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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264644, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with high-consequence infectious diseases (HCID) are rare in Western Europe. However, high-level isolation units (HLIU) must always be prepared for patient admission. Case fatality rates of HCID can be reduced by providing optimal intensive care management. We here describe a single centre's preparation, its embedding in the national context and the challenges we faced during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. METHODS: Ten team leaders organize monthly whole day trainings for a team of doctors and nurses from the HLIU focusing on intensive care medicine. Impact and relevance of training are assessed by a questionnaire and a perception survey, respectively. Furthermore, yearly exercises with several partner institutions are performed to cover different real-life scenarios. Exercises are evaluated by internal and external observers. Both training sessions and exercises are accompanied by intense feedback. RESULTS: From May 2017 monthly training sessions were held with a two-month and a seven-month break due to the first and second wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, respectively. Agreement with the statements of the questionnaire was higher after training compared to before training indicating a positive effect of training sessions on competence. Participants rated joint trainings for nurses and doctors at regular intervals as important. Numerous issues with potential for improvement were identified during post processing of exercises. Action plans for their improvement were drafted and as of now mostly implemented. The network of the permanent working group of competence and treatment centres for HCID (Ständiger Arbeitskreis der Kompetenz- und Behandlungszentren für Krankheiten durch hochpathogene Erreger (STAKOB)) at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI) was strengthened throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Adequate preparation for the admission of patients with HCID is challenging. We show that joint regular trainings of doctors and nurses are appreciated and that training sessions may improve perceived skills. We also show that real-life scenario exercises may reveal additional deficits, which cannot be easily disclosed in training sessions. Although the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic interfered with our activities the enhanced cooperation among German HLIU during the pandemic ensured constant readiness for the admission of HCID patients to our or to collaborating HLIU. This is a single centre's experience, which may not be generalized to other centres. However, we believe that our work may address aspects that should be considered when preparing a unit for the admission of patients with HCID. These may then be adapted to the local situations.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Environment Design , Germany/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Workflow
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 206, 2022 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since 2014, the Government of Bihar and CARE India have implemented a nurse mentoring program that utilizes PRONTO International's simulation and team trainings to improve obstetric and neonatal care. Together they trained simulation educators known as Nurse Mentor Supervisors to conduct simulation trainings in rural health facilities across the state. Sustaining the knowledge and engagement of these simulation educators at a large-scale has proven difficult and resource intensive. To address this, the University of Utah with PRONTO International and with input from the University of California San Francisco, created an interactive, virtual education module based on a comic superhero named Super Divya to reinforce simulation educator concepts. This study examined the perceptions of Nurse Mentor Supervisors on Super Divya's accessibility, usefulness, and potential after implementation of Super Divya: Origin Story. METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews with 17 Nurse Mentor Supervisors in Bihar, India. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, interviews were conducted virtually via Zoom™ using a semi-structured interview guide in Hindi and English. Participants were identified with strict inclusion criteria and convenience sampling methods. Interviews were analyzed using a framework analysis. RESULTS: Nurse Mentor Supervisors found Super Divya to be engaging, innovative, relatable, and useful in teaching tips and tricks for simulation training. Supervisors thought the platform was largely accessible with some concerns around internet connectivity and devices. The majority reacted positively to the idea of distributing Super Divya to other simulation educators in the nurse mentoring program and had suggestions for additional clinical and simulation educator training topics. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potential of Super Divya to engage simulation educators in continuous education. At a time when virtual education is increasingly important and in-person training was halted by the COVID-19 pandemic, Super Divya engaged Supervisors in the nurse mentoring program. We have incorporated suggestions for improvement of Super Divya into future modules. Further research can help understand how knowledge from Super Divya can improve simulation facilitation skills and behaviors, and explore potential for reinforcing clinical skills via this platform. ETHICAL APPROVAL: This study was approved by the institutional review board at the University of California San Francisco (IRB # 20-29902).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Mentors , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Simulation Training/methods
3.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 16, 2022 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To support the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the World Health Organization and its partners developed an interactive virtual learning initiative through which vaccination stakeholders could receive the latest guidance, ask questions, and share their experiences. This initiative, implemented between 9 February 2021 and 15 June 2021, included virtual engagement between technical experts and participants during a 15-session interactive webinar series as well as web and text-messaging discussions in English and French. METHODS: This article uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze survey data collected following each webinar and a post-series survey conducted after the series had concluded. Participant data were tracked for each session, and feedback surveys were conducted after each session to gauge experience quality and content usability. Chi-square tests were used to compare results across professions (health workers, public health practitioners, and others). RESULTS: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity webinar series reached participants in 179 countries or 93% of the WHO Member States; 75% of participants were from low- and middle-income countries. More than 60% of participants reported using the resources provided during the sessions, and 47% reported sharing these resources with colleagues. More than 79% of participants stated that this initiative significantly improved their confidence in preparing for and rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations; an additional 20% stated that the initiative "somewhat" improved their confidence. In the post-series survey, 70% of participants reported that they will "definitely use" the knowledge derived from this learning series in their work; an additional 20% will "probably use" and 9% would "possibly use" this knowledge in their work. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity learning initiative used a digital model of dynamic, interactive learning at scale. The initiative enhanced WHO's ability to disseminate knowledge, provide normative guidance, and share best practices to COVID-19 vaccination stakeholders in real time. This approach allowed WHO to hear the information needs of stakeholders and respond by developing guidance, tools, and training to support COVID-19 vaccine introduction. WHO and its partners can learn from this capacity-building experience and apply best practices for digital interactive learning to other health programs moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Simulation Training , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736901

