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1.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 408, 2023 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between internet addiction disorder (IAD) and anxiety and depressive symptomatology in high school students in two private schools in Chiclayo, Peru, during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Analytical cross-sectional investigation of 505 adolescents from two private schools. The dependent variables were anxiety and depressive symptomatology, measured with the Beck Adapted Depression Questionnaire (BDI-IIA) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), respectively. The main independent variable was IAD, measured with the Internet Addiction Test instrument(IATI). Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated. RESULTS: The average age was 14.16 years and 54.9% were women. 22.2% and 3.2% presented mild and moderate IAD; respectively. 9.3% presented severe anxiety and 34.3% severe depressive symptomatology. In the simple regression, adolescents with mild, moderate and severe IAD presented 19% (PR = 1.19; 95%CI: 1.05-1.35), 25% (PR = 1.25; 95%CI: 1.02-1.53) and 53% (PR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.47-1.60) higher prevalence of depressive symptomatology; however, this association was not maintained in the multiple model. Anxiety increased 196% in adolescents with severe IAD (PR = 2.96; 95%CI: 1.86-4.71). CONCLUSION: We found that 2, 1, and 3 out of 10 students presented IAD, depressive symptomatology, and anxiety, respectively. We did not find an association between IAD and depressive symptomatology, but we did find an association with anxiety. Among the factors associated with the development of depressive symptomatology were the male sex, the presence of eating disorders, subclinical insomnia, using devices for more than 2 h, and using the Internet for academic activities. About anxiety, the associated factors are the female sex, the presence of eating disorders, subclinical insomnia, and the use of the Internet as social interaction. We recommend implementing counseling programs in view of the imminent introduction of the Internet as a pillar in education.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adolescent , Humans , Male , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Internet Addiction Disorder/epidemiology , Peru/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Internet , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology
2.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 996, 2023 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact global health and China requires a 14-day quarantine for individuals on flights with positive COVID-19 cases. This quarantine can impact mental well-being, including sleep. This study aims to examine the impact of psychosocial and behavioral factors on insomnia among individuals undergoing quarantine in hotels. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional survey carried out in Guangzhou, China. The data was gathered through online questionnaires distributed to international passengers who arrived in Guangzhou on flights and were required to undergo a 14-day quarantine in hotels arranged by the local government. The questionnaires were sent to the participants through the government health hotline "12,320." RESULTS: Of the 1003 passengers who were quarantined, 6.7% reported significant anxiety and 25.0% had varying degrees of insomnia. Anxiety was positively associated with insomnia (ß = 0.92, P < 0.001), while collectivism (ß = -0.07, P = 0.036), indoor exercise (ß = -0.50, P < 0.001), and the perceived people orientation of the public health service (ß = -0.20, P = 0.001) were negatively associated with insomnia. The study also identified moderating effects, such that a higher sense of collectivism, a greater frequency of indoor exercise, and a higher perception of the people-oriented of the public health service were associated with a lower impact of anxiety on insomnia. These moderating effects were also observed in participants with varying degrees of insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that a proportion of people undergoing entry quarantine experience insomnia and confirms how psychosocial and behavioral factors can alleviate insomnia in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
3.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0282622, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236980

