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1.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 19: 11, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865448

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures decreased in Indonesia. The existing commercial abdominal hysterectomy simulation model is expensive and difficult to reuse. This study compared residents' abdominal hysterectomy skills after simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following a video demonstration. METHODS: We randomized 3rd- and 4th-year obstetrics and gynecology residents to a video-based group (group 1), a simulation-based group (group 2), and a combination group (group 3). Abdominal hysterectomy skills were compared between before and after the educational intervention. The pre- and post-tests were scored by blinded experts using the validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Global Rating Scale (GRS). RESULTS: A total of 33 residents were included in the pre- and post-tests. The OSATS and GRS mean differences after the intervention were higher in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (OSATS: 4.64 [95% CI, 2.90-6.37] vs. 2.55 [95% CI, 2.19-2.90] vs. 3.82 [95% CI, 2.41-5.22], P=0.047; GRS: 10.00 [95% CI, 7.01-12.99] vs. 5.18 [95% CI, 3.99-6.38] vs. 7.18 [95% CI, 6.11-8.26], P=0.006). The 3rd-year residents in group 3 had greater mean differences in OSATS and GRS scores than the 4th-year residents (OSATS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.88-8.46]; GRS: 12.83 [95% CI, 8.61-17.05] vs. OSATS: 3.40 [95% CI, 0.83-5.97]; GRS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.80-8.54]). CONCLUSION: Simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following video demonstration can be a bridge to learning about abdominal hysterectomy for residents who had less surgical experience during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hysterectomy , Simulation Training , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Hysterectomy/education , Indonesia/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Manikins , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , Simulation Training/methods , Video Recording
2.
J Bras Pneumol ; 48(3): e20210361, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1836600

ABSTRACT

Bronchoscopy is an important procedure to examine the airways. It is traditionally taught by having trainees perform it in humans. This carries risks, albeit rarely, and causes stress to trainees. The objective of this study was to review bronchoscopy simulators, as well as their use in and impact on medical education, presenting perspectives on the use of simulators in the post-pandemic world. This review was based on articles published in English in 2000-2021 and retrieved from any of the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, SciELO, and Google Scholar. Bronchoscopy simulators have improved markedly over time, allowing the teaching/learning process to take place in a risk-free environment. Bronchoscopy simulation training is an interesting option for the evaluation of the airways, especially in the coming years, with the COVID-19 pandemic highlighting the need for continuing medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Simulation Training , Bronchoscopy , Computer Simulation , Humans , Pandemics , Simulation Training/methods
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 206, 2022 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since 2014, the Government of Bihar and CARE India have implemented a nurse mentoring program that utilizes PRONTO International's simulation and team trainings to improve obstetric and neonatal care. Together they trained simulation educators known as Nurse Mentor Supervisors to conduct simulation trainings in rural health facilities across the state. Sustaining the knowledge and engagement of these simulation educators at a large-scale has proven difficult and resource intensive. To address this, the University of Utah with PRONTO International and with input from the University of California San Francisco, created an interactive, virtual education module based on a comic superhero named Super Divya to reinforce simulation educator concepts. This study examined the perceptions of Nurse Mentor Supervisors on Super Divya's accessibility, usefulness, and potential after implementation of Super Divya: Origin Story. METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews with 17 Nurse Mentor Supervisors in Bihar, India. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, interviews were conducted virtually via Zoom™ using a semi-structured interview guide in Hindi and English. Participants were identified with strict inclusion criteria and convenience sampling methods. Interviews were analyzed using a framework analysis. RESULTS: Nurse Mentor Supervisors found Super Divya to be engaging, innovative, relatable, and useful in teaching tips and tricks for simulation training. Supervisors thought the platform was largely accessible with some concerns around internet connectivity and devices. The majority reacted positively to the idea of distributing Super Divya to other simulation educators in the nurse mentoring program and had suggestions for additional clinical and simulation educator training topics. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potential of Super Divya to engage simulation educators in continuous education. At a time when virtual education is increasingly important and in-person training was halted by the COVID-19 pandemic, Super Divya engaged Supervisors in the nurse mentoring program. We have incorporated suggestions for improvement of Super Divya into future modules. Further research can help understand how knowledge from Super Divya can improve simulation facilitation skills and behaviors, and explore potential for reinforcing clinical skills via this platform. ETHICAL APPROVAL: This study was approved by the institutional review board at the University of California San Francisco (IRB # 20-29902).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Simulation Training , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Mentors , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Simulation Training/methods
4.
Surg Endosc ; 36(2): 1444-1455, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based surgical training (SBST) is key to securing future surgical expertise. Proficiency-based training (PBT) in laparoscopy has shown promising results on skills transfer. However, time constraints and limited possibilities for distributed training constitute barriers to effective PBT. Home-based training may provide a solution to these barriers and may be a feasible alternative to centralized training in times of assembly constraints. METHODS: We randomly assigned first-year trainees in abdominal surgery, gynecology, and urology to either centralized instructor-regulated training (CIRT) or home-based self-regulated training (HSRT) in laparoscopy. All participants trained on portable box trainers providing feedback on metrics and possibility for video reviewing. Training in both groups was structured as PBT with graded proficiency exercises adopted from the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS). The HSRT group trained at home guided by online learning materials, while the CIRT group attended two training sessions in the simulation center with feedback from experienced instructors. Performance tests consisted of hand-eye and bimanual coordination, suture and knot-tying, and FLS exercises. We analyzed passing rates, training time and distribution, and test performances. RESULTS: Passing rates were 87% and 96% in the CIRT and HSRT group, respectively. HSRT facilitated distributed training and resulted in greater variation in training times. Task times for hand-eye and bimanual coordination were significantly reduced between pretest and posttest in both groups. Trainees maintained their posttest performances at the 6-month retention test. Our analyses revealed no significant inter-group differences in performances at pretest, posttest, or retention test. Performance improvements in the two groups followed similar patterns. CONCLUSION: CIRT and HSRT in laparoscopy result in comparable performance improvements. HSRT in laparoscopy is a feasible and effective alternative to CIRT when offered inside a supportive instructional design. Further research is needed to clarify trainees' preferences and explore facilitators and barriers to HSRT.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Laparoscopy , Simulation Training , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Humans , Laparoscopy/education , Simulation Training/methods
5.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1892017, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575053

