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1.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264921, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753191

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify preferred burnout interventions within a resident physician population, utilizing the Nominal Group Technique. The results will be used to design a discrete choice experiment study to inform the development of resident burnout prevention programs. METHODS: Three resident focus groups met (10-14 participants/group) to prioritize a list of 23 factors for burnout prevention programs. The Nominal Group Technique consisted of three steps: an individual, confidential ranking of the 23 factors by importance from 1 to 23, a group discussion of each attribute, including a group review of the rankings, and an opportunity to alter the original ranking across participants. RESULTS: The total number of residents (36) were a representative sample of specialty, year of residency, and sex. There was strong agreement about the most highly rated attributes which grouped naturally into themes of autonomy, meaning, competency and relatedness. There was also disagreement on several of the attributes that is likely due to the differences in residency specialty and subsequently rotation requirements. CONCLUSION: This study identified the need to address multiple organizational factors that may lead to physician burnout. There is a clear need for complex interventions that target systemic and program level factors rather than focus on individual interventions. These results may help residency program directors understand the specific attributes of a burnout prevention program valued by residents. Aligning burnout interventions with resident preferences could improve the efficacy of burnout prevention programs by improving adoption of, and satisfaction with, these programs. Physician burnout is a work-related syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment [1]. Burnout is present in epidemic proportions and was estimated to occur in over 50 percent of practicing physicians and in up to 89 percent of resident physicians pre-COVID 19. The burnout epidemic is growing; a recent national survey of US physicians reported an 8.9 percent increase in burnout between 2011 and 2014 [2]. Rates of physician burnout have also increased [3] during the COVID-19 pandemic with a new classification of "pandemic burnout" experienced by over 52 percent of healthcare workers as early as June of 2020 [4]. Physician burnout can lead to depression, suicidal ideation, and relationship problems that may progress to substance abuse, increased interpersonal conflicts, broken relationships, low quality of life, major depression, and suicide [5-7]. The estimated rate of physician suicide is 300-400 annually [8-10].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Physicians/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mindfulness , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Social Support
2.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 318, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278710

ABSTRACT

Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a sleep disorder characterized by the sudden urge to move the lower limbs during periods of rest accompanied by an unpleasant sensation like tingling or burning in the legs. Often, this urge is partially relieved by the movement of legs. However, it causes disturbance of sleep leading to daytime fatigue. Herein, we present an unusual case of new-onset of restless leg syndrome in a COVID-19 infected patient who presented three weeks after an uncomplicated delivery via caesarean section. The patient was managed with sleep hygiene measures, oral iron and vitamin C tablets apart from general COVID-19 management medications, subsequently leading to significant improvements. Here we have discussed possible associated factors, pathophysiological mechanisms and management of RLS in the case of COVID infected individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Restless Legs Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Cesarean Section , Female , Humans , Iron Compounds/administration & dosage , Pregnancy , Restless Legs Syndrome/virology , Sleep Hygiene
3.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(7)2021 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167701

ABSTRACT

High stress levels and sleep deprivation may cause several mental or physical health issues, such as depression, impaired memory, decreased motivation, obesity, etc. The COVID-19 pandemic has produced unprecedented changes in our lives, generating significant stress, and worries about health, social isolation, employment, and finances. To this end, nowadays more than ever, it is crucial to deliver solutions that can help people to manage and control their stress, as well as to reduce sleep disturbances, so as to improve their health and overall quality of life. Technology, and in particular Ambient Intelligence Environments, can help towards that direction, when considering that they are able to understand the needs of their users, identify their behavior, learn their preferences, and act and react in their interest. This work presents two systems that have been designed and developed in the context of an Intelligent Home, namely CaLmi and HypnOS, which aim to assist users that struggle with stress and poor sleep quality, respectively. Both of the systems rely on real-time data collected by wearable devices, as well as contextual information retrieved from the ambient facilities of the Intelligent Home, so as to offer appropriate pervasive relaxation programs (CaLmi) or provide personalized insights regarding sleep hygiene (HypnOS) to the residents. This article will describe the design process that was followed, the functionality of both systems, the results of the user studies that were conducted for the evaluation of their end-user applications, and a discussion about future plans.


