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2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841370

ABSTRACT

The documentation of ethnopharmaceutical knowledge has always been important for the preservation of countries' cultural, social, and economic identity. The COVID-19 pandemic with the collapse of healthcare, which has left the individual health to self-care, has also forced us to look back at ethnopharmacology from a practical point of view. This is the first study in Lithuania, dedicated entirely to ethnopharmaceuticals used for skin diseases and cosmetics, and the first study to analyse ethnopharmacology as a Lithuanian phenomenon during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The main purpose of this study was to collect and evaluate ethnopharmaceutical knowledge regarding skin diseases and cosmetics in Siauliai District, Lithuania during the COVID-19 pandemic from July 2020 to October 2021. This study surveyed 50 respondents; the survey was conducted using the deep interview method. The respondents mentioned 67 species of medicinal plants from 37 different families used for skin diseases (64.18%), cosmetics (13.44%) and cosmeceuticals (22.38%). Of the 67 plant species, 43 (64%) were not included in the European Medicines Agency monographs and only 14 species (21%) of all included species were used with European Medicines Agency approved medical indications for skin diseases. In terms of public health, the safety of "self-treatment" and recovery rituals for skin diseases are no less important than ethnopharmacological knowledge and its application, this being especially relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cosmetics , Skin Diseases , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cosmetics/therapeutic use , Ethnopharmacology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Lithuania/epidemiology , Pandemics , Phytotherapy , Skin Diseases/drug therapy , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
3.
Skinmed ; 20(1): 29-32, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1790217

ABSTRACT

Lockdown was enforced in many countries across the globe to flatten the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) curve. In these difficult times, people with skin diseases faced unique challenge, as major clinical facilities came to a standstill. Teledermatology helped to an extent to bridge this provider-seeker gap to an extent. We compiled data of patients seeking dermatology services during this period in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal. Most of the patients were middle-aged (70%) and had good access to teledermatology. Dermatoses were primarily due to frequent handwashing, use of alcohol-based sanitizers, excessive use of water (12.6%), improper skin care (43.3%), sun exposure (20.5%), lockdown-induced stress (22.04%), infections (15.75%), flare of preexisting diseases (8.66%), and hair disorders (11%). Many dermatoses had a causal overlap. Teledermatology proved to be useful for patients with skin diseases who were unable to access direct face-to-face consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Skin Diseases , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Middle Aged , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
4.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 88(2): 148-149, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744421
5.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(5): 1804-1808, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714235

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID pandemic has affected the human race both physically and mentally. Mask use remains the standard way of preventing the spread of this virus. The continuous mask use has led to the emergence of various dermatoses like acne, pigmentation, and seborrhea in mask contact areas. The present survey has been undertaken to describe the various dermatoses encountered in the medical fraternity especially doctors, who are frequently exposed to prolonged mask use. AIMS: To estimate the frequency of various cutaneous manifestations seen among doctors following mask use via web-based online questionnaire survey. METHODS: It was a cross-sectional web-based study conducted at a tertiary care teaching institute from June 2021 to August 2021. All the doctors of the hospital completing the questionnaire were included in the study with informed consent. RESULTS: A total of 178 participants completed the survey. The most common complaint was increased sweating (55.6%) followed by acne (34.3%) and oily skin (34.3%). Significant association was found between skin changes and duration (>6 h/day) of mask use, increasing number, and type of mask (N 95) used (p value <0.05). CONCLUSION: The knowledge of various mask-induced/aggravated dermatoses will help formulate proper precautionary protocols enhancing efficient mask usage for prolonged periods.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris , COVID-19 , Physicians , Skin Diseases , Acne Vulgaris/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Internet , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Skin Diseases/etiology , Tertiary Healthcare
9.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 587-597, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343177

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dermatology practice cannot be overstated. At its peak, the pandemic resulted in the temporary closure of ambulatory sites as resources were reallocated towards pandemic response efforts. Many outpatient clinics have since reopened and are beginning to experience a semblance of pre-pandemic routine, albeit with restrictions in place. We provide an overview of how COVID-19 has affected dermatology practice globally beginning with the rise of teledermatology. A summary of expert recommendations that shape the "new normal" in various domains of dermatology practice, namely, dermatology consultation, procedural dermatology, and phototherapy, is also provided.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities/trends , Dermatology/standards , Primary Health Care/trends , Skin Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Office Visits/trends , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
15.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(8)2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335147