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telesimulation may allow simulationists to continue with essential simulation-based training programs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, we investigated the feasibility of telesimulation for neonatal resuscitation training, assessed participants' attitudes towards telesimulation as well as its effect on neonatal resuscitation knowledge, and compared results between medical students and neonatal nurses. Methods: For this prospective observational pilot study, medical students and neonatal nursing staff were recruited on a voluntary basis. Pre- and post-training knowledge was assessed using a 20-question questionnaire. Following the educational intervention, participants further answered a six-item questionnaire on their perception of telesimulation. For the telesimulation session, participants received a simulation package including a low-fidelity mannequin and medical equipment. The one-hour telesimulation session was delivered by an experienced instructor and broadcasted via Cisco Webex for groups of 2-3 participants, covering all elements of the neonatal resuscitation algorithm and including deliberate technical skills practice. Results: Nine medical students and nine neonatal nurses participated in a total of seven telesimulation sessions. In general, participants enjoyed the telesimulation session, acknowledged a positive learning effect and found telesimulation suitable for neonatal resuscitation training, but were critical of potential technical issues, training logistics, and the quality of supervision and feedback. Neonatal resuscitation knowledge scores increased significantly after the educational intervention both for medical students and nurses. Conclusions: Telesimulation is feasible for neonatal resuscitation training and associated with significant improvements in knowledge of current resuscitation guidelines, without differences between medical students and neonatal nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Resuscitation/education , Simulation Training/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Nursing/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Learning , Male , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 193-199, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378940

ABSTRACT

Telesimulation (TS), the process of using the internet to link educators and trainees at locations remote from one another, harnesses the powers of technology to enable access to high-quality simulation-based education and assessment to learners across the globe. From its first uses in the teaching and assessment of laparoscopic skills to more recent interpretations during the current pandemic, TS has shown promise in helping educators to address pressing dilemmas in medical education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Simulation Training/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Educational Technology , Global Health , Humans , International Cooperation , Internet
10.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(4): 270-272, 2021 08.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325945

ABSTRACT

In patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, endotracheal intubation is a procedure with a high risk for transmission. A videolaryngoscopy is a supplementary level of health care provider protection, but commercial videolaryngoscopes are expensive and not always available in pediatric intensive care units in Argentina. Our objective was to describe intubation practice using an infant head mannequin with a low-cost, handcrafted videolaryngoscope. Fifteen pediatricians with no prior experience using the device participated in an intubation practice in a head mannequin with a handcrafted videolaryngoscope. The average time for the first attempt was 116.4 seconds (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 84.8- 148.0) and, for the second one, 44.2 seconds (95 % CI: 27.7-60.6). Time decreased significantly for the second attempt (p: 0.0001). A successful intubation was achieved with the device in all attempts, and the procedure duration decreased with the second practice.