ABSTRACT

To improve the quality of intrapartum care in public health facilities of Bihar, India, a statewide quality improvement program was implemented. Nurses participated in simulation sessions to improve their clinical, teamwork, and communication skills. Nurse mentors, tasked with facilitating these sessions, received training in best practices. To support the mentors in the on-going facilitation of these trainings, we developed a digital, interactive, comic series starring "Super Divya", a simulation facilitation superhero. The objective of these modules was to reinforce key concepts of simulation facilitation in a less formal and more engaging way than traditional didactic lessons. This virtual platform offers the flexibility to watch modules frequently and at preferred times. This pilot study involved 205 simulation educators who were sent one module at a time. Shortly before sending the first module, nurses completed a baseline knowledge survey, followed by brief surveys after each module to assess change in knowledge. Significant improvements in knowledge were observed across individual scores from baseline to post-survey. A majority found Super Divya modules to be acceptable and feasible to use as a learning tool. However, a few abstract concepts in the modules were not well-understood, suggesting that more needs to be done to communicate their core meaning of these concepts.


Subject(s)
Mentors , Simulation Training , Communication , Humans , Pilot Projects , Quality Improvement
5.
Am J Emerg Med ; 48: 370-371, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734127
6.
GMS J Med Educ ; 39(1): Doc6, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725322

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pain medicine is located in different sections of the medical curriculum. In the pandemic situation, an online teaching concept for Q14 which includes several disciplines had to be developed. The goal of the project was to create a fully digitized learning platform for the cross-sectional area Q14 that allows all participating disciplines to address the various learning goals without losing a practical component. Project description: First, the students' expectations regarding education in the field of pain medicine were recorded by means of a survey among medical students. Based on this, a teaching module in a blended learning format was developed, which consisted of two parts. Within a digital learning platform, students were first required to complete consecutive learning units using an interactive learning management system. This was followed by a presence phase (online ZOOM seminar) in which, under the guidance of teaching staff, the therapy suggestions of the individual case studies from the previous learning program were reflected. In the second part, the acquired knowledge was applied to a simulated patient. An evaluation of the online module was carried out through free-text answers and self-assessment of the completion time. The ZOOM seminar was evaluated on the basis of an assessment by the teachers. Results: The survey among students revealed a desire for practical training without "frontal teaching". The resulting project realized this aspect by teaching theory during an online module with case vignettes and interactive learning tasks. The subsequent online presence time during the ZOOM meeting enabled the students to repeat and deepen contents and to ask questions. 170 students completed the entire online program, of which evaluation data were available for 75 students. Self-assessment of completion time averaged at 4-6 hours. In the feedback, 90 aspects were addressed, including mainly comments on content (43%), praise (33%) and comments on technical problems (23%). According to the assessment of the presenters, the students were able to carry out the pain anamnesis survey in a structured manner. The submission of the therapy proposal, however, represents a particular hurdle. Conclusion: With the presented blended learning concept it is possible to address the different learning goals and the interdisciplinarity of Q14 sufficiently. After further processing and improvement of the project, a controlled and more extensive collection of evaluation data is required to further investigate the benefit of the platform for the students regarding achievement of defined learning goals.


