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1.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5458-5473, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272201

ABSTRACT

Kawasaki-like disease (KLD) and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) are considered as challenges for pediatric patients under the age of 18 infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A systematic search was performed on July 2, 2020, and updated on December 1, 2020, to identify studies on KLD/MIS-C associated with COVID-19. The databases of Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Scholar were searched. The hospitalized children with a presentation of Kawasaki disease (KD), KLD, MIS-C, or inflammatory shock syndromes were included. A total number of 133 children in 45 studies were reviewed. A total of 74 (55.6%) cases had been admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Also, 49 (36.8%) patients had required respiratory support, of whom 31 (23.3%) cases had required mechanical ventilation/intubation, 18 (13.5%) cases had required other oxygen therapies. In total, 79 (59.4%) cases had been discharged from hospitals, 3 (2.2%) had been readmitted, 9 (6.7%) had been hospitalized at the time of the study, and 9 (6.7%) patients had expired due to the severe heart failure, shock, brain infarction. Similar outcomes had not been reported in other patients. Approximately two-thirds of the children with KLD associated with COVID-19 had been admitted to PICUs, around one-fourth of them had required mechanical ventilation/intubation, and even some of them had been required readmissions. Therefore, physicians are strongly recommended to monitor children that present with the characteristics of KD during the pandemic as they can be the dominant manifestations in children with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Brain Infarction/complications , COVID-19/complications , Heart Failure/complications , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Shock/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Brain Infarction/diagnostic imaging , Brain Infarction/mortality , Brain Infarction/virology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Heart Failure/diagnostic imaging , Heart Failure/mortality , Heart Failure/virology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/mortality , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/virology , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Shock/diagnostic imaging , Shock/mortality , Shock/virology , Survival Analysis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
3.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 104(3_Suppl): 72-86, 2020 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-993926

ABSTRACT

As some patients infected with the novel coronavirus progress to critical illness, a subset will eventually develop shock. High-quality data on management of these patients are scarce, and further investigation will provide valuable information in the context of the pandemic. A group of experts identify a set of pragmatic recommendations for the care of patients with SARS-CoV-2 and shock in resource-limited environments. We define shock as life-threatening circulatory failure that results in inadequate tissue perfusion and cellular dysoxia/hypoxia, and suggest that it can be operationalized via clinical observations. We suggest a thorough evaluation for other potential causes of shock and suggest against indiscriminate testing for coinfections. We suggest the use of the quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) as a simple bedside prognostic score for COVID-19 patients and point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) to evaluate the etiology of shock. Regarding fluid therapy for the treatment of COVID-19 patients with shock in low-middle-income countries, we favor balanced crystalloids and recommend using a conservative fluid strategy for resuscitation. Where available and not prohibited by cost, we recommend using norepinephrine, given its safety profile. We favor avoiding the routine use of central venous or arterial catheters, where availability and costs are strong considerations. We also recommend using low-dose corticosteroids in patients with refractory shock. In addressing targets of resuscitation, we recommend the use of simple bedside parameters such as capillary refill time and suggest that POCUS be used to assess the need for further fluid resuscitation, if available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Developing Countries , Patient Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Shock/complications , Shock/diagnosis , Shock/therapy , Humans , Inpatients , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(1): 18-24, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871572

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The co-occurrence of chronic diseases in the elderly is a common problem. However, the relationship between comorbidities and the prognosis of elderly patients with COVID-19 was not clear. This study was supposed to describe the clinical characteristics of elderly patients with COVID-19 infection from Sichuan province and the effects of comorbidity. DESIGN: A retrospective study. SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: COVID-19 patients from Public Health Clinical Center of Chengdu between December 16, 2019 and February 26, 2020 were included in this study. Patients were divided into elderly group (≥60 years old) and non-elderly group (< 60 years old). RESULTS: Elderly patients with COVID-19 indicated relatively higher proportion of comorbidities, and the most common were atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (56.5%), hypertension (43.5%) and chronic pulmonary disease (21.7%). The proportion of severe cases was higher in elderly group than that in non-elderly group (73.9% and 42.2%, respectively, P=0.012). During hospitalization, elderly patients indicated relatively higher proportion of complications, such as shock (21.7%), respiratory failure (21.7%). The proportion of patients with a decreased number of CD8+ lymphocytes (82.6%) and B lymphocytes (77.8%) in elderly patients was significantly higher than that in non-elderly group (48.9% and 44.8%, respectively). All 3 deaths were elderly patients with comorbidities and the cell counts of T lymphocyte subsets, B and NK cells of them were significantly decreased at admission. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients with COVID-19 had a high proportion of severe cases and comorbidities, more likely to show low immune function, and indicate higher proportion of complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Geriatric Assessment , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Atherosclerosis/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Lung Diseases/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/complications , Young Adult
5.
J Pediatr ; 224: 141-145, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-727666

ABSTRACT

We report on the presentation and course of 33 children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. Hemodynamic instability and cardiac dysfunction were prominent findings, with most patients exhibiting rapid resolution following anti-inflammatory therapy.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Adolescent , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronary Aneurysm , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Female , Fever , Humans , Inflammation , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , New York City , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/complications , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/complications
7.
Turk J Med Sci ; 50(SI-1): 585-591, 2020 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686209

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) stands out as the major pandemic that we have experienced in the last century. As it affects every social structure, it brought the importance of intensive care support once again to the agenda of healthcare system after causing severe acute respiratory syndrome. The precautions to be taken against this virus, where our knowledge is extremely small, intensive care units take an indispensable place in pandemic planning. In this review, we aimed to emphasize the crucial points regarding intensive care management of COVID-19 patients, which we have written not only for intensivists but also for all healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Respiratory Therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/complications , Shock/complications
8.
Neurology ; 95(10): 454-457, 2020 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616669
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