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1.
Int J Cancer ; 150(5): 816-824, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449925

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic had a severe impact on medical care. Our study aims to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on advanced melanoma care in the Netherlands. We selected patients diagnosed with irresectable stage IIIc and IV melanoma during the first and second COVID-19 wave and compared them with patients diagnosed within the same time frame in 2018 and 2019. Patients were divided into three geographical regions. We investigated baseline characteristics, time from diagnosis until start of systemic therapy and postponement of anti-PD-1 courses. During both waves, fewer patients were diagnosed compared to the control groups. During the first wave, time between diagnosis and start of treatment was significantly longer in the southern region compared to other regions (33 vs 9 and 15 days, P-value <.05). Anti-PD-1 courses were postponed in 20.0% vs 3.0% of patients in the first wave compared to the control period. Significantly more patients had courses postponed in the south during the first wave compared to other regions (34.8% vs 11.5% vs 22.3%, P-value <.001). Significantly more patients diagnosed during the second wave had brain metastases and worse performance status compared to the control period. In conclusion, advanced melanoma care in the Netherlands was severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In the south, the start of systemic treatment for advanced melanoma was more often delayed, and treatment courses were more frequently postponed. During the second wave, patients were diagnosed with poorer patient and tumor characteristics. Longer follow-up is needed to establish the impact on patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Melanoma/complications , Skin Neoplasms/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Cancer Res Clin Oncol ; 147(6): 1757-1761, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287438

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) over 3 weeks has proved to be a safe and effective treatment for cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). In this prospective trial, we examined the feasibility of ultra-hypofractionated low-dose TSEBT regimen in two fractions with 4 Gy combined with systemic therapy to minimize the number of visits to radiation centers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Six patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) or Sézary syndrome (SS) received TSEBT with a total radiation dose of 8 Gy in two fractions between April 2020 and June 2020. Patient and treatment characteristics, tumor burden, the impact on the quality of life using Skindex-29 questionnaires, and acute toxicities were analyzed. RESULTS: During TSEBT, all patients developed grade 1 toxicities while two patients developed grade 2 toxicities. One patient experienced sepsis. The most common adverse effects were erythema and edema. All grade 2 toxicities regressed after 4 weeks following TSEBT. Based on the reported symptoms measured by Skindex-29, we detected a significant reduction in total Skindex-29 score after 8 weeks of radiation (P = 0.03), particularly in the symptoms (P = 0.01) and emotional domains (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Ultra-hypofractionated low-dose TSEBT followed by systemic therapy seems to be a safe and feasible alternative to conventional fractionated TSEBT for patients with MF/SS. The skin tumor burden and the health-related quality of life have been significantly improved within 8 weeks following radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous/radiotherapy , Radiotherapy, Conformal/methods , Skin Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Aged , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Cutaneous/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Mycosis Fungoides/complications , Mycosis Fungoides/radiotherapy , Quality of Life , Radiation Injuries/diagnosis , Radiation Injuries/etiology , Radiotherapy Dosage , Radiotherapy, Conformal/adverse effects , Sezary Syndrome/complications , Sezary Syndrome/radiotherapy , Skin Neoplasms/complications , Treatment Outcome
5.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(4): 425-442, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188209

ABSTRACT

The emergence of data from clinical trials of biologics, the approval of new biologics, and our improved understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis have increased the therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Biologics currently approved for the treatment of psoriasis include tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, interleukin (IL)-17 inhibitors, ustekinumab (an IL-12/23 inhibitor), and IL-23 inhibitors. Data from clinical trials and studies of the safety and efficacy of biologics provide essential information for the personalization of patient care. We discuss the benefits and disadvantages of biologics as a first-line treatment choice, update treatment recommendations according to current evidence, and propose psoriasis treatment algorithms. Our discussion includes the following comorbid conditions: psoriatic arthritis, multiple sclerosis, congestive heart failure, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatitis B, nonmelanoma skin cancer, lymphoma, and latent tuberculosis. We make evidence-based treatment recommendations for special populations, including pediatric patients, patients with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), and pregnant and breastfeeding patients with psoriasis. Ultimately, individualized recommendations that consider patient preferences, disease severity, comorbid conditions, and additional risk factors should be offered to patients and updated as new trial data emerges.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Heart Failure/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/complications , Latent Tuberculosis/complications , Lymphoma/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Skin Neoplasms/complications
8.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(7)2020 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-825068

ABSTRACT

Despite the increasing incidence of metastatic melanoma in the older population, there are relatively limited data for those older than 75 years of age. Elderly patients are often under-represented in clinical trials. In addition, elderly patients in trials often have a lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score and fewer comorbidities and may thus not truly reflect the realities of day-to-day clinical practice. We present a case of a 95-year-old woman who had extensive and unresectable subcutaneous and dermal deposits of metastatic melanoma of her right leg, which caused oedema and reduced mobility. She was treated concurrently with pembrolizumab and radiotherapy to her leg lesions of melanoma. She has had an excellent response to treatment, with complete resolution of the subcutaneous and dermal metastatic deposits and has not developed any immune-related toxicities. Our experience demonstrates that anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 therapy can be given safely and effectively even in very elderly metastatic melanoma patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy/methods , Melanoma/complications , Neoplasm Metastasis/drug therapy , Skin Neoplasms/complications , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Treatment Outcome
9.
Immunotherapy ; 12(15): 1133-1138, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750791

ABSTRACT

Background: Little is known about the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) course and outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy. Here we describe a metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma patient with a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection while receiving pembrolizumab. Case presentation: A 66-year-old man, with a metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma receiving pembrolizumab, presented with fever. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed pulmonary ground-glass opacities, suggesting viral or immuno-related etiology. On day 7, the patient was hospitalized due to dyspnea and worsening of the radiological findings. Real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing confirmed COVID-19. The patient developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury. Hydroxychloroquine was administered for 5 days, but discontinued after supraventricular extrasystoles. Clinical improvement allowed the patient's discharge after 81 days of hospitalization. Conclusion: A careful evaluation of oncologic patients receiving immunotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic is of utmost importance.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Merkel Cell/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Immunotherapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Skin Neoplasms/therapy , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Merkel Cell/complications , Carcinoma, Merkel Cell/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Neoplasms/complications , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
16.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(5): e13430, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-100063

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a new coronavirus responsible for the pandemic named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The disease causes SARS with a significant morbidity and mortality. We provide a review with a focus on COVID-19 in dermatology. We discuss triage of suspected infectious patients, protection of medical doctors and nurses. We discuss the available data on cutaneous symptoms, although disease-specific symptoms have yet not been observed. COVID-19 is a challenge for the treatment of dermatologic patients, either with severe inflammatory disorders or with skin cancer. The consequences for systemic treatment are obvious but it will be most important to collect the clinical data for a better decision process. Last but not least, education in dermatology for students will not be temporarily possible in the classical settings. COVID-19, although not a skin disease, by itself has an immense impact on dermatology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dermatitis, Occupational/etiology , Humans , Interleukin-17/physiology , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Skin Neoplasms/complications
17.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 83(2): 703-704, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-92098
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