Subject(s)
Simulation Training , Students, Medical , Humans , Motivation , Pain , Pandemics
7.
Simul Healthc ; 15(6): 373-374, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722751
8.
Braz J Anesthesiol ; 72(2): 185-188, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1670226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based education has become the most important part of resident training in anesthesiology, especially during the pandemic. It allows learning the skills and the management of different situations without putting residents in risk of contamination, considering COVID-19 is highly contagious. The hypothesis was that simulation is still associated with improvement of knowledge acquisitions despite the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Residents of anesthesiology and intensive care subjected to an anaphylaxis simulation scenario. Their knowledge levels were assessed by true/false questions before and one month after the simulation session. The STAI test was used to measure anxiety levels before and after the scenario. Data were analyzed statistically using Wilcoxon and McNemar tests. RESULTS: Junior residents (< 2 years) received significantly higher scores in post-training theoretical tests compared to their pre-training scores (79.2 ± 9.6, 84.5 ± 8.2, p = 0.002, n = 21). There was no difference between pre- and post-test scores of seniors (80.2 ± 9, 81.8 ± 10.4, p = 0.3). Pre- and post-anxiety inventory scores were nearly the same and both were in the moderate group (39.8 ± 10.1, 39.3 ± 12.1, p = 0.8). CONCLUSION: Simulation-based education improved the knowledge levels of the residents without raising anxiety levels. Thus, simulation-based training showed its value as an important tool of education during the pandemic, which needs to be further popularized for training at all institutions. Enlightening medical educators about this accomplished teaching method may lead to improved quality of medical education in developing countries and reshape how tomorrow's doctors are trained during pandemics.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Simulation Training , Anesthesiology/education , Clinical Competence , Humans , Operating Rooms , Pandemics
9.
Nurse Educ Today ; 110: 105273, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1652665

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite a global pandemic with social distancing regulations, nurses must continue to participate in continuing education to ensure competency for the care they provide. Mock codes are common yearly competencies that nurses must participate in to grow their critical thinking and show mastery of the skills. Maintaining mock codes which were usually in person, became a struggle in order to comply with social distancing. METHOD: A virtual escape room mock code was implemented as a substitute for in-person education to sustain continued education during a time of social distancing. The aim was to determine if the virtual sessions met the perceived expectations of the nurses in comparison to previous in-person sessions. The session was designed based upon the Community of Inquiry framework for participants to work together in a meaningful capacity. After completion of the session, a survey which included an adaption of the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Survey, was disseminated to pediatric and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) nurses to gauge their satisfaction and perceptions compared to an in-person method. RESULTS: Results indicated that the nurses felt satisfaction and self-confidence in learning and that virtual session provided equal education as compared to previous in-person sessions. CONCLUSION: The virtual escape room mock code engaged the nursing staff in an interactive educational opportunity which fulfilled their annual competency requirement.