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Sleep is critical to a person's physical and mental health, but there are few studies systematically assessing risk factors for sleep disorders. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for a sleep disorder through machine-learning and assess this methodology. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A retrospective, cross-sectional cohort study using the publicly available National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) was conducted in patients who completed the demographic, dietary, exercise, and mental health questionnaire and had laboratory and physical exam data. METHODS: A physician diagnosis of insomnia was the outcome of this study. Univariate logistic models, with insomnia as the outcome, were used to identify covariates that were associated with insomnia. Covariates that had a p<0.0001 on univariate analysis were included within the final machine-learning model. The machine learning model XGBoost was used due to its prevalence within the literature as well as its increased predictive accuracy in healthcare prediction. Model covariates were ranked according to the cover statistic to identify risk factors for insomnia. Shapely Additive Explanations (SHAP) were utilized to visualize the relationship between these potential risk factors and insomnia. RESULTS: Of the 7,929 patients that met the inclusion criteria in this study, 4,055 (51% were female, 3,874 (49%) were male. The mean age was 49.2 (SD = 18.4), with 2,885 (36%) White patients, 2,144 (27%) Black patients, 1,639 (21%) Hispanic patients, and 1,261 (16%) patients of another race. The machine learning model had 64 out of a total of 684 features that were found to be significant on univariate analysis (P<0.0001 used). These were fitted into the XGBoost model and an AUROC = 0.87, Sensitivity = 0.77, Specificity = 0.77 were observed. The top four highest ranked features by cover, a measure of the percentage contribution of the covariate to the overall model prediction, were the Patient Health Questionnaire depression survey (PHQ-9) (Cover = 31.1%), age (Cover = 7.54%), physician recommendation of exercise (Cover = 3.86%), weight (Cover = 2.99%), and waist circumference (Cover = 2.70%). CONCLUSION: Machine learning models can effectively predict risk for a sleep disorder using demographic, laboratory, physical exam, and lifestyle covariates and identify key risk factors.


Subject(s)
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Nutrition Surveys , Retrospective Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Risk Factors , Machine Learning
4.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 122(5. Vyp. 2): 29-34, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237093

ABSTRACT

The reorganization of treatment facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the working conditions of large numbers of the health workers (HW) worldwide. The implementation of professional activities in such realities has led to an increased risk of developing a number of psychological disorders, including insomnia. The percentage of insomnia in HW has increased significantly. The nurses were the most vulnerable, because they are women and they work in an understaffed environment. The influence of shift work and stress conditions on the risk of insomnia, methods of prevention and treatment of this disorder are thoroughly examined in the article.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology
5.
J Infect Public Health ; 16(8): 1281-1289, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231176

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) caring for COVID-19 infected patients are exposed to stressful and traumatic events with potential for severe and sustained adverse mental and physical health consequences. Our aim was to assess the magnitude of physical and mental health outcomes of HCWs due to the prolonged use of personal protective equipment (PPE) treating COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This cross-sectional study assessed the symptoms of stress, anxiety, insomnia, and psychological resilience using the Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics (SAVE) scale, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and Resilience Scale (RS), respectively, in Italy between 1st February and 31st March 2022. The physical outcomes reported included vertigo, dyspnea, nausea, micturition desire, retroauricular pain, thirst, discomfort at work, physical fatigue, and thermal stress. The relationships between prolonged PPE use and psychological outcomes and physical discomforts were analyzed using Generalized Linear Models (GLMs). We calculated the factor mean scores and a binary outcome to measure study outcomes. FINDINGS: We found that 23% of the respondents reported stress related symptoms, 33% anxiety, 43% moderate to severe insomnia, and 67% reported moderate to very low resilience. The GLMs suggested that older people (>55 years old) are less likely to suffer from stress compared to younger people (<35 y.o); conversely, HCW aged more than 35 years are more inclined to suffer from insomnia than younger people (<35 y.o). Female HCW reported a lower probability of resilience than males. University employed HCWs were less likely to report anxiety than those who worked in a community hospital. The odds of suffering from insomnia for social workers was significantly higher than for other HCWs. Female HCW>3 years old, enrolled in training programs for nursing, social work, technical training and other healthcare professionals increased the probability of reported physical discomforts. HCW that worked on non COVID-19 wards and used PPE for low-medium exposure level, were at lower risks for lasting physical side effects as compared to the HCW who worked in high-risk PPE intense, COVID-19 environments. INTERPRETATION: The study suggests that frontline HCWs who had extensive PPE exposure while directly engaged in the diagnosis, treatment, and care for patients with COVID-19 are at significant risks for lasting physical and psychological harm and distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Male , Humans , Female , Aged , Middle Aged , Child, Preschool , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment , Health Personnel/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Affect Disord ; 337: 50-56, 2023 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The number of COVID-19 infections has increased sharply and quickly after optimizing the COVID-19 response in China. In the context of this population-size infection, college students' psychological response is yet to be understood. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate anxiety, depression, insomnia, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among college students from December 31, 2022, to January 7, 2023. The questionnaire included the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Impact of Event Scale (IES-R), and self-designed questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 22,624 respondents, the self-reported prevalence of anxiety, depression, insomnia, PTSD, and any of the four psychological symptoms appeared as 12.7 %, 25.8 %, 11.6 %, 7.9 %, and 29.7 %, respectively. The self-reported COVID-19 infection rate was 80.2 %. Changes in the place for learning, longer time online, not recovering after infection, a higher proportion of family member infection, insufficient drug reserve, worry about sequela after infection, future studies, or employment contributed to a higher risk of anxiety/depression/insomnia symptoms or PTSD symptoms. Multinomial logistic regression showed that those who spent more extended time on the Internet, recovered after infection, and had insufficient drug reserves were less likely to have PTSD than anxiety/depression/insomnia symptoms. LIMITATIONS: The study was a non-probability sampling survey. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety, depression, insomnia, and PTSD were common psychological symptoms among college students when infection went through a large-scale population. This study highlights the importance of continuing to care for the psychological symptoms of college students, especially timely responses to their concerns related to the epidemic situation and COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Students/psychology , China/epidemiology
7.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1138147, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327357