Subject(s)
Sleep Hygiene , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Relaxation Therapy , Software , Wearable Electronic Devices
4.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 26(1): 33, 2021 Mar 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127684

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: School closure is one of the main policies of global health care strategies performed worldwide. Despite all benefits, there might be some threats for younger groups spending their time in quarantine. This study aims to determine the impacts of lockdown and school closure on children's major lifestyle aspects, especially their leisure and sleep pattern during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: For the purpose of this study, an online questionnaire was distributed from 14th to 31st of March 2020 among the schools and students from the first grade to the 12th grade (before university) in Fars province, southern Iran. The questionnaire consisted of five sections which included data regarding the students' general information, activity priorities, adherence to quarantine, attitude toward school closure, and sleep patterns. RESULTS: In our study, 20,697 filled questionnaires were received from the participants with an average age of 13.76 years; 29.7% of them were male, 80.6% were from urban areas, and 83.3% were from public schools. The overall first preference of students during school closure was mobile and computer games (30.1%), followed by studying (26.6%) and watching television (13.8%). Our results demonstrated that the majority of students adhered to social distancing and there was also a significant correlation among education levels and desire for schools to be closed till the end of the semester (P = 0.015). Also, regarding sleep patterns, the majority (53.5%) had above 12 h of sleep throughout the day. CONCLUSION: It seems that lockdown following COVID-19 pandemic has changed various aspects of the students' lifestyle remarkably, especially by increasing screen time and even sleep duration and pattern. We believe that certain strategies should be implemented by the Health and Educational Ministry to control not only the visible side effects of the quarantine period, but also the collateral consequences on their psychological and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Schools , Sleep Hygiene , Students/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Life Style , Male , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 37(4): 755-761, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076946

ABSTRACT

Respiratory complications from COVID-19 can lead to death. For this reason, public health measures to curb the spread of the disease such as quarantine and other confinement strategies have been proposed in several countries, resulting in mental health and sleep disorders. We carried out a narrative review to systematize the most significant findings regarding insomnia in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, and in healthy persons who have been under confinement as a preventive measure. COVID-19-related conditions have caused insomnia in patients, which can alter the immune system and have a negative effect on health. For healthy people in quarantine, lifestyle changes, fear of becoming infected, young age, female gender, history of mental illness and reduced ability to cope with stress appear to be risk factors for insomnia. As well as the implementation of epidemiological and preventive measures, sleep hygiene should be promoted as a comprehensive coping strategy against the COVID-19 pandemic.


Las complicaciones respiratorias por la COVID-19 pueden llevar a la muerte, por lo que, dentro de las políticas de protección para evitar los contagios masivos, se han sugerido estrategias de cuarentena y confinamiento en muchos países, que han originado alteraciones en la salud mental y el sueño. A través de la siguiente revisión narrativa se pretende sistematizar los hallazgos más significativos en cuanto a la presencia de insomnio en pacientes hospitalizados con COVID-19, y de personas sanas que han estado sometidas a confinamiento como medida preventiva. Las condiciones propias de la enfermedad han hecho que los pacientes desarrollen insomnio, lo que puede empeorar su estado de salud y alterar su sistema inmunológico. Para las personas sanas en cuarentena los cambios en el estilo de vida, el miedo a contraer la enfermedad, la edad joven, el sexo femenino, los antecedentes de enfermedades mentales y una menor capacidad de afrontamiento al estrés parecen ser factores de riesgo para el insomnio. Al igual que la implementación de medidas epidemiológicas de cuidado y prevención contra el COVID-19, se debe tener en consideración promover la higiene del sueño como una estrategia de afrontamiento integral contra esta pandemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Age Factors , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Mental Disorders/complications , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
6.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244873, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007115

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have highlighted the negative impact of COVID-19 and its particular effects on vulnerable sub-populations. Complementing this work, here, we report on the social patterning of self-reported positive changes experienced during COVID-19 national lockdown in Scotland. METHODS: The CATALYST study collected data from 3342 adults in Scotland during weeks 9-12 of a national lockdown. Using a cross-sectional design, participants completed an online questionnaire providing data on key sociodemographic and health variables, and completed a measure of positive change. The positive change measure spanned diverse domains (e.g., more quality time with family, developing new hobbies, more physical activity, and better quality of sleep). We used univariate analysis and stepwise regression to examine the contribution of a range of sociodemographic factors (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, educational attainment, and employment status) in explaining positive change. RESULTS: There were clear sociodemographic differences across positive change scores. Those reporting higher levels of positive change were female, from younger age groups, married or living with their partner, employed, and in better health. CONCLUSION: Overall our results highlight the social patterning of positive changes during lockdown in Scotland. These findings begin to illuminate the complexity of the unanticipated effects of national lockdown and will be used to support future intervention development work sharing lessons learned from lockdown to increase positive health change amongst those who may benefit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise/psychology , Family/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Scotland/epidemiology , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Hygiene , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e041995, 2020 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999259

