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1.
PLoS One ; 17(6): e0269922, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1887032

ABSTRACT

Following the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, individuals have begun to take preventive measures to avoid exposure. Among the precautionary measures, facemask was mostly emphasized. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of dermatological symptoms linked with face mask usage and explore other associated factors. This cross-sectional survey was conducted throughout all eight divisions of Bangladesh. 1297 people were approached using a fixed-step procedure on a random route sample where 803 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The overall prevalence of dermatological manifestation in this study was 40.85%. The common dermatological manifestations due to facemasks use were acne (26%), allergy symptoms (24%), traumatic symptoms (24%), and other symptoms (26%). Two important frequently reported risk factors were previous history of skin diseases and obesity. Females were more likely to have acne (CI: 1.199, 3.098; p = .007) and allergy issues (CI: 1.042, 2.359; p = .031). N95 and KN95 masks were more likely to produce allergic symptoms, while surgical mask users were more likely to develop acne. Acne was prevalent more than twice (CI: 1.42, 4.26; p = 0.001) in persons with a COVID-19 infection history. Further exploration is required to find out the reason. Surgical mask users reported more complaints than other types of masks, and prolonged use caused more skin symptoms. Modifications in the pattern of facemask usage and planning for work recesses might also be advised to provide for a pause from uninterrupted facemask use.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris , COVID-19 , Hypersensitivity , Skin Diseases , Acne Vulgaris/epidemiology , Acne Vulgaris/etiology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Hypersensitivity/epidemiology , Masks/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Skin Diseases/etiology
2.
Ital J Pediatr ; 48(1): 93, 2022 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1886955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID toes or chilblain-like skin lesions have been widely reported during COVID-19 pandemic. Most cases were described in patients with negative microbiological tests for SARS-CoV-2, therefore the possible relationship with SARS-CoV-2 infection, as well as with the nowadays broadly available mRNA-based vaccination, has not been fully elucidated.  CASE PRESENTATION: We here describe the case of a 14-year-old male who developed chilblain-like skin eruptions during SARS-CoV-2 infection despite two mRNA-based vaccine doses and review the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of chilblain-like lesions as a cutaneous presentation of COVID-19 in children. CONCLUSIONS: Most children and adolescent with COVID toes have a mild or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our report aims to highlight the possible onset of these skin lesions in vaccinated children, if infection has occurred, and the potential use of systemic corticosteroids as a first line treatment. Additional evidence is required to better understand SARS-CoV-2 infection and cutaneous manifestations in children and determine the relationship between chilblain-like lesions and COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chilblains , Skin Diseases , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Chilblains/diagnosis , Chilblains/etiology , Child , Humans , Male , Pandemics , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/complications
3.
Cutis ; 109(4): 211-217, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879659

ABSTRACT

The direct-to-consumer (DTC) telemedicine industry, including teledermatology, has seen rapid expansion in recent years, partly because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The shortage of dermatologists and the visual nature of dermatologic conditions attracted DTC companies to dermatology. As more patients continue to seek medical consultations and prescription medications from these for-profit companies, we must approach their growth with healthy skepticism. Shortcomings of DTC teledermatology include concerns about conflicts of interest (COIs), overdiagnosis, and overprescribing. Although DTC teledermatology is certainly here to stay, an appropriate understanding of this industry will allow dermatologists to advise patients and advocate for best practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Skin Diseases , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/therapy
4.
AACN Adv Crit Care ; 33(2): 186-195, 2022 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879536

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause virus-mediated endothelial dysfunction, which in turn may lead to coagulopathy and ischemic microangiopathy. In the critical care population, cutaneous skin manifestations related to vascular compromise due to COVID-19 include livedo and purpura. These lesions can be difficult to differentiate from other dermatologic conditions seen in this population, including skin failure and deep-tissue pressure injuries. In addition, similarities in underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of these skin conditions can cause diagnostic overlap. Skin failure is known to occur in critical care patients owing to disease severity and shunting of blood to vital organs. COVID-19-related ischemic lesions can mimic the clinical course of deep-tissue pressure injury. The viral endothelial dysfunction present in patients with COVID-19 decreases tissue tolerance, which can result in an increased risk of hospital-acquired pressure injury. Extrinsic factors can also complicate diagnosis of cutaneous lesions in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Skin Diseases , Critical Care , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin/pathology , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/pathology
5.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 290: 465-468, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879410

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the patient experience with teledermatology among new versus existing clinic patients in the context of the rapid practice shift to teledermatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed survey responses from 184 teledermatology patients seen during COVID-19 at a major Southeastern medical center from May 13th to June 5th 2020. Overall patient-reported satisfaction with teledermatology was high with the majority of respondents rating their overall satisfaction as excellent (68%) or very good (18%). As teledermatology experiences wider adoption with the COVID-19 pandemic, it is essential to examine patient experience and satisfaction with teledermatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Skin Diseases , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/therapy
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841370

