survey-EHIS wave 2), according to defined internationally accepted indicators, was used as a survey instrument. Results: Statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) between medical and nonmedical student groups was determined for the following parameters: naming four of five STIs (29.1 vs. 13.4%), knowledge about vaccines against some STIs (26.0 vs. 17.0%), relationship between HPV infection and cervical malignancy (48.2 vs. 16.7%) engaged in the sexual relations (87.9 vs. 76.4%), never used a condom (15.2 vs. 10.4%), underwent gynecological or urological examination (66.7 vs. 44.1%), and tested to one of STIs (10.5 vs. 4.9%). Conclusion: Both student groups have limited knowledge on possible consequences that risky sexual behavior has for reproductive health. Promotion of knowledge about STIs, awareness of all complications, and consequences of these infections certainly affect the reduction of risky behavior.


Subject(s)
Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Habits , Humans , Serbia , Sexual Behavior , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Students , Universities
3.
Sex Transm Dis ; 49(4): e61-e63, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1752215

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted sexually transmitted disease (STD) services. Of 59 US-funded STD programs, 91% reported a great deal to moderate impact from staff reassignment in April 2020, with 28% of respondents reporting permanent reassignment of disease intervention specialist staff. Telemedicine was implemented in 47%. Decreases in STD case reports were reported by most jurisdictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology
5.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0261034, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686093

ABSTRACT

Despite billions of dollars invested into Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) efforts, the effect of incorporating sexual pleasure, a key driver of why people have sex, in sexual health interventions is currently unclear. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis following PRISMA guidelines across 7 databases for relevant articles published between 1 January 2005-1 June, 2020. We included 33 unique interventions in our systematic review. Eight interventions reporting condom use outcomes were meta-analyzed together with a method random effects model. Quality appraisal was carried out through the Cochrane Collaborations' RoB2 tool. This study was pre-registered on Prospero (ID: CRD42020201822). We identified 33 unique interventions (18886 participants at baseline) that incorporate pleasure. All included interventions targeted HIV/STI risk reduction, none occurred in the context of pregnancy prevention or family planning. We find that the majority of interventions targeted populations that authors classified as high-risk. We were able to meta-analyze 8 studies (6634 participants at baseline) reporting condom use as an outcome and found an overall moderate, positive, and significant effect of Cohen's d = 0·37 (95% CI 0·20-0·54, p < 0·001; I2 = 48%; τ2 = 0·043, p = 0·06). Incorporating sexual pleasure within SRHR interventions can improve sexual health outcomes. Our meta-analysis provides evidence about the positive impact of pleasure-incorporating interventions on condom use which has direct implications for reductions in HIV and STIs. Qualitatively, we find evidence that pleasure can have positive effects across different informational and knowledge-based attitudes as well. Future work is needed to further elucidate the impacts of pleasure within SRHR and across different outcomes and populations. Taking all the available evidence into account, we recommend that agencies responsible for sexual and reproductive health consider incorporating sexual pleasure considerations within their programming.


Subject(s)
Sexual Health , Databases, Factual , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Reproductive Health , Right to Health , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
6.
Euro Surveill ; 27(3)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643420

ABSTRACT

Partner notification (PN) is an essential element of sexually transmitted infection (STI) control. It enables identification, treatment and advice for sexual contacts who may benefit from additional preventive interventions such as HIV pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis. PN is most effective in reducing STI transmission when it reaches individuals who are most likely to have an STI and to engage in sexual behaviour that facilitates STI transmission, including having multiple and/or new sex partners. Outcomes of PN practice need to be measurable in order to inform standards. They need to address all five stages in the cascade of care: elicitation of partners, establishing contactable partners, notification, testing and treatment. In the United Kingdom, established outcome measures cover only the first three stages and do not take into account the type of sexual partnership. We report an evidence-based process to develop new PN outcomes and inform standards of care. We undertook a systematic literature review, evaluation of published information on types of sexual partnership and a modified Delphi process to reach consensus. We propose six new PN outcome measures at five stages of the cascade, including stratification by sex partnership type. Our framework for PN outcome measurement has potential to contribute in other domains, including Covid-19 contact tracing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Consensus , Contact Tracing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Partners , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
Lancet Public Health ; 7(1): e36-e47, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592783