Subject(s)
Physical Distancing , Simulation Training , Child , Humans , Learning
10.
Surg Endosc ; 36(2): 1444-1455, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based surgical training (SBST) is key to securing future surgical expertise. Proficiency-based training (PBT) in laparoscopy has shown promising results on skills transfer. However, time constraints and limited possibilities for distributed training constitute barriers to effective PBT. Home-based training may provide a solution to these barriers and may be a feasible alternative to centralized training in times of assembly constraints. METHODS: We randomly assigned first-year trainees in abdominal surgery, gynecology, and urology to either centralized instructor-regulated training (CIRT) or home-based self-regulated training (HSRT) in laparoscopy. All participants trained on portable box trainers providing feedback on metrics and possibility for video reviewing. Training in both groups was structured as PBT with graded proficiency exercises adopted from the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS). The HSRT group trained at home guided by online learning materials, while the CIRT group attended two training sessions in the simulation center with feedback from experienced instructors. Performance tests consisted of hand-eye and bimanual coordination, suture and knot-tying, and FLS exercises. We analyzed passing rates, training time and distribution, and test performances. RESULTS: Passing rates were 87% and 96% in the CIRT and HSRT group, respectively. HSRT facilitated distributed training and resulted in greater variation in training times. Task times for hand-eye and bimanual coordination were significantly reduced between pretest and posttest in both groups. Trainees maintained their posttest performances at the 6-month retention test. Our analyses revealed no significant inter-group differences in performances at pretest, posttest, or retention test. Performance improvements in the two groups followed similar patterns. CONCLUSION: CIRT and HSRT in laparoscopy result in comparable performance improvements. HSRT in laparoscopy is a feasible and effective alternative to CIRT when offered inside a supportive instructional design. Further research is needed to clarify trainees' preferences and explore facilitators and barriers to HSRT.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Laparoscopy , Simulation Training , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Humans , Laparoscopy/education , Simulation Training/methods
12.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e056599, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613011

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic forced hospital organisation and healthcare professionals to prepare for large quantities of patients in isolation rooms. In situ simulation may seem promising in order to manage the organisational changes that the pandemic require. This study aims to investigate in situ simulations influence on healthcare professional's self-perceived preparedness to face the pandemic. DESIGN: A qualitative focus group study. SETTING: We conducted full scale in situ simulations over a 3-week period in April 2020, including 277 healthcare professionals, at a Danish University Hospital. Subsequently, six semistructured focus group interviews, including 22 participants from the simulations, were conducted in May 2020. PARTICIPANTS: 22 healthcare professionals participated in the focus group interviews. METHODS: The simulations consisted of a briefing, two scenarios focusing on acute respiratory insufficiency and correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and a debriefing. We conducted six focus group interviews using comparable semistructured interview guides focusing on the organisational restructuring of the departments and outcomes of the needs-driven simulation-based programme. We used thematic analysis to identify main themes. RESULTS: The informants perceived that the simulations resulted in positive experiences for the healthcare professionals and perceived the organisational changes as effective. They highlighted that simulation enhanced teamwork, demystified the COVID-19 disease, and improved skills, in correct use of PPE and acute treatment of COVID-19 patients. Data revealed that a predefined simulation task force including both experienced simulators and medical experts for facilitation of in situ simulation would be beneficial. CONCLUSION: In situ simulation may be useful to enhance learning on organisation and individual level during a pandemic. This educational activity could serve an important role in facilitating hospital preparation and education of large numbers of healthcare professionals during a healthcare crisis. Introduction of a simulation task force is suggested to handle coordination and rapid enrolment across the hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Delivery of Health Care , Denmark , Focus Groups , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 32(3): 462-470, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594747

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the COVID-19 disease as a global pandemic caused major challenges and strained busy operating room environments. This required institutions to rethink current system functioning and urgently develop safe medical practices and protocols. PURPOSE: To use a novel approach combining simulation-based clinical system testing with rapid cycle deliberate practice concepts for identifying latent safety threats presented by newly developed operating room COVID-19 protocols and collecting frontline staff recommendations for mitigation. METHODS: This study design combined a training/education approach with probing the systems function. The primary outcomes were the number of latent safety threats and staff evaluations of this approach for feasibility and utility on immediate and four-month post surveys. Participants started the simulation which took place in the operating room, in the assistant role before graduating to the primary airway manager. Simulation staff members observed the simulations and noted whether elements in the protocols/checklists were followed and whether latent safety threats were present using an observation form. Solutions to latent safety threats were sought during the debriefing period. RESULTS: This approach identified 17 latent safety threats not foreseen during the planning stages and allowed for corrections to the protocols prior to impacting patient outcomes. Post-simulation surveys indicated that the program was well received and all who responded agreed that it was worth the time it took. Fifty-seven percent of respondents to four-month follow-up survey reported using the work products to care for an actual COVID-19 patient. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated a flexible methodology that effectively integrated simulation-based training and systems tests to train staff and detect latent safety threats in the new workflows and provide recommendations for mitigation. While COVID was the specific prompt, this approach can be applicable in diverse clinical settings for training medical staff, testing system function, and mitigating potential latent safety threats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Humans , Infection Control , Operating Rooms , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) ; 61(12): 750-757, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581498

