Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
2.
Anaesthesist ; 70(8): 673-680, 2021 Aug.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The reported mortality for sepsis and septic shock varies between 15% and 59% in international comparison. For Germany, the number of studies is limited. Previous estimations of mortality in Germany are outdated or based on claims data analyses. Various authors discuss whether lacking quality initiatives and treatment standards in Germany could cause higher mortality for sepsis. This contrasts with the internationally well-recognized performance of the German intensive care infrastructure during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to estimate 30-day and 90-day mortality of patients with sepsis and patients with septic shock in Germany and to compare the mortality with that of other industrialized regions (Europe, North America). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic literature search included interventional and observational studies published between 2009 and 2020 in PubMed and the Cochrane Library that analyzed adult patients with sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock in Europe and North America. Studies with less than 20 patients were excluded. The 30-day and 90-day mortality for sepsis and septic shock were pooled separately for studies conducted in Germany, Europe (excluding Germany) and North America in a meta-analysis using a random effects model. Mortality over time was analyzed in a linear regression model. RESULTS: Overall, 134 studies were included. Of these, 15 studies were identified for the estimation of mortality in Germany, covering 10,434 patients, the number of patients per study ranged from 28 to 4183 patients. The 30-day mortality for sepsis was 26.50% (95% confidence interval, CI: 19.86-33.15%) in Germany, 23.85% (95% CI: 20.49-27.21%) in Europe (excluding Germany) and 19.58% (95% CI: 14.03-25.14%) in North America. The 30-day mortality for septic shock was 30.48% (95% CI: 29.30-31.67%) in Germany, 34.57% (95% CI: 33.51-35.64%) in Europe (excluding Germany) and 33.69% (95% CI: 31.51-35.86%) in North America. The 90-day mortality for septic shock was 38.78% (95% CI: 32.70-44.86%) in Germany, 41.90% (95% CI: 38.88-44.91%) in Europe (excluding Germany) and 34.41% (95% CI: 25.66-43.16%) in North America. A comparable decreasing trend in sepsis 30-day mortality was observed in all considered regions since 2009. CONCLUSION: Our analysis does not support the notion that mortality related to sepsis and septic shock in Germany is higher in international comparison. A higher mortality would not be obvious either, since intensive care, for example also during the COVID-19 pandemic, is regarded as exemplary in Germany and the structural quality, such as the number of intensive care beds per 100,000 inhabitants, is high in international comparison. Nevertheless, deficits could also exist outside intensive care medicine. A comparison of international individual studies should take greater account of the structure of healthcare systems, the severity of disease and the limitations resulting from the data sources used.


Subject(s)
Sepsis , Shock, Septic , Adult , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Sepsis/mortality , Shock, Septic/mortality
4.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255811, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity has emerged as a risk factor for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. To inform treatment considerations the relationship between obesity and COVID-19 complications and the influence of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic factors deserves continued attention. OBJECTIVE: To determine if obesity is an independent risk factor for severe COVID-19 complications and mortality and examine the relationship between BMI, race, ethnicity, distressed community index and COVID-19 complications and mortality. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 1,019 SARS-CoV-2 positive adult admitted to an academic medical center (n = 928) and its affiliated community hospital (n-91) in New York City from March 1 to April 18, 2020. RESULTS: Median age was 64 years (IQR 52-75), 58.7% were men, 23.0% were Black, and 52.8% were Hispanic. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 75.2%; median BMI was 28.5 kg/m2 (25.1-33.0). Over the study period 23.7% patients died, 27.3% required invasive mechanical ventilation, 22.7% developed septic shock, and 9.1% required renal replacement therapy (RRT). In the multivariable logistic regression model, BMI was associated with complications including intubation (Odds Ratio [OR]1.03, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]1.01-1.05), septic shock (OR 1.04, CI 1.01-1.06), and RRT (OR1.07, CI 1.04-1.10), and mortality (OR 1.04, CI 1.01-1.06). The odds of death were highest among those with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 (OR 2.05, CI 1.04-4.04). Mortality did not differ by race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic distress score, though Black and Asian patients were more likely to require RRT. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Severe complications of COVID-19 and death are more likely in patients with obesity, independent of age and comorbidities. While race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status did not impact COVID-19 related mortality, Black and Asian patients were more likely to require RRT. The presence of obesity, and in some instances race, should inform resource allocation and risk stratification in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Kidney Diseases/etiology , Obesity/complications , Shock, Septic/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Kidney Diseases/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , Obesity/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Shock, Septic/mortality , Survival Rate
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 4263, 2021 02 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091460

ABSTRACT

Infection by the new corona virus strain SARS-CoV-2 and its related syndrome COVID-19 has been associated with more than two million deaths worldwide. Patients of higher age and with preexisting chronic health conditions are at an increased risk of fatal disease outcome. However, detailed information on causes of death and the contribution of pre-existing health conditions to death yet is missing, which can be reliably established by autopsy only. We performed full body autopsies on 26 patients that had died after SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 at the Charité University Hospital Berlin, Germany, or at associated teaching hospitals. We systematically evaluated causes of death and pre-existing health conditions. Additionally, clinical records and death certificates were evaluated. We report findings on causes of death and comorbidities of 26 decedents that had clinically presented with severe COVID-19. We found that septic shock and multi organ failure was the most common immediate cause of death, often due to suppurative pulmonary infection. Respiratory failure due to diffuse alveolar damage presented as immediate cause of death in fewer cases. Several comorbidities, such as hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and obesity were present in the vast majority of patients. Our findings reveal that causes of death were directly related to COVID-19 in the majority of decedents, while they appear not to be an immediate result of preexisting health conditions and comorbidities. We therefore suggest that the majority of patients had died of COVID-19 with only contributory implications of preexisting health conditions to the mechanism of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Hospital Mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , Berlin/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitals, Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Myocardial Ischemia/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Shock, Septic/mortality , Shock, Septic/virology
6.
Artif Organs ; 45(6): E187-E194, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087949