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected sexual and reproductive health (SRH) service use and unmet need, but the impact is unknown. We aimed to determine the proportion of participants reporting sexual risk behaviours, SRH service use and unmet need, and to assess remote sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing service use after the first national lockdown in Britain. METHODS: We used data from the National Surveys of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal)-COVID cross-sectional, quasi-representative web survey (Natsal-COVID Wave 1). Adults aged 18-59 years who resided in England, Scotland, or Wales completed the survey between July 29 and Aug 10, 2020, which included questions about the approximate 4-month period after announcement of the initial lockdown in Britain (March 23, 2020). Quota-based sampling and weighting were used to achieve a quasi-representative population sample. Participants aged 45-59 years were excluded from services analysis due to low rates of SRH service use. Among individuals aged 18-44 years, we estimated reported SRH service use and inability to access, and calculated age-adjusted odds ratios (aORs) among sexually experienced individuals (those reporting any sexual partner in their lifetime) and sexually active individuals (those reporting any sexual partner in the past year). Unweighted denominators and weighted estimates are presented hereafter. FINDINGS: 6654 individuals had complete interviews and were included in the analysis. Among 3758 participants aged 18-44 years, 82·0% reported being sexually experienced, and 73·7% reported being sexually active. 20·8% of sexually experienced participants aged 18-44 years reported using SRH services in the 4-month period. Overall, 9·7% of 3108 participants (9·5% of men; 9·9% of women) reported being unable to use a service they needed, although of the participants who reported trying but not being able to use a SRH service at least once, 76·4% of participants also reported an instance of successful use. 5·9% of 1221 sexually active men and 3·6% of 1560 sexually active women reported use of STI-related services and 14·8% of 1728 sexually experienced women reported use of contraceptive services, with SRH service use highest among individuals aged 18-24 years. Sexually active participants reporting condomless sex with new partners since lockdown were much more likely to report using STI-related services than those who did not report condomless sex (aOR 23·8 [95% CI 11·6-48·9]) for men, 10·5 [3·9-28·2] for women) and, among men, were also more likely to have an unsuccessful attempt at STI-service use (aOR 13·3 [5·3-32·9]). Among 106 individuals who reported using STI testing services, 64·4% accessed services remotely (telephone, video, or online). Among 2581 women aged 25-59 years, 2·4% reported cervical screening compared with an estimated 6% in a comparable 4-month period before the pandemic. INTERPRETATION: Many people accessed SRH care during the initial lockdown; however, young people and those reporting sexual risk behaviours reported difficulties in accessing services and thus such services might need to address a backlog of need. FUNDING: Wellcome Trust, The Economic and Social Research Council, The National Institute for Health Research, Medical Research Council/Chief Scientist Office and Public Health Sciences Unit, and UCL Coronavirus Response Fund.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Reproductive Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Behavior , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Quarantine , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Young Adult
9.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(5): 657-667, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510463

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are highly prevalent among men who have sex with men who use HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which leads to antimicrobial consumption linked to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to assess use of an antiseptic mouthwash as an antibiotic sparing approach to prevent STIs. METHODS: We invited people using PrEP who had an STI in the past 24 months to participate in this single-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, AB/BA crossover superiority trial at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium. Using block randomisation (block size eight), participants were assigned (1:1) to first receive Listerine Cool Mint or a placebo mouthwash. They were required to use the study mouthwashes daily and before and after sex for 3 months each and to ask their sexual partners to use the mouthwash before and after sex. Participants were screened every 3 months for syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhoea at the oropharynx, anorectum, and urethra. The primary outcome was combined incidence of these STIs during each 3-month period, assessed in the intention-to-treat population, which included all participants who completed at least the first 3-month period. Safety was assessed as a secondary outcome. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT03881007. FINDINGS: Between April 2, 2019, and March 13, 2020, 343 participants were enrolled: 172 in the Listerine followed by placebo (Listerine-placebo) group and 171 in the placebo followed by Listerine (placebo-Listerine) group. The trial was terminated prematurely because of the COVID-19 pandemic. 151 participants completed the entire study, and 89 completed only the first 3-month period. 31 participants withdrew consent, ten were lost to follow-up, and one acquired HIV. In the Listerine-placebo group, the STI incidence rate was 140·4 per 100 person-years during the Listerine period, and 102·6 per 100 person-years during the placebo period. In the placebo-Listerine arm, the STI incidence rate was 133·9 per 100 person-years during the placebo period, and 147·5 per 100 person-years during the Listerine period. We did not find that Listerine significantly reduced STI incidence (IRR 1·17, 95% CI 0·84-1·64). Numbers of adverse events were not significantly higher than at baseline and were similar while using Listerine and placebo. Four serious adverse events (one HIV-infection, one severe depression, one Ludwig's angina, and one testicular carcinoma) were not considered to be related to use of mouthwash. INTERPRETATION: Our findings do not support the use of Listerine Cool Mint as a way to prevent STI acquisition among high-risk populations. FUNDING: Belgian Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO 121·00).