ABSTRACT

The increase in minimally invasive surgery has led to a decrease in surgical experience. To date, there is only limited research examining whether skills are evaluated objectively and equally in simulation training, especially in microsurgery. The purpose of this study was to analyze the objectivity and equality of simulation evaluation results conducted in a contest format. A nationwide recruitment process was conducted to select study participants. Participants were recruited from a pool of qualified physicians with less than 10 years of experience. In this study, the simulation procedure consisted of incising a 1 mm thick blood vessel and suturing it with a 10-0 thread using a microscope. Initially, we planned to have the neurosurgical supervisors score the simulation procedure by direct observation. However, due to COVID-19, some study participants were unable to attend. Thus requiring some simulation procedures to be scored by video review. A total of 14 trainees participated in the study. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient among the scorers was 0.99, indicating a strong correlation. There was no statistically significant difference between the scores from the video review and direct observation judgments. There was a statistically significant difference (p <0.001) between the scores for some criteria. For the eight criteria, individual scorers assigned scores in a consistent pattern. However, this pattern differed between scorers indicating that some scorers were more lenient than others. The results indicate that both video review and direct observation methods are highly objective techniques evaluate simulation procedures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Anastomosis, Surgical , Clinical Competence , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Laryngol Otol ; 136(3): 197-207, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586114

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has led to a need for alternative teaching methods in facial plastics. This systematic review aimed to identify facial plastics simulation models, and assess their validity and efficacy as training tools. METHODS: Literature searches were performed. The Beckman scale was used for validity. The McGaghie Modified Translational Outcomes of Simulation-Based Mastery Learning score was used to evaluate effectiveness. RESULTS: Overall, 29 studies were selected. These simulated local skin flaps (n = 9), microtia frameworks (n = 5), pinnaplasty (n = 1), facial nerve anastomosis (n = 1), oculoplastic procedures (n = 5), and endoscopic septoplasty and septorhinoplasty simulators (n = 10). Of these models, 14 were deemed to be high-fidelity, 13 low-fidelity and 2 mixed-fidelity. None of the studies published common outcome measures. CONCLUSION: Simulators in facial plastic surgical training are important. These models may have some training benefits, but most could benefit from further assessment of validity.


Subject(s)
Models, Anatomic , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Simulation Training , Face , Humans
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(50): e27844, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583963

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, surgical training has become increasingly challenging due to required social distancing. Therefore, the use of virtual reality (VR)-simulation could be a helpful tool for imparting surgical skills, especially in minimally invasive environments. Visual spatial ability (VSA) might influence the learning curve for laparoscopic surgical skills. However, little is known about the influence of VSA for surgical novices on VR-simulator training regarding the complexity of different tasks over a long-term training period. Our study evaluated prior VSA and VSA development in surgical trainees during VR-simulator training, and its influence on surgical performance in simulator training. METHODS: In our single-center prospective two-arm randomized trial, VSA was measured with a tube figure test before curriculum training. After 1:1 randomization, the training group (TG) participated in the entire curriculum training consisting of 48 different VR-simulator tasks with varying difficulty over a continuous nine-day training session. The control group (CG) performed two of these tasks on day 1 and 9. Correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the influence of VSA on VR-related surgical skills and to measure procedural abilities. RESULTS: Sixty students (33 women) were included. Significant improvements in the TG in surgical performance and faster completion times were observed from days 1 to 9 for the scope orientation 30° right-handed (SOR), and cholecystectomy dissection tasks after the structured 9-day training program. After training, the TG with pre-existing low VSA scores achieved performance levels similar to those with pre-existing high VSA scores for the two VR simulator tasks. Significant correlations between VSA and surgical performance on complex laparoscopic camera navigation SOR tasks were found before training. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed that that all trainees improved their surgical skills irrespective of previous VSA during structured VR simulator training. An increase in VSA resulted in improvements in surgical performance and training progress, which was more distinct in complex simulator tasks. Further, we demonstrated a positive relationship between VSA and surgical performance of the TG, especially at the beginning of training. Our results identified pre-existing levels of VSA as a predictor of surgical performance.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Laparoscopy , Simulation Training , Spatial Navigation , Virtual Reality , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Laparoscopy/education , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , User-Computer Interface
17.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1892017, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575053