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary care patients, especially those with an older age, are one of the most vulnerable populations for post-COVID-19 symptoms. Identifying predictors of post-COVID symptoms can help identify high-risk individuals for preventive care. Methods: Out of 977 primary care patients aged 55 years or above with comorbid physical and psychosocial conditions in a prospective cohort in Hong Kong, 207 patients infected in the previous 5-24 weeks were included. The three most common post-COVID-19 symptoms (breathlessness, fatigue, cognitive difficulty), which lasted beyond the 4-week acute infection period, were assessed using items from the COVID-19 Yorkshire Rehabilitation Scale (C19-YRS), together with other self-reported symptoms. Multivariable analyses were conducted to identify predictors of post-acute and long COVID-19 symptoms (5-24 weeks after infection). Results: The 207 participants had a mean age of 70.8 ± 5.7 years, 76.3% were female, and 78.7% had ≥2 chronic conditions. In total, 81.2% reported at least one post-COVID symptom (mean: 1.9 ± 1.3); 60.9, 56.5 and 30.0% reported fatigue, cognitive difficulty, and breathlessness respectively; 46.1% reported at least one other new symptom (such as other respiratory-related symptoms (14.0%), insomnia or poor sleep quality (14.0%), and ear/nose/throat symptoms (e.g., sore throat) (10.1%), etc.). Depression predicted post-COVID-19 fatigue. The female sex predicted cognitive difficulty. Receiving fewer vaccine doses (2 doses vs. 3 doses) was associated with breathlessness. Anxiety predicted a higher overall symptom severity level of the three common symptoms. Conclusion: Depression, the female sex, and fewer vaccine doses predicted post-COVID symptoms. Promoting vaccination and providing intervention to those at high-risk for post-COVID symptoms are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Adult , Female , Aged , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Chronic Disease , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , Primary Health Care
8.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285797, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325003

ABSTRACT

The need for physical distancing due to COVID-19 mitigation efforts forced prolonged social isolation, which may affect sleep and lead to mental health problems. Previous research has shown that young adults are particularly vulnerable to psychological stress caused by social isolation, the negative psychological impact of the pandemic, and greater frequency and severity of sleep problems. Therefore, the main goal of the present study was to examine whether insomnia could constitute a mediation mechanism that explains the relationship between social isolation experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic and mental health outcomes (depression and anxiety) reported up to 1.5 years later. The study was conducted among young (M±SD; 24.08±3.75) men (N = 1025) in Poland. Data were collected by means of self-report questionnaires, including The Social Isolation Index, The Athens Insomnia Scale, The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II). The results show that insomnia mediates the relationships between social isolation and both anxiety and depression. The current findings emphasize the role of insomnia in the relationships between social isolation experienced during COVID-19 and negative emotional states. From a clinical perspective, the results suggest that implementing therapeutic components that address social isolation in insomnia treatment programs may prevent the development of depression and anxiety symptoms among young men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Male , Young Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology
9.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e410, 2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316717