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Mouthwashes , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Adult , Cross-Over Studies , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
10.
Sex Transm Dis ; 48(8S): S50-S53, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503626

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The National Sexually Transmitted Diseases Curriculum is an e-learning platform. New registrations and learning group creations in March to April 2020 were compared with previous 12-month data. Substantial increases in registrations and learning groups demonstrate that the National Sexually Transmitted Diseases Curriculum was successfully leveraged to meet rapidly shifting training needs due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
11.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 64(11): 1440-1451, 2021 Nov.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491066

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Application-based data regarding sexual health and sexual behavior in various sexually active populations are scarce but at the same time relevant with regards to prevention and healthcare supply strategies. Given the structure of its attendees, the Walk In Ruhr (WIR) Center for Sexual Health and Medicine is able to obtain data from diverse living environments. OBJECTIVES: Based on the online HIV/STI risk test, questionnaires, and attendee data from the WIR, this study aims to deduce population-related findings with regards to age, gender, sexual orientation, and sexual and risk behavior as well as the respective needs for prevention. The influence of the SARS-CoV-19 pandemic on sexual behavior is examined by comparing various phases. METHODS: The analyzed data sources are the online HIV/STI risk test, the COWIR, and the PrEP study as well as the immunological outpatient clinic and the public health department at the WIR. RESULTS: Notwithstanding contact restrictions, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have increased from 2019 to 2020. Apart from men having sex with men and females having sex with females, young people also have an increased risk of STIs based on sexual practices and the number of sexual contacts. A large number of bisexual and transsexual contacts was found. SARS-CoV­2 led to a decrease in sexual contacts; sexual practices continued. There was a growing proportion of STI tests and the treatment rate including partner treatment rose. DISCUSSION: Data from the WIR center show that young attendees with an active sexual life are being reached. The results from questionnaires and the online HIV/STI risk test are mirrored in increased positive STI test results. These results vary depending on sexual behavior and sexual preferences such that specific strategies for sexual education, prevention, testing, and therapy are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Adolescent , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Germany , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(Suppl 2): 866, 2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The HIV pandemic impacts the lives of millions and despite the global coordinated response, innovative actions are still needed to end it. A major challenge is the added burden of coinfections such as viral hepatitis, tuberculosis and various sexually transmitted infections in terms of prevention, treatment and increased morbidity in individuals with HIV infection. A need for combination prevention strategies, tailored to high-risk key populations arises and technology-based interventions can be a valuable asset. The COVID-19 pandemic challenged the delivery of existing services and added stress to existing public health and clinical structures but also highlighted the potential of exploiting technical solutions for interventions regarding infectious diseases. In this paper we report the design process, results and evaluation findings from the pilots of 'RiskRadar'-a web and mobile application aiming to support combination prevention, testing and linkage to care for HIV, viral hepatitis, various sexually transmitted infections and tuberculosis. METHODS: RiskRadar was developed for the INTEGRATE Joint Action's aim to improve, adapt and pilot innovative digital tools for combination prevention. RiskRadar was designed iteratively using informed end-user-oriented approaches. Emphasis was placed on the Risk Calculator that enables users to assess their risk of exposure to one or more of the four disease areas, make informed decisions to seek testing or care and adjust their behaviours ultimately aiming to harm/risk reduction. RiskRadar has been piloted in three countries, namely Croatia, Italy and Lithuania. RESULTS: RiskRadar has been used 1347 times across all platforms so far. More than 90% of users have found RiskRadar useful and would use it again, especially the Risk Calculator component. Almost 49.25% are men and 29.85% are in the age group of 25-34. The application has scored 5.2/7 in the User Experience Questionnaire, where it is mainly described as "supportive" and "easy-to-use". The qualitative evaluation of RiskRadar also yielded positive feedback. CONCLUSIONS: Pilot results demonstrate above average satisfaction with RiskRadar and high user-reported usability scores, supporting the idea that technical interventions could significantly support combination prevention actions on Sexually Transmitted Infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Hepatitis, Viral, Human , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Tuberculosis , Adult , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/epidemiology , Hepatitis, Viral, Human/prevention & control , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Tuberculosis/prevention & control
13.
Sex Transm Dis ; 49(4): e61-e63, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470205

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted sexually transmitted disease (STD) services. Of 59 US-funded STD programs, 91% reported a great deal to moderate impact from staff reassignment in April 2020, with 28% of respondents reporting permanent reassignment of disease intervention specialist staff. Telemedicine was implemented in 47%. Decreases in STD case reports were reported by most jurisdictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology
14.
Curr HIV/AIDS Rep ; 18(4): 261-270, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408775