En pacientes con infección por SARS-CoV-2 la intubación endotraqueal es un procedimiento con riesgo elevado de contagio. La videolaringoscopia complementa la protección del profesional, pero los videolaringoscopios comerciales son caros y no siempre están disponibles en las terapias intensivas pediátricas argentinas. El objetivo fue describir la práctica de intubación en un modelo de cabeza de simulación de lactante con un videolaringoscopio artesanal de bajo costo. Quince pediatras sin experiencia previa con el dispositivo participaron de una práctica de intubación en una cabeza de simulación con un videolaringoscopio artesanal. El tiempo promedio del primer intento fue de 116,4 segundos (intervalo de confianza del 95 % [IC95 %]: 84,8-148,0) y, el del siguiente fue de 44,2 segundos (IC95 %: 27,7­60,6). El tiempo disminuyó de forma significativa en el segundo intento (p : 0,0001). El dispositivo permitió la intubación exitosa en todos los intentos acortando la duración del procedimiento en la segunda práctica.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/instrumentation , Laryngoscopes/economics , Laryngoscopy/education , Pediatrics/education , Simulation Training/methods , Argentina , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Health Care Costs , Humans , Infant , Internship and Residency/methods , Intubation, Intratracheal/economics , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Laryngoscopy/economics , Laryngoscopy/instrumentation , Laryngoscopy/methods , Learning Curve , Manikins , Pediatrics/economics , Time Factors , Video Recording
12.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 181-192, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303281

ABSTRACT

Innovations in surgical education follow advancing clinical technology. New surgical methods have prompted demand for systematic methods to leverage computing power and internet tools to achieve proficiency-based training goals. Virtual reality, high-fidelity patient simulation, web-based resources to facilitate performance assessment, and telementoring have become mainstream practices, although patient outcomes benefits are not well studied. Remote virtual meeting and mentoring have had transformative effects on resident experiences, the full effects of which remain to be seen.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Educational Technology , General Surgery/education , Inventions , Simulation Training/methods , Educational Measurement , Humans , Mentoring/methods , United States , Virtual Reality
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10945, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284704

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to determine the effect of a novel simulation-based training curriculum for scleral tunnel construction in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) compared with traditional training. In this multicenter, investigator-masked, randomized clinical trial, resident surgeons within 3 months of matriculation with minimal or no prior experience with MSICS were assigned either to simulation-based training, the Experimental Group (EG), or to conventional training, the Control Group (CG). EG residents were trained to perform scleral tunnel construction using a simulation-based curriculum (HelpMeSee Eye Surgery Simulator), while residents in the CG followed institution-specific curriculum before progressing to live surgery. Surgical videos of the first 20 attempts at tunnel construction were reviewed by masked video raters. The primary outcome was the total number of any of 9 pre-specified errors. On average, the total number of errors was 9.25 (95% CI 0-18.95) in the EG and 17.56 (95% CI 6.63-28.49) in the CG (P = 0.05); the number of major errors was 4.86 (95% CI 0.13-9.59) in the EG and 10.09 (95% CI 4.76-15.41) in the CG (P = 0.02); and the number of minor errors was 4.39 (95% CI 0-9.75) in the EG and 7.47 (95% CI 1.43-13.51) in the CG (P = 0.16). These results support that novice surgeons trained using the novel simulation-based curriculum performed fewer errors in their first 20 attempts at tunnel construction compared to those trained with a conventional curriculum.


Subject(s)
Cataract Extraction/methods , Simulation Training/methods , Virtual Reality , Adult , Curriculum , Equipment Design , Female , Humans , Intraoperative Complications/prevention & control , Learning Curve , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Sclera/surgery , Video Recording
14.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(5): 293-297, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A university school of nursing initiated a pilot project to include Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) students in two existing Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) student scenarios. The result was a valuable collaboration among the student learners. METHOD: Using a Zoom platform, students were introduced to their patient in a telehealth scenario. Students then encountered the same patient in an urgent care setting. The BSN student assessed the patient, then reported to the MSN student. The MSN student provided feedback and treatment orders. Individual BSN and MSN student pairs debriefed immediately after their scenarios and again at the end with other students and faculty. RESULTS: Evaluation was conducted using an adaptation of the Modified Simulation Evaluation Tool (SET-M) and free-text questions developed by nursing faculty. Both SET-M responses and written comments indicated students were satisfied with the simulation experience, and students' confidence and skills in communication and collaboration improved. CONCLUSION: This simulation was beneficial for both MSN and BSN students and will become an ongoing addition to the simulations. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(5):293-297.].