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been shown to involve the gastrointestinal tract, which implies bacterial translocation and endotoxemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of extracorporeal endotoxin removal by Polymyxin B hemoperfusion (PMX-HP), in the treatment of patients with COVID-19 and secondary bacterial infection. We conducted a subgroup analysis of a multicenter, multinational, prospective, and observational web-based database (EUPHAS2 registry). We included 12 patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection confirmed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction from nasal/oral swab, admitted to the intensive care unit between February and May 2020, who were affected by septic shock and received PMX-HP as per clinical indication of the attending physician. Septic shock was diagnosed in nine patients (75%), with a median time between symptoms onset and PMX-HP treatment of 16 (14-22) days. We identified Gram-negative bacteria in most of the microbiological cultures (N = 17, 65%), followed by Gram-positive bacteria in (N = 4, 15%), fungi (N = 3, 12%) and no growth (N = 2, 8%). Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score progressively improved over the next 120 hours following PMX-HP and it was associated with median endotoxin activity assay (EAA) decrease from 0.78 [0.70-0.92] at T0 to 0.60 [0.44-0.72] at T120 (P = .245). A direct correlation was observed between SOFA score and EAA. Lung Injury Score decreased and was associated with hemodynamic improvement over the same period. No statistically significant difference was observed for RIFLE score at each time point. Nine out of 12 patients (75%) required continuous renal replacement therapy because of acute kidney injury. In a series of consecutive COVID-19 patients with endotoxic shock, PMX-HP was associated with organ function recovery, hemodynamic improvement, and contemporary EAA level reduction. No PMX-HP-related complications were observed.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Endotoxemia/drug therapy , Endotoxemia/microbiology , Polymyxin B/therapeutic use , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Shock, Septic/microbiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness , Endotoxemia/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prospective Studies , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock, Septic/mortality
7.
Anaesthesist ; 70(8): 673-680, 2021 Aug.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070812

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The reported mortality for sepsis and septic shock varies between 15% and 59% in international comparison. For Germany, the number of studies is limited. Previous estimations of mortality in Germany are outdated or based on claims data analyses. Various authors discuss whether lacking quality initiatives and treatment standards in Germany could cause higher mortality for sepsis. This contrasts with the internationally well-recognized performance of the German intensive care infrastructure during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to estimate 30-day and 90-day mortality of patients with sepsis and patients with septic shock in Germany and to compare the mortality with that of other industrialized regions (Europe, North America). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic literature search included interventional and observational studies published between 2009 and 2020 in PubMed and the Cochrane Library that analyzed adult patients with sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock in Europe and North America. Studies with less than 20 patients were excluded. The 30-day and 90-day mortality for sepsis and septic shock were pooled separately for studies conducted in Germany, Europe (excluding Germany) and North America in a meta-analysis using a random effects model. Mortality over time was analyzed in a linear regression model. RESULTS: Overall, 134 studies were included. Of these, 15 studies were identified for the estimation of mortality in Germany, covering 10,434 patients, the number of patients per study ranged from 28 to 4183 patients. The 30-day mortality for sepsis was 26.50% (95% confidence interval, CI: 19.86-33.15%) in Germany, 23.85% (95% CI: 20.49-27.21%) in Europe (excluding Germany) and 19.58% (95% CI: 14.03-25.14%) in North America. The 30-day mortality for septic shock was 30.48% (95% CI: 29.30-31.67%) in Germany, 34.57% (95% CI: 33.51-35.64%) in Europe (excluding Germany) and 33.69% (95% CI: 31.51-35.86%) in North America. The 90-day mortality for septic shock was 38.78% (95% CI: 32.70-44.86%) in Germany, 41.90% (95% CI: 38.88-44.91%) in Europe (excluding Germany) and 34.41% (95% CI: 25.66-43.16%) in North America. A comparable decreasing trend in sepsis 30-day mortality was observed in all considered regions since 2009. CONCLUSION: Our analysis does not support the notion that mortality related to sepsis and septic shock in Germany is higher in international comparison. A higher mortality would not be obvious either, since intensive care, for example also during the COVID-19 pandemic, is regarded as exemplary in Germany and the structural quality, such as the number of intensive care beds per 100,000 inhabitants, is high in international comparison. Nevertheless, deficits could also exist outside intensive care medicine. A comparison of international individual studies should take greater account of the structure of healthcare systems, the severity of disease and the limitations resulting from the data sources used.


Subject(s)
Sepsis , Shock, Septic , Adult , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Sepsis/mortality , Shock, Septic/mortality
10.
Cell Mol Immunol ; 17(9): 992-994, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-630398
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...