ABSTRACT

The documentation of ethnopharmaceutical knowledge has always been important for the preservation of countries' cultural, social, and economic identity. The COVID-19 pandemic with the collapse of healthcare, which has left the individual health to self-care, has also forced us to look back at ethnopharmacology from a practical point of view. This is the first study in Lithuania, dedicated entirely to ethnopharmaceuticals used for skin diseases and cosmetics, and the first study to analyse ethnopharmacology as a Lithuanian phenomenon during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The main purpose of this study was to collect and evaluate ethnopharmaceutical knowledge regarding skin diseases and cosmetics in Siauliai District, Lithuania during the COVID-19 pandemic from July 2020 to October 2021. This study surveyed 50 respondents; the survey was conducted using the deep interview method. The respondents mentioned 67 species of medicinal plants from 37 different families used for skin diseases (64.18%), cosmetics (13.44%) and cosmeceuticals (22.38%). Of the 67 plant species, 43 (64%) were not included in the European Medicines Agency monographs and only 14 species (21%) of all included species were used with European Medicines Agency approved medical indications for skin diseases. In terms of public health, the safety of "self-treatment" and recovery rituals for skin diseases are no less important than ethnopharmacological knowledge and its application, this being especially relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cosmetics , Skin Diseases , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cosmetics/therapeutic use , Ethnopharmacology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Lithuania/epidemiology , Pandemics , Phytotherapy , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
9.
Rev Chilena Infectol ; 38(6): 745-753, 2021 12.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 disease, besides presenting respiratory manifestations, can affect other organs such as kidneys, gastrointestinal system, heart, and skin. So far, five clinical variants of dermatoses have been described. Few reports discuss the severity associated with the cutaneous manifestations of COVID-19 and the prognosis. AIM: To describe the clinical and histopathological patterns of dermatoses in patients with COVID-19 infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Prospective cohort study conducted in patients admitted to "IMSS T1" in Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico from September 2020 to January 2021. We identified those with COVID-19 dermatosis from the moment they were admitted; and those who developed them during hospitalization. Patients were invited to participate for a clinical evaluation and biopsy. The biopsies were described by an expert pathologist. RESULTS: The frequency of dermatological lesions was 15.7%. Those who developed dermatosis during their hospital stay presented higher mortality (p = 0.001) and severity of COVID-19 (p = 0.001) Vasoocclusive lesions were the most frequent in the hospital setting, and were associated to higher mortality (p = 0.003). The most frequent histopathological feature was superficial and deep thrombosis (58%). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who developed dermatologic lesions during hospitalization and those with vaso-occlusive dermatoses had higher morbi-mortality. Vaso-occlusive lesions could be considered as a poor prognostic factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Skin Diseases , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Prospective Studies
10.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 119(8): 131, 2022 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834317
11.
Hautarzt ; 73(6): 434-441, 2022 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813630

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a systemic disease induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that frequently presents with skin manifestations. The five most common skin lesions are pseudo-chilblain and maculopapular, urticarial, vesicular, and livedo/necrotizing skin lesions. These skin lesions are of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. For example, in children, typical skin lesions may indicate a life-threatening inflammatory syndrome, which rarely occurs after corona infection. Skin lesions have also been described after COVID-19 vaccination. These usually show an uncomplicated, self-limiting course and therefore do not represent a contraindication for completing the vaccination status in the vast majority of cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Skin Diseases , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/etiology , Skin Diseases/pathology , Vaccination/adverse effects
12.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 30: e3551, 2022.
Article in Portuguese, English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799031

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to identify the diverse scientific evidence on the types of skin lesions caused due to the use of Personal Protective Equipment in health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic and to verify the recommended prevention measures. METHOD: this is an integrative review carried out in the MEDLINE, CINAHL, LILACS, SCOPUS, Science Direct, Web of Science and SciELO databases. The search was conducted in a paired manner, constituting a sample of 17 studies categorized according to the types of skin lesions and preventive measures. RESULTS: the main types of skin lesions related to mask use were stage 1 pressure ulcers, acne and cutaneous depression. Regarding the use of glasses and face shields, the most frequent were stage 1 and 2 pressure ulcers. Xerosis and irritant contact dermatitis occurred due to using gloves and protective clothing, respectively. The main preventive measures recommended were using hydrocolloid or foam dressing in the pressure regions, moisturizers and emollients. CONCLUSION: a considerable number of skin lesions associated with using the equipment were noticed, and the data obtained can guide the professionals in identifying risks and promoting preventive measures to avoid their occurrence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Skin Diseases , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control
13.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(6): 934-965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1797058