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Education, Nursing , Simulation Training , Students, Nursing , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pilot Projects , Simulation Training/methods , Simulation Training/organization & administration
15.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb ; 51(2): 168-172, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271024

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation via Instant Messaging - Birmingham Advance (SIMBA) aimed to improve clinicians' confidence in managing various clinical scenarios during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Five SIMBA sessions were conducted between May and August 2020. Each session included simulation of scenarios and interactive discussion. Participants' self-reported confidence, acceptance, and relevance of the simulated cases were measured. RESULTS: Significant improvement was observed in participants' self-reported confidence (overall n = 204, p<0.001; adrenal n = 33, p<0.001; thyroid n = 37, p<0.001; pituitary n = 79, p<0.001; inflammatory bowel disease n = 17, p<0.001; acute medicine n = 38, p<0.001). Participants reported improvements in clinical competencies: patient care 52.0% (n = 106/204), professionalism 30.9% (n = 63/204), knowledge on patient management 84.8% (n = 173/204), systems-based practice 48.0% (n = 98/204), practice-based learning 69.6% (n = 142/204) and communication skills 25.5% (n = 52/204). CONCLUSION: SIMBA is a novel pedagogical virtual simulation-based learning model that improves clinicians' confidence in managing conditions across various specialties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Simulation Training/methods , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
World Neurosurg ; 151: 182-189, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240646

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Metric-based surgical training can be used to quantify the level and progression of neurosurgical performance to optimize and monitor training progress. Here we applied innovative metrics to a physical neurosurgery trainer to explore whether these metrics differentiate between different levels of experience across different tasks. METHODS: Twenty-four participants (9 experts, 15 novices) performed 4 tasks (dissection, spatial adaptation, depth adaptation, and the A-B-A task) using the PsT1 training system. Four performance metrics (collision, precision, dissected area, and time) and 6 kinematic metrics (dispersion, path length, depth perception, velocity, acceleration, and motion smoothness) were collected. RESULTS: For all tasks, the execution time (t) of the experts was significantly lower than that of novices (P < 0.05). The experts performed significantly better in all but 2 of the other metrics, dispersion and sectional area, corresponding to the A-B-A task and dissection task, respectively, for which they showed a nonsignificant trend towards better performance (P = 0.052 and P = 0.076, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to differentiate between the skill levels of novices and experts according to parameters derived from the PsT1 platform, paving the way for the quantitative assessment of training progress using this system. During the current coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, neurosurgical simulators that gather surgical performance metrics offer a solution to the educational needs of residents.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Neuroendoscopy/education , Neuroendoscopy/methods , Psychomotor Performance/physiology , Simulation Training/methods , Clinical Competence/standards , Humans , Neuroendoscopy/standards , Simulation Training/standards
17.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(6): 486-491, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation training has become a key part of the surgical curriculum over recent years. Current trainees face significantly reduced operating time as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, alongside increased costs to surgical training, thus creating a need for low-cost simulation models. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using multiple databases. Each model included was assessed for the ease and expense of its construction, as well as its validity and educational value. RESULTS: A total of 18 low-cost simulation models were identified, relating to otology, head and neck surgery, laryngeal surgery, rhinology, and tonsil surgery. In only four of these models (22.2 per cent) was an attempt made to demonstrate the educational impact of the model. Validation was rarely formally assessed. CONCLUSION: More efforts are required to standardise validation methods and demonstrate the educational value of the available low-cost simulation models in otorhinolaryngology.


Subject(s)
Computer Simulation/economics , Otolaryngology/education , Simulation Training/economics , Surgeons/education , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Competence/economics , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Computer Simulation/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Databases, Factual , Humans , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Simulation Training/methods , United Kingdom/epidemiology
18.
Fam Med ; 53(4): 282-284, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197755

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: On March 17, 2020, the Association of American Medical Colleges recommended temporary suspension of all medical student clinical activities due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which required a rapid development of alternatives to traditional teaching methods. This study examines education changes spurred by COVID-19. METHODS: Data were collected via a Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance survey of family medicine clerkship directors. Participants answered questions about didactic and clinical changes made to clerkship teaching due to the COVID-19 pandemic, how positive the changes were, whether the changes would be made permanent, and how prepared clerkship directors were for the changes. RESULTS: The response rate was 64%. The most frequent change made to didactic teaching was increasing online resources. The most frequent change made to clinical teaching was adding clinical simulation. Greater changes were made to clinical teaching than to didactic teaching. Changes made to didactic teaching were perceived as more positive for student learning than the changes made to clinical teaching. Clerkship directors felt more prepared for changes to didactic teaching than for clinical teaching, and were more likely to make the didactic teaching changes permanent than the clinical teaching changes. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic caused nearly all clerkship directors to make changes to clerkship teaching, but few felt prepared to make these changes, particularly changes to clinical teaching. Clerkship directors made fewer changes to didactic teaching than clinical teaching, however, didactic changes were perceived as more positive than clinical changes and were more likely to be adopted long term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Family Practice/education , Simulation Training/methods , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
19.
Acad Med ; 96(10): 1414-1418, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185988

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: The most effective way to train clinicians to safely don and doff personal protective equipment (PPE) and perform aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs), such as intubations, is unknown when clinician educators are unavailable, as they have been during the COVID-19 pandemic. Proper PPE and airway management techniques are critical to prevent the transmission of respiratory illnesses such as COVID-19. APPROACH: In March 2020, the authors implemented a structured train-the-trainers curriculum to teach PPE techniques and a modified airway management algorithm for suspected COVID-19 patients. A single emergency medicine physician trainer taught 17 subsequent emergency medicine and critical care physician trainers the proper PPE and airway management techniques. The initial trainer and 7 of the subsequent trainers then instructed 99 other emergency medicine resident and attending physicians using in situ simulation. Trainers and learners completed retrospective pre-post surveys to assess their comfort teaching the material and performing the techniques, respectively. OUTCOMES: The surveys demonstrated a significant increase in the trainers' comfort in teaching simulation-based education, from 4.00 to 4.53 on a 5-point Likert scale (P < .005), and in teaching the airway management techniques through simulation, from 2.47 to 4.47 (P < .001). There was no difference in the change in comfort level between those learners who were taught by the initial trainer and those who were taught by the subsequent trainers. These results suggest that the subsequent trainers were as effective in teaching the simulation material as the initial trainer. NEXT STEPS: Work is ongoing to investigate clinician- and patient-specific outcomes, including PPE adherence, appropriate AGP performance, complication rate, and learners' skill retention. Future work will focus on implementing similar train-the-trainers strategies for other health professions, specialties, and high-risk or rare procedures.


Subject(s)
Airway Management/methods , COVID-19/therapy , Computer Simulation , Curriculum , Health Personnel/education , Personal Protective Equipment , Simulation Training/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(8): 1267-1270, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155438

ABSTRACT

Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is associated with poor survival. Simulation is frequently used to evaluate and train code teams with the goal of improving outcomes. All participants engaged in training on donning and doffing of personal protective equipment for suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases. Thereafter, simulations of in-hospital cardiac arrest of patients with COVID-19, so-called protected code blue, were conducted at a quaternary academic centre. The primary endpoint was the mean time-to-defibrillation. A total of 114 patients participated in 33 "protected code blue" simulations over 8 weeks: 10 were senior residents, 17 were attending physicians, 86 were nurses, and 5 were respiratory therapists. Mean time-to-defibrillation was 4.38 minutes. Mean time-to-room entry, time-to-intubation, time-to-first-chest compression and time-to-epinephrine were 2.77, 5.74, 6.31, and 6.20 minutes, respectively; 92.84% of the 16 criteria evaluating the proper management of patients with COVID-19 and cardiac arrest were met. Mean time-to-defibrillation was longer than guidelines-expected time during protected code blue simulations. Although adherence to the modified advanced cardiovascular life-support protocol was high, breaches that carry additional infectious risk and reduce the efficacy of the resuscitation team were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Education, Medical , Heart Arrest , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Simulation Training/methods , Time-to-Treatment/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Canada/epidemiology , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/methods , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/standards , Clinical Protocols , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/trends , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Heart Arrest/etiology , Heart Arrest/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
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