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Jordan, a Middle Eastern country, declared a state of national emergency due to COVID-19 and a strict nationwide lockdown on 17 March 2020, banning all travel and movement around the country, potentially impacting mental health. This study sought to investigate the association between mental health (eg, anxiety and depressive symptoms) and sleep health among a sample of Jordanians living through a state of COVID-19-induced nationwide lockdown. METHODS: Using Facebook, participants (n=1240) in Jordan in March 2020 were recruited and direct to a web-based survey measuring anxiety (items from General Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale instrument), depressive symptoms (items from Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), sleep health (items from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and sociodemographic. A modified Poisson regression model with robust error variance. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) and 95% CIs were estimated to examine how anxiety and depressive symptoms may affect different dimensions of sleep health: (1) poor sleep quality, (2) short sleep duration, (3) encountering sleep problems. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported having experienced mild (33.8%), moderate (12.9%) or severe (6.3%) levels of anxiety during lockdown, and nearly half of respondents reported depressive symptoms during lockdown. Similarly, over 60% of participants reported having experienced at least one sleep problem in the last week, and nearly half reported having had short sleep duration. Importantly, anxiety was associated with poor sleep health outcomes. For example, corresponding to the dose-response relationship between anxiety and sleep health outcomes, those reporting severe anxiety were the most likely to experience poor sleep quality (aPR =8.95; 95% CI=6.12 to 13.08), short sleep duration (aPR =2.23; 95% CI=1.91 to 2.61) and at least one problem sleep problem (aPR=1.73; 95% CI=1.54 to 1.95). Moreover, depressive symptoms were also associated with poor sleep health outcomes. As compared with scoring in the first quartile, scoring fourth quartile was associated with poor sleep quality (aPR=11.82; 95% CI=6.64 to 21.04), short sleep duration (aPR=1.87; 95% CI=1.58 to 2.22), and experiencing at least one sleep problem (aPR=1.90; 95% CI=1.66 to 2.18). CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms can negatively influence sleep health among a sample of Jordanian adults living in a state of COVID-19-induced nationwide lockdown.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Depression/complications , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health/trends , Online Social Networking , Prevalence , Psychological Techniques , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Hygiene , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Sleep Med ; 77: 74, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960122
10.
J Sleep Res ; 30(1): e13142, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676388

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a significantly large number of psychological consequences, including sleep health. The present study evaluated sleep patterns, sleep disturbances, and associated factors in Chinese preschoolers confined at home during the COVID-19 outbreak. Caregivers of 1619 preschoolers (aged 4-6 years) recruited from 11 preschools in Zunyi, Guizhou province completed the Children's Sleep Habit Questionnaire (CSHQ) between 17th and 19th February 2020. Data were compared to a sociodemographically similar sample of preschoolers (included in the 11 preschools) in 2018. Compared to the 2018 sample, the confined preschoolers demonstrated changes in sleep patterns characterized by later bedtimes and wake times, longer nocturnal and shorter nap sleep durations, comparable 24-hr sleep duration, and fewer caregiver-reported sleep disturbances. Moreover, behavioural practices (sleeping arrangement, reduced electronic device use, regular diet) and parenting practices (harmonious family atmosphere and increased parent-child communication) were associated with less sleep disturbances in the confined sample. The present study provides the first description of the impact of prolonged home confinement during the COVID-19 outbreak on sleep patterns and sleep disturbances in preschoolers, as well as highlighting the importance of the link between sleep health and family factors. Given that disrupted and insufficient sleep has been linked to immune system dysfunction, our findings also have potential implications for resilience to infection in young children during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future studies should further explore deficient sleep as a risk factor for coronavirus infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep/physiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Outbreaks , Family Health/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Parent-Child Relations , Parenting/psychology , Polysomnography , Risk Factors , Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology , Sleep Hygiene/physiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(2)2020 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-604929

ABSTRACT

The corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak started in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and spread all over the world leading to declaration of a pandemic by World Health Organization (WHO) on 11th March 2020. Most countries around the world have been on lockdown in an effort to halt the spread of virus. People around the world have been pushed into uncharted waters of uncertainty, fear, anxiety, stress and depression due to economic crash down, job losses and fear for their own health and that of their loved ones. There is a known association between anxiety/stress and sleep disturbances and vice versa. The most vulnerable population in this isolation like condition, in this lockdown, are the chief earning member of the family, women, young ones, and people with psychiatric illness.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Social Isolation/psychology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Sleep Hygiene , Sleep Wake Disorders/prevention & control , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/etiology
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