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review highlights the intersection of the COVID-19, HIV, and STI pandemics and examines how harm reduction strategies can be applied broadly to controlling a pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, remarkable advances in the understanding of COVID-19 prevention, diagnosis, and treatment have been made at a much faster pace than prior pandemics, yet much more still remains to be discovered. Many of the strategies to control the COVID-19 pandemic mirror those employed to stem the HIV pandemic. Harm reduction principles used in the HIV pandemic can be applied to reduce the morbidity and mortality of the COVID-19 pandemic through effective prevention, detection, and treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Harm Reduction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Chemoprevention , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/therapy , Humans , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/therapy , Vaccination
15.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 45(6): 622-627, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388134

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Examine the changes in service delivery Australian public sexual health clinics made to remain open during lockdown. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey designed and delivered on Qualtrics was emailed to 21 directors of public sexual health clinics across Australia from July-August 2020 and asked about a variety of changes to service delivery. Descriptive statistics were calculated. RESULTS: Twenty clinics participated, all remained open and reported service changes, including suspension of walk-in services in eight clinics. Some clinics stopped offering asymptomatic screening for varying patient populations. Most clinics transitioned to a mix of telehealth and face-to-face consultations. Nineteen clinics reported delays in testing and 13 reported limitations in testing. Most clinics changed to phone consultations for HIV medication refills (n=15) and eleven clinics prescribed longer repeat prescriptions. Fourteen clinics had staff redeployed to assist the COVID-19 response. CONCLUSION: Public sexual health clinics pivoted service delivery to reduce risk of COVID-19 transmission in clinical settings, managed staffing reductions and delays in molecular testing, and maintained a focus on urgent and symptomatic STI presentations and those at higher risk of HIV/STI acquisition. Implications for public health: Further research is warranted to understand what impact reduced asymptomatic screening may have had on community STI transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Australia/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Services , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
17.
Braz J Infect Dis ; 25(5): 101617, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mobility restrictions and overloaded health services during the COVID-19 pandemic compromised services dedicated to the prevention and care of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). In this study, we present client's responses to standardized questionnaires applied during the COVID-19 pandemic period as part of the strategy to measure impacts on social and sexual vulnerability, access to STI prevention services, and access to STI care. METHODS: The questionnaires included variables on sociodemographics, behavior, risk perception, prevention attitudes, barriers to service-based HIV rapid test, reasons for taking an HIV self-test, and access to health services for STI diagnosis and treatment. We explored demographic variables associated with income reduction, reduced access to HIV/STI testing/treatment and increased vulnerability to HIV/STI. RESULTS: 847 participants responded to the study questionnaire between May 2020 and January 2021. Most were young, cisgender male, and 63% self-reported as men who have sex with men. Income reductions were reported by 50%, with 30% reporting a decline over 50% of total income. An increase in heavy episodic drinking (>5 doses) was reported by 18%; 7% reported more sexual partners and 6% reported using condoms less often. Difficulties in obtaining HIV tests, tests for other STI and treatment for STI were reported by 5%, 6% and 6%, respectively. Lower schooling was significantly associated with income reduction (p = 0.004) and with reduced access to HIV/STI testing or STI treatment (p = 0.024); employment status was associated with income reduction (p < 0.001) and increased vulnerability to HIV/STI (p = 0.027). Having access to an expedite test result, avoiding physical attendance in health units during the pandemic, and undertaking the test with privacy with a trusted person were reported as motivators for HIV self-test. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are relevant to promote service improvements tailored to subgroups more likely to struggle with detrimental effects during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Attitude , Delivery of Health Care , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control
18.
AIDS Behav ; 26(3): 631-638, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356012

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused disruptions to health care access for sexual and gender minorities in the U.S. We sought to explore the impact of COVID-19 on HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use and sexual health services by assessing PrEP eligibility and use, changes in sexual behaviors, and HIV/STI testing during the COVID-19 pandemic. We surveyed 239 young sexual minority men (YSMM) 17-24 years old between April and September 2020 in the U.S. One-in-seven YSMM PrEP users discontinued use during the pandemic, and all those who discontinued PrEP reported a decrease in sexual activity. Twenty percent reported difficulty getting prescriptions and medications from their doctors or pharmacies, and more than 10% reported challenges accessing HIV/STI testing. Among those who met Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for PrEP (n = 104), 86.5% were not currently using PrEP. Among those surveyed 3 months or later after the start of major COVID-19 stay-at-home measures (n = 165), 35.8% reported CAS with a causal partner within the past 3 months during the COVID-19 pandemic. Seeking HIV testing was associated with reporting condomless anal sex in the previous 3 months, indicating the necessity for ensuring continuity of basic sexual health services for YSMM. Failure to adequately adjust HIV prevention services and intervention in the face of pandemic-related adversity undermines efforts to end the HIV epidemic in the U.S.