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Frontline healthcare workers (FHCWs) exposed to COVID-19 patients are at an increased risk of developing psychological burden. This study aims to determine the prevalence of mental health symptoms and associated factors among Mexican FHCWs attending COVID-19 patients. METHODS: FHCWs, including attending physicians, residents/fellows, and nurses providing care to COVID-19 patients at a private hospital in Monterrey, Mexico, were invited to answer an online survey between August 28, and November 30, 2020. Symptoms of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and insomnia were evaluated with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)-7, Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Multivariate analysis was performed to identify variables associated with each outcome. RESULTS: 131 FHCWs, 43.5% attending physicians, 19.8% residents/fellows, and 36.6% nurses were included. The overall prevalence of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and insomnia was 36%, 21%, 23%, and 24% respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that residents/fellows and nurses reported more depression and insomnia than attending physicians. Although not significant, residents/fellows were more likely to experience all symptoms than nurses. CONCLUSIONS: Mexican FHCWs, especially nurses and residents/fellows, experienced a significant psychological burden while attending to COVID-19 patients. Tailored interventions providing support to FHCWs during future outbreaks are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Prevalence , Mexico/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals
10.
BMC Neurol ; 23(1): 150, 2023 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294027

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the mental health, sleep and quality of life, especially in individuals with chronic disease. Therefore, the purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on neuropsychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, stress), sleep disorders (sleep quality, insomnia) and quality of life in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD), Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Seven databases (Medline, Embase, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Scielo and Lilacs) were searched between March 2020 and December 2022. Observational studies (i.e., cross-sectional, case-control, cohort) were included. GRADE approach was used to assess the quality of evidence and strength of the recommendation. Effect size was calculated using standardized mean differences (SMD; random effects model). A customized Downs and Black checklist was used to assess the risk of bias. RESULTS: Eighteen studies (PD = 7, MS = 11) were included. A total of 627 individuals with PD (healthy controls = 857) and 3923 individuals with MS (healthy controls = 2432) were analyzed. Twelve studies (PD = 4, MS = 8) were included in the meta-analysis. Individuals with PD had significantly elevated levels of depression (very low evidence, SMD = 0.40, p = 0.04) and stress (very low evidence, SMD = 0.60, p < 0.0001). There was no difference in anxiety (p = 0.08). Individuals with MS had significantly higher levels of depression (very low evidence, SMD = 0.73, p = 0.007) and stress (low evidence, SMD = 0.69, p = 0.03) and low quality of life (very low evidence, SMD = 0.77, p = 0.006). There was no difference in anxiety (p = 0.05) and sleep quality (p = 0.13). It was not possible to synthesize evidence in individuals with AD and sleep disorder (insomnia). CONCLUSION: In general, the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted individuals with PD and MS. Individuals with PD showed significantly higher levels of depression and stress; and individuals with MS presented significantly higher depression and stress levels, as well as significantly lower quality of life when compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in individuals with AD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Demyelinating Diseases , Parkinson Disease , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Parkinson Disease/complications , Parkinson Disease/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology
11.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 691, 2023 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305112