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has a considerable influence on public health, either directly or indirectly. We investigated outpatient skin disease diagnoses at the dermatology clinic to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on these patients. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using the International Codes of Diseases data from the outpatient department of Dermatology clinic, Vajira hospital, Navamindradhiraj University, Bangkok, Thailand from January 2019 to June 2021. Results: A total of 20,915 patients with 34,116 skin diagnoses were included in the study. The average weekly dermatologic clinic visits remained unchanged between the years with and without COVID-19 pandemic. While the percentage of xerosis cutis, other skin infections (syphilis and parasitic infections), hair and nail disorders, pigmentary disorders, benign skin tumors and drug eruptions were significantly decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic years, the percentage of other dermatitis, fungal and viral skin infections, acne, psoriasis, urticaria, vesiculobullous and autoimmune diseases were increased. Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic had a minimal effect on the average weekly skin clinic visits, but the diagnosed skin diseases pattern was affected. Knowing the pattern of skin diseases may help aid hospitals to better prepare for future pandemics in securing appropriate medications and supplies and training the medical teams.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Skin Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Thailand
16.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 12-22, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300687

ABSTRACT

A wide range of cutaneous signs are attributed to COVID-19 infection. This retrospective study assesses the presence and impact of dermatologic manifestations related to the spread of COVID-19 in Lombardy, the geographic district with the first outbreak in Italy. A cohort of 345 patients with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 was collected from February 1, 2020 to May 31, 2020. Cutaneous signs and dermatologic diagnoses were recorded on admission, and during the course of the disease. Of the 345 patients included in the study, 52 (15%) had new-onset dermatologic conditions related to COVID-19. We observed seven major cutaneous clinical patterns, merged under 3 main groups: Exanthems, vascular lesions, and other cutaneous manifestations. Each subset was detailed with prevalence, age, duration, prognosis, and histology. Cutaneous findings can lead to suspect COVID-19 infection and identify potentially contagious cases with indolent course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Skin Diseases/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Chilblains/pathology , Chilblains/virology , Child , Erythema Multiforme/virology , Exanthema/virology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/pathology , Skin Diseases, Vascular/virology , Urticaria/virology , Young Adult
19.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 575-585, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252654

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, rapid, real-world evidence is essential for the development of knowledge and subsequent public health response. In dermatology, provider-facing and patient-facing registries focused on COVID-19 have been important sources of research and new information aimed at guiding optimal patient care. The 7 dermatology registries included in this update now include more than 8000 case reports sourced from physicians and patients from countries all over the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Prevalence , Risk Factors
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10362, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228276

ABSTRACT

Trypophobia is induced by viewing multiple clustered objects. To date, several studies have investigated why certain people experience discomfort when looking at clustered patterns. Recently, "involuntary protection against dermatosis" (IPAD) hypothesis was proposed to explain the causes of trypophobia. The IPAD hypothesis suggests that involuntary aversive responses to skin diseases cause discomfort in response to image clusters. However, this idea has not been fully investigated empirically. Therefore, the present study used a modified version of the priming procedure and tested whether the activation of the concept of skin-related diseases affected the evaluation of trypophobic images. In Experiment 1, participants engaged in a lexical decision task in which words related to skin problems, negative events, or neutral events were presented. Then, they evaluated the discomfort of trypophobic, negative, and neutral images. The results indicated that participants evaluated trypophobic images as more discomforting after they were exposed to skin-problem-related words, whereas the exposure to words related to skin-problems did not enhance the discomfort of negative images. These findings demonstrate that the association with skin-related problems increases the discomfort of trypophobic images. In Experiment 2, we further tested the reproducibility of the priming effect observed in Experiment 1 and investigated the effect of priming with words related to COVID-19 in the context of a spreading infection. Contrary to predictions, no priming effect was produced by either skin-related words or COVID-19-related words. Future studies should further explore the causal relationship of the association between skin disease and trypophobia.


Subject(s)
Pattern Recognition, Visual , Phobic Disorders/etiology , Skin Diseases , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Skin Diseases/epidemiology
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