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telesimulation may allow simulationists to continue with essential simulation-based training programs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, we investigated the feasibility of telesimulation for neonatal resuscitation training, assessed participants' attitudes towards telesimulation as well as its effect on neonatal resuscitation knowledge, and compared results between medical students and neonatal nurses. Methods: For this prospective observational pilot study, medical students and neonatal nursing staff were recruited on a voluntary basis. Pre- and post-training knowledge was assessed using a 20-question questionnaire. Following the educational intervention, participants further answered a six-item questionnaire on their perception of telesimulation. For the telesimulation session, participants received a simulation package including a low-fidelity mannequin and medical equipment. The one-hour telesimulation session was delivered by an experienced instructor and broadcasted via Cisco Webex for groups of 2-3 participants, covering all elements of the neonatal resuscitation algorithm and including deliberate technical skills practice. Results: Nine medical students and nine neonatal nurses participated in a total of seven telesimulation sessions. In general, participants enjoyed the telesimulation session, acknowledged a positive learning effect and found telesimulation suitable for neonatal resuscitation training, but were critical of potential technical issues, training logistics, and the quality of supervision and feedback. Neonatal resuscitation knowledge scores increased significantly after the educational intervention both for medical students and nurses. Conclusions: Telesimulation is feasible for neonatal resuscitation training and associated with significant improvements in knowledge of current resuscitation guidelines, without differences between medical students and neonatal nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Resuscitation/education , Simulation Training/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Postgrad Med J ; 98(1155): 29-34, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575212

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Surgical career progression is determined by examination success and Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) outcome, yet data on organisational skills are sparse. This study aimed to determine whether organisational skills related to Core Surgical Training (CST) outcome. Primary outcome measures include operative experience, publications, examination success (Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons or the Diploma in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (MRCS/DO-HNS)) and ARCP outcome. METHODS: The study was conducted prospectively at three consecutive CST induction boot camps (2017-2019) providing clinical and simulation training for 125 trainees. Arrival time at course registration was the selected surrogate for organisational skills. Trainees were advised to arrive promptly at 8:45 for registration and that the course would start at 9:00. Trainee arrival times were grouped as follows: early (before 8:45), on time (8:45-8:59am) or late (after 9:00). Arrival times were compared with primary outcome measures. SETTING: Health Education and Improvement Wales' School of Surgery, UK. RESULTS: Median arrival time was 8:53 (range 7:55-10:03), with 29 trainees (23.2%) arriving early, 63 (50.4%) on-time and 33 (26.4%) late. Arrival time was associated with operative experience (early vs late; 206 vs 164 cases, p=0.012), publication (63.2% vs 18.5%, p=0.005), MRCS/DO-HNS success (44.8% vs 15.2%, p=0.029), ARCP outcome (86.2% vs 60.6% Outcome 1, p=0.053), but not National Training Number success (60.0% vs 53.3%, p=0.772). CONCLUSIONS: Better-prepared trainees achieved 25% more operative experience, were four-fold more likely to publish and pass MRCS, which aligned with consistent desirable ARCP outcome. Timely arrival at training events represents a skills-composite of travel planning and is a useful marker of strategic organisational skills.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Surgeons , Data Collection , Educational Status , Efficiency , Humans , Prospective Studies
20.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(4): 317-323, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526205

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic prompted the need for rapid, flexible change in the delivery of care, education, and commitment to the well-being of obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents. RECENT FINDINGS: Published literature shows multiple models for surge scheduling for residency programs in other specialties. We describe our experience creating a surge schedule for OB/GYN residents that allowed for sufficient coverage of inpatient care while minimizing resident exposure and limited hospital resources, respecting work hour requirements, and plans for coverage due to illness or need for home quarantine. We also report innovative approaches to trainee education through the use of remote-learning technology and gynecologic surgery skills training in absence of normal clinical exposure. SUMMARY: Our approach serves as a model for adapting to unprecedented challenges and offers suggestions for creative transformations of traditional teaching that can be continued beyond the immediate crisis.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Simulation Training , Videoconferencing
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