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, increased workload and stress could have increased mental health problems (anxiety and depression) in military personnel. However, the number of studies in military members is scarce, especially in regard to mental health. The objective of this study was determine the prevalence and factors associated with depression and anxiety in Peruvian military personnel. METHODS: We undertook an analytical cross-sectional study. The survey was distributed face to face between November 02 and 09, 2021, during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic among the military personnel. We used some instruments to measure depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder, GAD-7), insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index, ISI), food insecurity (Household Food Insecurity Access Scale, HFIAS), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaires, IPAQ-S), resilience (abbreviated CD-RISC), and fear of COVID-19 scale. The exclusion criteria included those who did not completely fill out the evaluation instruments. RESULTS: We analyzed the data of 615 military personnel that participated in the survey. Of them, 93.7% were male and the median age was 22 years old. There was a prevalence of 29.9% and 22.0% in regard to depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. In addition, it was found that being married (PR: 0.63; 95% IC: 0.42-0.94), having a relative with mental health problems (PR: 2.16), having experienced food insecurity (PR: 1.48), insomnia (PR: 2.71), fear of COVID-19 (PR: 1.48), and a high level of resilience (PR: 0.65) were factors associated with depression. In regard to anxiety, the factors associated were working for more than 18 months since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic (PR: 0.52), a high level of resilience (PR: 0.50; 95% IC: 0.33-0.77), insomnia (PR: 3.32), fear of COVID-19 (PR: 2.43). CONCLUSION: We found a prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety of 29.9% and 22.0%, respectively. In regard to the factors that attenuate depression, we can mention being married and having resilience; and among the aggravating factors, having a relative with mental health problems, food insecurity, insomnia, and fear of COVID-19. Finally, anxiety increased through working time, insomnia, and fear of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Adult , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Peru/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology
12.
BMC Womens Health ; 23(1): 210, 2023 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304371

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It has been more than 2 years since the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic destabilized the world, adversely affecting not only physical health, but also mental health. During this time, frontline medical workers were at a greater health risk, especially female medical workers. Changes or abnormalities in the menstrual cycle-an important indicator of women's health-may jeopardize female reproductive functioning. Considering that emotional health and sleep status may be related to the menstrual cycle, this study aimed to investigate the association between menstrual cycle changes, anxiety, sleep dysfunction, and other factors among female medical workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted by distributing online questionnaires to female medical workers in China from February to May 2022. The study included 160 women aged 18-45 years old. The questionnaires covered data related to the participants' sociodemographic characteristics, medical and reproductive history, and lifestyle. The Rating Scale for Clinical Manifestations of Menopathy (SCMM), Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), and Sleep Dysfunction Rating Scale (SDRS) were utilized. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests, t-tests, and linear regression analysis. RESULTS: A total of 160 female medical staff were randomly selected in this research, of whom seven scored less than 3 points, 85 scored 3-11 points, and 68 scored more than 11 points on the total score of the SCMM. Compared to pre-pandemic scores, scores of dizziness and tinnitus were significantly higher during the COVID-19 pandemic. Scores corresponding to the following clinical symptoms were also higher during the pandemic: Menopathy, including hypaphrodisia, dim complexion, abnormal urination, languidness, dim menstruation, thin menstruation, dysmenorrhea, and empty or saggy lower abdomen (p < 0.05). However, pre-pandemic scores of vaginal bleeding quantity were significantly higher than those found during the COVID-19 pandemic (p < 0.05). Scores of vaginal bleeding quantity were significantly lower in cabin hospitals than other types of hospitals, and a similar finding was observed for vaginal bleeding duration (all p < 0.05). Moreover, the findings of the univariable and multivariable linear regression analysis revealed a link between consistent exercise, the underlying illness, the SDRS score, the SAS score, and the total score of SCMM (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found that menstruation in female medical workers was affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, regular exercise and good physical condition were protective factors, while anxiety and insomnia were risk factors for menstrual abnormalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Female , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Anxiety/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Uterine Hemorrhage , Depression/etiology
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(8)2023 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300908

ABSTRACT

Air traffic bans in response to the spread of the coronavirus have changed the sound situation of urban areas around airports. This study aimed to investigate the effect of this unprecedented event on the community response to noise before and after the international flight operation at Tan Son Nhat Airport (TSN) in March 2020. The "before" survey was conducted in August 2019, and the two "after" surveys were conducted in June and September 2020. Structural equation models (SEMs) for noise annoyance and insomnia were developed by linking the questionnaire items of the social surveys. The first effort aimed to achieve a common model of noise annoyance and insomnia, corresponding to the situation before and after the change, respectively. Approximately, 1200 responses were obtained from surveys conducted in 12 residential areas around TSN in 2019 and 2020. The average daily flight numbers observed in August 2019 during the two surveys conducted in 2020 were 728, 413, and 299, respectively. The sound pressure levels of the 12 sites around TSN decreased from 45-81 dB (mean = 64, SD = 9.8) in 2019 to 41-76 dB (mean = 60, SD = 9.8) and 41-73 dB (mean = 59, SD = 9.3) in June and September 2020, respectively. The SEM indicated that the residents' health was related to increased annoyance and insomnia.


Subject(s)
Aviation , Noise, Transportation , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Airports , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Nuclear Family , Aircraft , Environmental Exposure
14.
Int J Clin Pract ; 2023: 6746045, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297221

ABSTRACT

Objective: COVID-19 has evolved into a major global public health event. The number of people reporting insomnia is growing exponentially during the pandemic. This study aimed to explore the relationship between aggravated insomnia and COVID-19-induced psychological impact on the public, lifestyle changes, and anxiety about the future. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we used the questionnaires from 400 subjects who were obtained from the Department of Encephalopathy of the Wuhan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine between July 2020 and July 2021. The data collected for the study included demographic characteristics of the participants and psychological scales consisting of the Spiegel Sleep Questionnaire, the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S), the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). The independent sample t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to compare the results. Correlation analysis of variables affecting insomnia was performed using Pearson correlation analysis. The degree of influence of the variables on insomnia was determined using linear regression, and a regression equation was derived. Results: A total of 400 insomnia patients participated in the survey. The median age was 45.75 ± 15.04 years. The average score of the Spiegel Sleep Questionnaire was 17.29 ± 6.36, that of SAS was 52.47 ± 10.39, that of SDS was 65.89 ± 8.72, and that of FCV-19S was 16.09 ± 6.81. The scores of FCV-19S, SAS, and SDS were closely related to insomnia, and the influencing degree was in the following order: fear, depression, and anxiety (OR = 1.30, 0.709, and 0.63, respectively). Conclusion: Fear of COVID-19 can be one of the primary contributors to worsening insomnia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Linear Models , Sleep Quality , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Regression Analysis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology
15.
Respirology ; 28(6): 518-524, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274595

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 AND SLEEP: The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increase in insomnia and impaired sleep quality Health care workers are particularly susceptible and improved with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) Long COVID has significant effects on sleep OSA impacts on the severity of acute COVID-19 illness OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNOEA: Large trials of clinically representative patients confirm the cardiovascular benefits of CPAP treatment in OSA CPAP may improve long-term cognitive outcomes in OSA, but further research is needed Racial disparities in OSA prevalence and mortality risk are becoming evident Periodic evaluation of OSA risk in pregnancy is important as timing may be key for intervention to prevent or treat cardiovascular risk factors INSOMNIA: Comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnoea (COMISA) can frequently co-exist and the combined negative effects of both may be deleterious, particularly to cardiovascular health There is evidence for effectiveness with novel orexin receptor antagonists.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/complications , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/epidemiology , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/therapy
16.
PeerJ ; 11: e15039, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262368

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Healthcare professionals play a great role in the struggle against COVID-19. They are highly susceptible to COVID-19 due to their responsibilities. This susceptibility directly affects their mental health status. Comprehensive evidence on prevalence of depression and insomnia during this pandemic is vital. Thus, this study aims to provide the pooled prevalence of depression and insomnia, and their associated factors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and methods: This systematic review and meta-analysis follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies were searched from PubMed, Cochrane Library, CrossRef, African Journals Online and Google Scholar databases from the occurence of the pandemic to June 2022. Study selection, data extraction and methodological quality assessment were done by two authors independently. The I 2 statistics was used for testing heterogeneity. A random effect model was used. Stata version 16.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Eight studies were incorporated for this systematic review and meta-analysis. From seven studies the pooled prevalence of depression was 40% (95% CI [0.23-0.57]; I 2 = 99.00%; P = 0.00). From three studies the pooled prevalence of insomnia was 35% (95% CI [0.13-0.58]; I 2 = 98.20; P = 0.00). Associated factors of depression on healthcare workers (HCWs) were being female pooled AOR: 2.09; 95% CI [1.41-2.76], been married (pooled AOR = 2.95; 95% CI [1.83-4.07]). Due to limited studies available on the factors associated with insomnia, it is impossible to pool and associated factors were presented in narrative synthesis. Conclusion: COVID-19 is highly associated with the prevalence of depression and insomnia among healthcare professionals in Ethiopia. The pooled prevalence of depression and insomnia were significantly higher among healthcare professionals. Appropriate psychological counseling package should be realized for healthcare workers (HCWs) in order to recover the general mental health problems. Trial registration. This review was registered PROSPERO with registration number CRD42022314865.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Depression/epidemiology , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Delivery of Health Care
17.
Libyan J Med ; 18(1): 2182704, 2023 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261482

ABSTRACT

Given the high prevalence of sleep disorders (e.g. insomnia) among long-COVID-19 patients (LC19Ps), approaches to tackle these disorders should not only depend on sleep specialists, but they should also involve general practitioners (GPs). Indeed, according to the World Health Organization, GPs should be on the front line in the management of LC19Ps. However, in real practice, little data with regard to the management of LC19Ps are available for GPs, which represents an embarrassing situation. Thus, the main aim of this correspondence was to provide GPs with some advice related to the management of sleep disorders in LC19Ps. The pieces advice presented in this correspondence are related to: i) Early and accurate recognition of sleep disorders, ii) General recommendations to manage sleep disorders in LC19Ps (e.g. encouraging vaccination against the virus); and iii) Specific recommendations, such as improving sleep hygiene (patients' behavior and diet), psychological or behavioral therapies (stimulus control therapy, relaxation, sleep restriction), promising tools (heart coherence, neurofeedback), and pharmacological treatment. The authors of this correspondence deeply believe that given the undesirable side effects associated with the use of hypnotics, the pharmacological approach must only be a "last resort". The authors believe that an important percentage of pharmacological prescriptions could be avoided if more focus is put on educating GPs to provide LC19Ps with more tools to deal with sleep disorders. The pieces advice presented in this correspondence are indispensable to resume the normal life of LC19Ps and to promote their mental health recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practitioners , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Hypnotics and Sedatives
18.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 2912, 2023 02 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261469

ABSTRACT

During COVID-19 pandemic, quality of living was impacted by social isolation, loneliness, and altered sleep habits. The aims of this study were (1) to examine the relationship between physical activity (PA) levels with insomnia and loneliness among adults during Spain's first COVID-19 wave of lockdown and its impact on women and (2) to examine the digital technologic resources used to support both PA and other recreational activities in women. A cross-sectional design was used. An anonymous 15-min online survey was conducted in Spain to adults (≥ 18 years old) during the first COVID-19 lockdown, a 40-day period. A snowball distribution method was employed using personal email and social networks (Facebook, Whatsapp, Linkedin, Twitter). Variables studied included: socio-demographic items, insomnia, loneliness, PA, and digital technologic resources. A total of 996 adults (females = 663, 66.6%) completed the survey. Higher education levels were associated with greater PA levels (p-value < 0.001). Women presented with higher insomnia risk than men with low PA levels (OR = 1.9, CI = 1.25; 2.95). Living with family members or other individuals was related to lower insomnia risk. A strong correlation between medium-high PA levels was found with greater digital technology resources (DTS) than individuals with low PA levels. Females used significantly more DTS than males (p-value < 0.001). No significant associations between DTS were found with age or academic education level. PA levels, sex, and loneliness were related to insomnia risk. A strong correlation between PA and DTS use was observed. Participants with medium-high PA levels and females use them more than those with low PA levels and males. We recommend promoting the PA through digital technologies for women. This recommendation would also improve sleep disorders in women who present higher insomnia risks than men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Male , Adult , Humans , Female , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Loneliness , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise
19.
CMAJ Open ; 11(1): E191-E200, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281374

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the relationship between workplace support and mental health and burnout among health care professionals (HCPs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this cohort study, we sought to evaluate the association between perceived level of (and changes to) workplace support and mental health and burnout among HCPs, and to identify what constitutes perceived effective workplace support. METHODS: Online surveys at baseline (July-September 2020) and follow-up 4 months later assessed the presence of generalized anxiety disorder (using the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale [GAD-7]), clinical insomnia, major depressive disorder (using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire), burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and mental well-being (using the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Score). Both surveys assessed self-reported level of workplace support (single-item Likert scale). For baseline and follow-up, independently, we developed separate logistic regression models to evaluate the association of the level of workplace support (tricohotomized as unsupported, neither supported nor unsupported and supported) with mental health and burnout. We also developed linear regression models to evaluate the association between the change in perceived level of workplace support and the change in mental health scores from baseline and follow-up. We used thematic analyses on free-text entries of the baseline survey to evaluate what constitutes effective support. RESULTS: At baseline (n = 1422) and follow-up (n = 681), HCPs who felt supported had reduced risk of anxiety, depression, clinical insomnia, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, compared with those who felt unsupported. Among those who responded to both surveys (n = 681), improved perceived level of workplace support over time was associated with significantly improved scores on measures of anxiety (adjusted ß -0.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.25 to -0.01), depression (adjusted ß -0.17, 95% CI -0.29 to -0.04) and mental well-being (adjusted ß 0.19, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.29), independent of baseline level of support. We identified 5 themes constituting effective workplace support, namely concern or understanding for welfare, information, tangible qualities of the workplace, leadership and peer support. INTERPRETATION: We found a significant association between perceived level of (and changes in) workplace support and mental health and burnout of HCPs, and identified potential themes that constitute perceived workplace support. Collectively, these findings can inform changes in guidance and national policies to improve mental health and burnout among HCPs. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT04433260.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Mental Health , Cohort Studies , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Workplace , Health Personnel
20.
BMJ Lead ; 7(1): 16-20, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280059

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although several studies highlighted the psychological burden of 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, no data are available regarding professionals leading healthcare organisations. This study aims to assess the psychological impact of COVID-19 on healthcare leaders (HeLs), along with the leadership skills and coping strategies needed for successful leadership. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Friuli-Venezia Giulia (Italy) between October and November 2020. We assessed the presence of depressive symptoms (DS), anxiety symptoms (AS), perceived stress (PS) and insomnia using internationally validated tools. Coping strategies and skills needed to overcome the crisis were examined, along with the most challenging phases. RESULTS: A total of 48 HeLs participated. The prevalence of DS and AS was 14.6% and 12.5%, respectively. Moderate and severe insomnia was found in 12.5% and 6.3% of them, respectively. Leaders showed moderate (45.8%) and high 4,2%) level of PS. The two most challenging phases were recognised in early recognition (45.2%) and peak phase (31.0%). Concerning healthcare leaders' skills required to manage with pandemic, the most reported were communication (35.1%) and decision-making (25.5%). CONCLUSION: The high level of PS, insomnia, DS and AS experienced by healthcare leaders shows the COVID-19 pandemic's psychological impact. The two most challenging phases identified enhances the importance of public health surveillance and monitoring systems, and communication appeared a critical success skill for healthcare leaders. Given the key role these professional play in addressing the current crisis in healthcare organisations, their mental health and well-being deserve greater attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care
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