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiologic agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is a single-stranded RNA virus whose sequence is known. COVID-19 is associated with a heterogeneous clinical phenotype ranging from asymptomatic to fatal disease. It appears that access to nasopharyngeal respiratory epithelia expressing angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2, the receptor for SARS-CoV-2, is followed by viral replication in the pulmonary alveolar septal capillary bed. We have demonstrated in earlier studies that incomplete viral particles, termed pseudovirions, dock to deep subcutaneous and other vascular beds, potentially contributing to the prothrombotic state and systemic complement activation that characterizes severe and critical COVID-19. A variety of skin eruptions have been described in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection and more recently, after COVID-19 vaccination. The vaccines deliver a laboratory-synthesized mRNA that encodes a protein that is identical to the spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2, allowing the production of immunogenic spike glycoprotein that will then elicit T cell and B cell adaptive immune responses. In this contribution, we review an array of cutaneous manifestations of COVID-19 that provide an opportunity to study critical pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie all clinical facets of COVID-19, ranging from asymptomatic/mild to severe and critical COVID-19. We classify cutaneous COVID-19 according to underlying pathophysiologic principles. In this regard we propose three main pathways: (1) complement mediated thrombotic vascular injury syndromes deploying the alternative and mannan binding lectin pathways and resulting in the elaboration of cytokines like interleukin 6 from endothelium in the setting of severe and critical COVID-19 and (2) the robust T cell and type I interferon-driven inflammatory and (3) humoral-driven immune complex mediated vasculitic cutaneous reactions observed with mild and moderate COVID-19. Presented are novel data on cutaneous vaccine reactions that manifest a clinical and morphologic parallel with similar eruptions observed in patients with mild and moderate COVID-19 and in some cases represent systemic eczematoid hypersensitivity reactions to a putative vaccine-based antigen versus unmasking subclinical hypersensitivity due to immune enhancing effects of the vaccine. Finally, we demonstrate for the first time the localization of human synthesized spike glycoprotein after the COVID-19 vaccine to the cutaneous and subcutaneous vasculature confirming the ability of SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein to bind endothelium in the absence of intact virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Skin Diseases/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cytokines , Humans , Skin Diseases/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
15.
Skinmed ; 20(1): 29-32, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1790217

ABSTRACT

Lockdown was enforced in many countries across the globe to flatten the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) curve. In these difficult times, people with skin diseases faced unique challenge, as major clinical facilities came to a standstill. Teledermatology helped to an extent to bridge this provider-seeker gap to an extent. We compiled data of patients seeking dermatology services during this period in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal. Most of the patients were middle-aged (70%) and had good access to teledermatology. Dermatoses were primarily due to frequent handwashing, use of alcohol-based sanitizers, excessive use of water (12.6%), improper skin care (43.3%), sun exposure (20.5%), lockdown-induced stress (22.04%), infections (15.75%), flare of preexisting diseases (8.66%), and hair disorders (11%). Many dermatoses had a causal overlap. Teledermatology proved to be useful for patients with skin diseases who were unable to access direct face-to-face consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Skin Diseases , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Middle Aged , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
16.
Dermatol Online J ; 27(12)2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789590

ABSTRACT

Two weeks after her first dose of the SARS-CoV-2 mRNA-1273 (Moderna) vaccine, a 38-year-old woman developed acute-onset pain and ulceration within a tattoo on the distal left leg. Progressive ulceration was noted approximately one week following her second dose of the vaccine. A biopsy revealed sarcoidal granulomas and a dense neutrophilic infiltrate. Ultimately, the final diagnosis of what we have termed a "sarcoidal reaction with a Sweet-like phenomenon" was made; the patient experienced a reduction in pain and re-epithelialization of the ulcers with two weeks of the use of topical clobetasol 0.05% cream twice daily.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sarcoidosis , Skin Diseases , Tattooing , Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Pain , SARS-CoV-2 , Ulcer , Vaccination
17.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 81(5): 601-613, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784782

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Autoinflammatory type I interferonopathies, chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature/proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (CANDLE/PRAAS), stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI) and Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) are rare and clinically complex immunodysregulatory diseases. With emerging knowledge of genetic causes and targeted treatments, a Task Force was charged with the development of 'points to consider' to improve diagnosis, treatment and long-term monitoring of patients with these rare diseases. METHODS: Members of a Task Force consisting of rheumatologists, neurologists, an immunologist, geneticists, patient advocates and an allied healthcare professional formulated research questions for a systematic literature review. Then, based on literature, Delphi questionnaires and consensus methodology, 'points to consider' to guide patient management were developed. RESULTS: The Task Force devised consensus and evidence-based guidance of 4 overarching principles and 17 points to consider regarding the diagnosis, treatment and long-term monitoring of patients with the autoinflammatory interferonopathies, CANDLE/PRAAS, SAVI and AGS. CONCLUSION: These points to consider represent state-of-the-art knowledge to guide diagnostic evaluation, treatment and management of patients with CANDLE/PRAAS, SAVI and AGS and aim to standardise and improve care, quality of life and disease outcomes.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System , Nervous System Malformations , Rheumatology , Skin Diseases , Erythema Nodosum , Fingers/abnormalities , Humans , Quality of Life
18.
J Invest Dermatol ; 142(4): 989-990, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768316

Subject(s)
Skin Diseases , Humans
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