RESUMEN: La pandemia de COVID-19 ha causado interrupciones en el acceso a la atención médica para las minorías sexuales y de género en los EE. UU. Buscamos explorar el impacto de COVID-19 en el uso de la profilaxis de preexposición al VIH (PrEP) y los servicios de salud sexual mediante la evaluación de la elegibilidad y el uso de PrEP, los cambios en los comportamientos sexuales y las pruebas de VIH/ITS durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Encuestamos a 239 hombres jóvenes de minorías sexuales (YSMM) de 17 a 24 años entre abril y septiembre de 2020 en los EE. UU. Uno de cada siete usuarios de PrEP YSMM interrumpió su uso durante la pandemia, y todos los que interrumpieron la PrEP informaron una disminución en la actividad sexual. El veinte por ciento informó tener dificultades para obtener recetas y medicamentos de sus médicos o farmacias, y más del 10% informó tener dificultades para acceder a las pruebas de VIH/ITS. Entre los que cumplieron con los criterios de los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades para la PrEP (n = 104), el 86,5% no estaba usando PrEP actualmente. Entre los encuestados 3 meses o más después del inicio de las principales medidas de COVID-19 para quedarse en casa (n = 165), el 35,8% informó CAS con una pareja causal en los últimos 3 meses durante la pandemia de COVID-19. La búsqueda de la prueba del VIH se asoció con la notificación de sexo anal sin condón en los 3 meses anteriores, lo que indica la necesidad de garantizar la continuidad de los servicios básicos de salud sexual para YSMM. No ajustar adecuadamente los servicios de prevención del VIH y la intervención frente a la adversidad relacionada con la pandemia socava los esfuerzos para poner fin a la epidemia del VIH en los EE. UU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Adolescent , Adult , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Young Adult
19.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 87(5): 1111-1118, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337300

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We assessed how the Dutch restrictions imposed on March 15, 2020, affected sexual behavior, preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and condom use among PrEP users in Amsterdam. METHODS: We used data on (1) PrEP use, (2) anal sex acts, and (3) condom use, per partner type [steady partners (SPs), known casual partners (KCPs), and unknown casual partners (UCPs)], collected daily through a mobile application used between December 1, 2019, and June 30, 2020. We compared the period before versus after March 15, 2020, regarding average proportion of days per week at which each end point was reported and average proportion of anal sex acts covered by PrEP and/or condoms. RESULTS: We included data from 136 men who have sex with men. After March 15, 2020, the proportion of days with anal sex increased with SPs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10 to 1.44) and decreased with KCPs (OR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.64 to 0.82) and UCPs (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.61). Shifts in partner types were most profound immediately after March 15, 2020, whereas returning to prerestriction levels mid-May 2020. The proportion of days with PrEP use decreased from 74% before to 58% after March 15, 2020 (P < 0.001). After March 15, 2020, PrEP use during sex decreased with UCPs (ß = -0.36; 95% CI = -0.72 to 0.00) but not with SPs and KCPs. Condom use during sex decreased with KCPs (ß = -0.36; 95% CI = -0.67 to 0.04) and UCPs (ß = -0.24; 95% CI = -0.46 to 0.03) but not with SPs. CONCLUSIONS: MSM decreased sex with casual partners and increased sex with SP, but changes were transient. Decreases in sex acts with casual partners paralleled decreases in PrEP use. However, condom use during sex with casual partners decreased, indicating the importance of continued sexual health services, including sexually transmitted infections screening and PrEP care, during COVID-19 restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexual Behavior , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Adult , Condoms , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Safe Sex , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/drug therapy
20.
Curr HIV/AIDS Rep ; 18(4): 261-270, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261816

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review highlights the intersection of the COVID-19, HIV, and STI pandemics and examines how harm reduction strategies can be applied broadly to controlling a pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, remarkable advances in the understanding of COVID-19 prevention, diagnosis, and treatment have been made at a much faster pace than prior pandemics, yet much more still remains to be discovered. Many of the strategies to control the COVID-19 pandemic mirror those employed to stem the HIV pandemic. Harm reduction principles used in the HIV pandemic can be applied to reduce the morbidity and mortality of the COVID-19 pandemic through effective prevention, detection, and treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Harm Reduction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Chemoprevention , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/therapy , Humans , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/therapy , Vaccination
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL