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2.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(25): e181, 2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286918

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory disease in children is a Kawasaki disease like illness occurring after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection in children. As the pandemic progresses, similar syndromes were also reported in adult with a decreased incidence. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) can be characterized with shock, heart failure, and gastrointestinal symptoms with elevated inflammatory markers after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Herein, we describe the first case of MIS-A in South Korea. A 38-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 5-day history of abdominal pain and fever. He had been treated with antibiotics for 5 days at the previous hospital, but symptoms had worsened and he had developed orthopnea on the day of presentation. He suffered COVID-19 six weeks ago. Laboratory data revealed elevated white blood cell counts with neutrophil dominance, C-reactive protein, and B-type natriuretic peptide. Chest X-ray showed normal lung parenchyme and echocardiography showed severe biventricular failure with normal chamber size. We diagnosed him as MIS-A and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and steroid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Fever/etiology , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Male , Republic of Korea , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy
3.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(5): 613-621, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to surge in the United States and globally. OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of COVID-19-related critical illness, including trends in outcomes and care delivery. DESIGN: Single-health system, multihospital retrospective cohort study. SETTING: 5 hospitals within the University of Pennsylvania Health System. PATIENTS: Adults with COVID-19-related critical illness who were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) with acute respiratory failure or shock during the initial surge of the pandemic. MEASUREMENTS: The primary exposure for outcomes and care delivery trend analyses was longitudinal time during the pandemic. The primary outcome was all-cause 28-day in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were all-cause death at any time, receipt of mechanical ventilation (MV), and readmissions. RESULTS: Among 468 patients with COVID-19-related critical illness, 319 (68.2%) were treated with MV and 121 (25.9%) with vasopressors. Outcomes were notable for an all-cause 28-day in-hospital mortality rate of 29.9%, a median ICU stay of 8 days (interquartile range [IQR], 3 to 17 days), a median hospital stay of 13 days (IQR, 7 to 25 days), and an all-cause 30-day readmission rate (among nonhospice survivors) of 10.8%. Mortality decreased over time, from 43.5% (95% CI, 31.3% to 53.8%) to 19.2% (CI, 11.6% to 26.7%) between the first and last 15-day periods in the core adjusted model, whereas patient acuity and other factors did not change. LIMITATIONS: Single-health system study; use of, or highly dynamic trends in, other clinical interventions were not evaluated, nor were complications. CONCLUSION: Among patients with COVID-19-related critical illness admitted to ICUs of a learning health system in the United States, mortality seemed to decrease over time despite stable patient characteristics. Further studies are necessary to confirm this result and to investigate causal mechanisms. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Shock/mortality , Shock/therapy , APACHE , Academic Medical Centers , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/virology , Survival Rate
4.
Chest ; 159(6): 2309-2317, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064065

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with obesity are at higher risk for community-acquired and nosocomial infections. However, no study has specifically evaluated the relationship between obesity and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). RESEARCH QUESTION: Is obesity associated with an increased incidence of VAP? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This study was a post hoc analysis of the Impact of Early Enteral vs Parenteral Nutrition on Mortality in Patients Requiring Mechanical Ventilation and Catecholamines (NUTRIREA2) open-label, randomized controlled trial performed in 44 French ICUs. Adults receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support for shock and parenteral nutrition or enteral nutrition were included. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 at ICU admission. VAP diagnosis was adjudicated by an independent blinded committee, based on all available clinical, radiologic, and microbiologic data. Only first VAP episodes were taken into account. Incidence of VAP was analyzed by using the Fine and Gray model, with extubation and death as competing risks. RESULTS: A total of 699 (30%) of the 2,325 included patients had obesity; 224 first VAP episodes were diagnosed (60 and 164 in obese and nonobese groups, respectively). The incidence of VAP at day 28 was 8.6% vs 10.1% in the two groups (hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI 0.63-1.14; P = .26). After adjustment on sex, McCabe score, age, antiulcer treatment, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment at randomization, the incidence of VAP remained nonsignificant between obese and nonobese patients (hazard ratio, 0.893; 95% CI, 0.66-1.2; P = .46). Although no significant difference was found in duration of mechanical ventilation and ICU length of stay, 90-day mortality was significantly lower in obese than in nonobese patients (272 of 692 [39.3%] patients vs 718 of 1,605 [44.7%]; P = .02). In a subgroup of patients (n = 123) with available pepsin and alpha-amylase measurements, no significant difference was found in rate of abundant microaspiration of gastric contents, or oropharyngeal secretions between obese and nonobese patients. INTERPRETATION: Our results suggest that obesity has no significant impact on the incidence of VAP.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Intensive Care Units , Obesity/complications , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/etiology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Shock/therapy , Aged , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Parenteral Nutrition, Total/methods , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Survival Rate/trends
5.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e926751, 2021 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly worldwide, and scientists are trying to find a way to overcome the disease. We explored the risk factors that influence patient outcomes, including treatment regimens, which can provide a reference for further treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective cohort study analysis was performed using data from 97 patients with COVID-19 who visited Wuhan Union Hospital from February 2020 to March 2020. We collected data on demographics, comorbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, treatment methods, outcomes, and complications. Patients were divided into a recovered group and a deceased group. We compared the differences between the 2 groups and analyzed risk factors influencing the treatment effect. RESULTS Seventy-six patients recovered and 21 died. The average age and body mass index (BMI) of the deceased group were significantly higher than those of the recovered group (69.81±6.80 years vs 60.79±11.28 years, P<0.001 and 24.95±3.14 kg/m² vs 23.09±2.97 kg/m², P=0.014, respectively). The combination of antiviral drugs and supportive therapy appears to be associated with the lowest mortality (P<0.05). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that age, BMI, H-CRP, shock, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were independent risk factors for patients with COVID-19 (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients and those with a high BMI, as well as patients who experience shock and ARDS, may have a higher risk of death from COVID-19. The combination of antiviral drugs and supportive therapy appears to be associated with lower mortality, although further research is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Shock/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy , Treatment Outcome , gamma-Globulins/therapeutic use
6.
J Intensive Care Med ; 36(5): 511-523, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1029763

ABSTRACT

Point-of-Care (POC) transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is transforming the management of patients with cirrhosis presenting with septic shock, acute kidney injury, hepatorenal syndrome and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) by correctly assessing the hemodynamic and volume status at the bedside using combined echocardiography and POC ultrasound (POCUS). When POC TTE is performed by the hepatologist or intensivist in the intensive care unit (ICU), and interpreted remotely by a cardiologist, it can rule out cardiovascular conditions that may be contributing to undifferentiated shock, such as diastolic dysfunction, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, regional wall motion abnormalities and pulmonary embolism. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a delay in seeking medical treatment, reduced invasive interventions and deferment in referrals leading to "collateral damage" in critically ill patients with liver disease. Thus, the use of telemedicine in the ICU (Tele-ICU) has integrated cardiology, intensive care, and hepatology practices across the spectrum of ICU, operating room, and transplant healthcare. Telecardiology tools have improved bedside diagnosis when introduced as part of COVID-19 care by remote supervision and interpretation of POCUS and echocardiographic data. In this review, we present the contemporary approach of using POC echocardiography and offer a practical guide for primary care hepatologists and gastroenterologists for cardiac assessment in critically ill patients with cirrhosis and ACLF. Evidenced based use of Tele-ICU can prevent delay in cardiac diagnosis, optimize safe use of expert resources and ensure timely care in the setting of critically ill cirrhosis, ACLF and liver transplantation in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure , COVID-19 , Critical Care , Echocardiography/methods , Liver Cirrhosis , Point-of-Care Systems , Remote Consultation , Shock , Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure/etiology , Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure/physiopathology , Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiology/trends , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/organization & administration , Critical Illness/therapy , Delayed Diagnosis/prevention & control , Hemodynamic Monitoring/instrumentation , Hemodynamic Monitoring/methods , Humans , Infection Control , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/physiopathology , Liver Cirrhosis/therapy , Organizational Innovation , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/diagnosis , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy
7.
Circulation ; 143(1): 21-32, 2021 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to document cardiovascular clinical findings, cardiac imaging, and laboratory markers in children presenting with the novel multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: This real-time internet-based survey has been endorsed by the Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiologists Working Groups for Cardiac Imaging and Cardiovascular Intensive Care. Children 0 to 18 years of age admitted to a hospital between February 1 and June 6, 2020, with a diagnosis of an inflammatory syndrome and acute cardiovascular complications were included. RESULTS: A total of 286 children from 55 centers in 17 European countries were included. The median age was 8.4 years (interquartile range, 3.8-12.4 years) and 67% were boys. The most common cardiovascular complications were shock, cardiac arrhythmias, pericardial effusion, and coronary artery dilatation. Reduced left ventricular ejection fraction was present in over half of the patients, and a vast majority of children had raised cardiac troponin when checked. The biochemical markers of inflammation were raised in most patients on admission: elevated C-reactive protein, serum ferritin, procalcitonin, N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide, interleukin-6 level, and D-dimers. There was a statistically significant correlation between degree of elevation in cardiac and biochemical parameters and the need for intensive care support (P<0.05). Polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was positive in 33.6%, whereas immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies were positive in 15.7% cases and immunoglobulin G in 43.6% cases, respectively, when checked. One child in the study cohort died. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac involvement is common in children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with the Covid-19 pandemic. The majority of children have significantly raised levels of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide, ferritin, D-dimers, and cardiac troponin in addition to high C-reactive protein and procalcitonin levels. In comparison with adults with COVID-19, mortality in children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome associated with COVID-19 is uncommon despite multisystem involvement, very elevated inflammatory markers, and the need for intensive care support.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac , COVID-19 , Pericardial Effusion , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/blood , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Infant , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Pandemics , Peptide Fragments/blood , Pericardial Effusion/blood , Pericardial Effusion/epidemiology , Pericardial Effusion/etiology , Pericardial Effusion/therapy , Shock/blood , Shock/epidemiology , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy
8.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 60(2): 911-917, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were (i) to describe the clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally related to Sars-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) in children; (ii) to propose a framework to guide multidisciplinary team (MDT) management; and (iii) to highlight the role of the paediatric rheumatologist in this context. METHODS: This study involved a retrospective case notes review of patients referred to a single specialist paediatric centre with suspected PIMS-TS, with a focus on clinical presentation, laboratory parameters, treatment, and outcome in the context of an MDT framework. RESULTS: Nineteen children of median age 9.1 years fulfilled the definition of PIMS-TS and were managed within an MDT framework: 5/19 were female; 14/19 were of Black, Asian or minority ethnicity; 9/19 also fulfilled diagnostic criteria for complete or incomplete Kawasaki disease (KD). Severe systemic inflammation, shock, and abdominal pain were ubiquitous. Treatment was stratified within an MDT framework and included CSs in all; i.v. immunoglobulin in all; anakinra in 4/19; infliximab in 1/19; and antiviral (aciclovir) in 4/19. CONCLUSIONS: We observed significant diagnostic equipoise using a current definition of PIMS-TS, overlapping with KD. Outside of clinical trials, an MDT approach is vital. The role of the paediatric rheumatologist is to consider differential diagnoses of hyperinflammation in the young, to advise on empiric immunomodulatory therapy, to set realistic therapeutic targets, to gauge therapeutic success, to oversee timely step-down of immunomodulation, and to contribute to the longer-term MDT follow-up of any late inflammatory sequelae.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/therapy , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Shock/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Acyclovir/therapeutic use , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Child , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Inflammation , Infliximab/therapeutic use , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Male , Patient Care Team , Physician's Role , Retrospective Studies , Rheumatologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Shock/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , United Kingdom
9.
Indian J Med Res ; 151(5): 401-410, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890475

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with its early origin from Wuhan city in China has evolved into a global pandemic. Maximal precautionary measures and resources have been put forward by most nations in war footing to mitigate transmission and decrease fatality rates. This article was aimed to review the evidence on clinical management and to deal with the identification of high-risk groups, warning signs, appropriate investigations, proper sample collection for confirmation, general and specific treatment measures, strategies as well as infection control in the healthcare settings. Advanced age, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and cancer have been found to be the risk factors for severe disease. Fever lasting for >five days with tachypnoea, tachycardia or hypotension are indications for urgent attention and hospitalization in a patient with suspected COVID-19. At present, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from the upper respiratory tract samples is the diagnostic test of choice. While many drugs have shown in vitro activity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), there are insufficient clinical data to promote or dissuade their usage. Among the currently available drugs, hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir may be considered for patients with severe COVID-19 infection, awaiting further clinical trials. Stringent droplet and contact precautions will protect healthcare workers against most clinical exposures to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Airway Management , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , Pandemics , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/therapy , Specimen Handling , Symptom Assessment , Vulnerable Populations
10.
Chest ; 158(6): e267-e268, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-860852

ABSTRACT

Systemic capillary leak syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by dysfunctional inflammatory response, endothelial dysfunction, and extravasation of fluid from the vascular space to the interstitial space leading to shock, hemoconcentration, hypoalbuminemia, and subsequent organ failure. The condition may be idiopathic or secondary to an underlying cause, which can include viral infections. Here we describe a patient with acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection who presented with hemoconcentration, shock, and hypoalbuminemia. The patient subsequently developed rhabdomyolysis and compartment syndrome of all four extremities, requiring fasciotomies. This is the first reported case of systemic capillary leak syndrome associated with COVID-19 infection. This case adds to the evolving spectrum of inflammatory effects associated with this viral infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Capillary Leak Syndrome/physiopathology , Compartment Syndromes/physiopathology , Hypoalbuminemia/physiopathology , Shock/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Acidosis, Lactic/etiology , Acidosis, Lactic/physiopathology , Acidosis, Lactic/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Capillary Leak Syndrome/etiology , Compartment Syndromes/etiology , Compartment Syndromes/surgery , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Crystalloid Solutions/therapeutic use , Edema/etiology , Edema/physiopathology , Fasciotomy , Fatal Outcome , Fluid Therapy , Hematocrit , Humans , Hypoalbuminemia/etiology , Hypoalbuminemia/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Rhabdomyolysis/etiology , Rhabdomyolysis/physiopathology , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
11.
Simul Healthc ; 15(6): 447-448, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811140

ABSTRACT

STATEMENT: The dramatic outbreak of COVID-19 placed unprecedented strain on the critical care workforce of New York City. The enhanced precautions required to safely care for COVID-19 patients impacted the performance of even routine critical care procedures. Meanwhile, staff were stretched to care for exponentially rising case volume as COVID intensive care units (ICUs) expanded. Simulation was used to bridge these gaps-first to familiarize personnel within the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care with revised COVID-19 care procedures, then to orient noncritical care clinicians volunteering from other specialties for COVID ICU deployment to general critical care and COVID-19 care principles. Using mannequin-based simulation scenarios followed by comprehensive debriefing sessions, simulation participants received high-intensity, high-fidelity training in respiratory failure, circulatory failure, bedside ultrasound, bedside ICU procedures, and elements of COVID-19-specific care. More than 200 physicians and advanced practice practitioners completed simulation training in preparation for deployment, supplementing and enhancing the ICU workforce at a decisive time during the outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , High Fidelity Simulation Training/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Critical Care/standards , Humans , Intensive Care Units/standards , Manikins , Pandemics , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/therapy
12.
Crit Care Med ; 48(6): e440-e469, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of a rapidly spreading illness, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), affecting thousands of people around the world. Urgent guidance for clinicians caring for the sickest of these patients is needed. METHODS: We formed a panel of 36 experts from 12 countries. All panel members completed the World Health Organization conflict of interest disclosure form. The panel proposed 53 questions that are relevant to the management of COVID-19 in the ICU. We searched the literature for direct and indirect evidence on the management of COVID-19 in critically ill patients in the ICU. We identified relevant and recent systematic reviews on most questions relating to supportive care. We assessed the certainty in the evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, then generated recommendations based on the balance between benefit and harm, resource and cost implications, equity, and feasibility. Recommendations were either strong or weak, or in the form of best practice recommendations. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign COVID-19 panel issued 54 statements, of which four are best practice statements, nine are strong recommendations, and 35 are weak recommendations. No recommendation was provided for six questions. The topics were: 1) infection control, 2) laboratory diagnosis and specimens, 3) hemodynamic support, 4) ventilatory support, and 5) COVID-19 therapy. CONCLUSION: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign COVID-19 panel issued several recommendations to help support healthcare workers caring for critically ill ICU patients with COVID-19. When available, we will provide new evidence in further releases of these guidelines.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/standards , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Intensive Care Units/standards , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/therapy
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(29): e20998, 2020 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-683656

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic inflammatory disease. Standard imaging features of KD include interstitial and lobular inflammatory lesions in the lungs, while KD shock syndrome (KDSS), complicated with substantial consolidation and atelectasis in the lung, is rarely reported. PATIENTS CONCERNS: Herein, we report a single case of a 5-year-old female patient who manifested KDSS on the seventh day of the course of KD. Chest enhanced computed tomography indicated large-area consolidation in the lower lobes of the bilateral lungs. DIAGNOSIS: The patient was diagnosed with KDSS complicated with non-infective lung consolidation. INTERVENTIONS: The patient received human intravenous immunoglobulin (2 g/kg) and aspirin (30-50 mg/kgd), methylprednisolone, a vasoactive agent, and albumin. Infective factors were excluded. OUTCOMES: The consolidation in the lower lobe of the bilateral lungs was completely recovered after 3 days of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Children with KDSS may present with pulmonary lesions such as substantial consolidation and atelectasis; thus, infective factors should be excluded. If there is no etiological evidence, antibiotics should be used with caution.


Subject(s)
Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/complications , Pulmonary Atelectasis/etiology , Shock/etiology , Child, Preschool , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/therapy , Norepinephrine/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Atelectasis/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Atelectasis/therapy , Shock/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
14.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 183(1): G9-G15, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647341

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has changed the nature of medical consultations, emphasizing virtual patient counseling, with relevance for patients with diabetes insipidus (DI) or hyponatraemia. The main complication of desmopressin treatment in DI is dilutional hyponatraemia. Since plasma sodium monitoring is not always possible in times of COVID-19, we recommend to delay the desmopressin dose once a week until aquaresis occurs allowing excess retained water to be excreted. Patients should measure their body weight daily. Patients with DI admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 have a high risk for mortality due to volume depletion. Specialists must supervise fluid replacement and dosing of desmopressin. Patients after pituitary surgery should drink to thirst and measure their body weight daily to early recognize the development of the postoperative syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD). They should know hyponatraemia symptoms. The prevalence of hyponatraemia in patients with pneumonia due to COVID-19 is not yet known, but seems to be low. In contrast, hypernatraemia may develop in COVID-19 patients in ICU, from different multifactorial reasons, for example, due to insensible water losses from pyrexia, increased respiration rate and use of diuretics. Hypernatraemic dehydration may contribute to the high risk of acute kidney injury in COVID-19. IV fluid replacement should be administered with caution in severe cases of COVID-19 because of the risk of pulmonary oedema.


Subject(s)
Antidiuretic Agents/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Deamino Arginine Vasopressin/administration & dosage , Diabetes Insipidus, Neurogenic/therapy , Fluid Therapy/methods , Hypernatremia/therapy , Hyponatremia/therapy , Inappropriate ADH Syndrome/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Brain Injuries/complications , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Dehydration/therapy , Diabetes Insipidus/complications , Diabetes Insipidus/therapy , Diabetes Insipidus, Neurogenic/complications , Disease Management , Humans , Hyponatremia/etiology , Hyponatremia/prevention & control , Hypotonic Solutions/therapeutic use , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Saline Solution/therapeutic use , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy
15.
Pediatr Res ; 88(5): 705-716, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635228

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fewer children than adults have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the clinical manifestations are distinct from those of adults. Some children particularly those with acute or chronic co-morbidities are likely to develop critical illness. Recently, a multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) has been described in children with some of these patients requiring care in the pediatric ICU. METHODS: An international collaboration was formed to review the available evidence and develop evidence-based guidelines for the care of critically ill children with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Where the evidence was lacking, those gaps were replaced with consensus-based guidelines. RESULTS: This process has generated 44 recommendations related to pediatric COVID-19 patients presenting with respiratory distress or failure, sepsis or septic shock, cardiopulmonary arrest, MIS-C, those requiring adjuvant therapies, or ECMO. Evidence to explain the milder disease patterns in children and the potential to use repurposed anti-viral drugs, anti-inflammatory or anti-thrombotic therapies are also described. CONCLUSION: Brief summaries of pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection in different regions of the world are included since few registries are capturing this data globally. These guidelines seek to harmonize the standards and strategies for intensive care that critically ill children with COVID-19 receive across the world. IMPACT: At the time of publication, this is the latest evidence for managing critically ill children infected with SARS-CoV-2. Referring to these guidelines can decrease the morbidity and potentially the mortality of children effected by COVID-19 and its sequalae. These guidelines can be adapted to both high- and limited-resource settings.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/standards , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , Africa/epidemiology , Americas/epidemiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/standards , Child , Child, Preschool , Combined Modality Therapy , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care/methods , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Europe/epidemiology , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/standards , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial/standards , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/etiology , Shock/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy
17.
J Korean Med Sci ; 35(22): e210, 2020 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-574614

ABSTRACT

We report a rapidly deteriorating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patient, a-58-year-old woman, with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock with hyperpyrexia up to 41.8°C, probably due to the cytokine storm syndrome. Considering extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as the last resort, we applied therapeutic temperature modulation for management of hyperpyrexia. The patient demonstrated rapid improvement in oxygenation and shock after achieving normothermia, and fully recovered from COVID-19 three weeks later. Therapeutic temperature modulation may have successfully offloaded the failing cardiorespiratory system from metabolic cost and hyperinflammation induced by hyperpyrexia. The therapeutic temperature modulation can safely be applied in a specific group of patients with cytokine storm syndrome and hyperpyrexia, which may reduce the number of patients requiring ECMO in the global medical resource shortage.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cryotherapy/methods , Fever/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/therapy
18.
Zhonghua Jie He He Hu Xi Za Zhi ; 43(4): 277-281, 2020 Apr 12.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2875

ABSTRACT

The treatment of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) faces compelling challenges. In this issue, we'd like to share our first-line treatment experience in treating COVID-19. Hemodynamics need be closely monitored and different types of shock should be distinguished. Vasoconstrictor drugs should be used rationally and alerting of complications is of the same importance. The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) needs to be assessed, and effective prevention should be carried out for high-risk patients. It is necessary to consider the possibility of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) in patients with sudden onset of oxygenation deterioration, respiratory distress, reduced blood pressure. However, comprehensive analysis of disease state should be taken into the interpretation of abnormally elevated D-Dimer. Nutritional support is the basis of treatment. It's important to establish individual therapy regimens and to evaluate, monitor and adjust dynamically. Under the current epidemic situation, convalescent plasma can only be used empirically, indications need to be strictly screened, the blood transfusion process should be closely monitored and the curative effect should be dynamically evaluated.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Blood Transfusion , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Critical Illness , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Hemodynamics , Humans , Nutritional Support , Pandemics , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock/diagnosis , Shock/therapy , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
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