Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 43
Filter
1.
Acta Biomed ; 93(1): e2022019, 2022 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754149

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE WORK: The prevalence of insomnia is higher in COVID-19 survivors. However, there is little information about his associated variables. The aimed to know the prevalence and variables associated with insomnia among COVID-19 survivors in Colombian adults. METHOD: Three hundred and thirty COVID-19 survivors participated in a cross-sectional study. Insomnia was quantified with the Athens Insomnia Scale (cut-off score ≤ 6, Cronbach's alpha of 0.90). RESULTS: COVID-19 survivors were between 18 and 89 years (Mean = 47.7, SD = 15.2); the majority were women (61.5%), university-educated (62.4%), low income (71.2%), married or free union (66.1%), not healthcare workers (85.8%), without comorbidities (63.0%), asymptomatic or mild COVID-19 (66.1%), duration of COVID-19 symptoms in less than three weeks (80.0%) and remission of symptoms less two months by the day of study participation (73.0%). Scores on the Athens Insomnia Scale were observed between 0 and 24 (M = 7.3, SD = 5.1, Me = 7, IQR = 3 - 10), 60% presented insomnia. Insomnia was associated with post-traumatic stress symptoms (OR = 8.8, 95%CI 2.7 - 29.5), COVID-19 symptoms for more than three weeks (OR = 2.1, 95%CI 1.1 - 3.9), female gender (OR = 1.9, 95%CI 1.2 - 3.2) and married or free union marital status (OR = 1.8, 95%CI 1.1 - 3.0). CONCLUSION: The frequency of insomnia in COVID-19 survivors is high and mainly related to post-traumatic stress, symptoms of COVID-19 for more than three weeks, and the female gender. It is necessary to implement follow-up studies over time to evaluate the persistence of insomnia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Colombia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Survivors
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(2): 678-685, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675566

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 infection can cause impairments in many cognitive areas. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive functions of patients who had been infected with COVID-19. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The demographic and infection-related characteristics of patients who had been infected with COVID-19 were determined. Their cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were recorded. The Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE), clock drawing test, forward and backward digit span tests, visual memory test, and Frontal Assessment Battery were applied to the patients. Finger agnosia and ideomotor apraxia were also determined. RESULTS: The study included 176 patients [100 female (56.8%), 76 male (43.2%), mean age 66.09±13.96 years]. About half of the patients were hospitalized for symptoms of COVID-19 infection (n=82, 46.6%). One third of these patients required intensive care (n=26, 14.8%). While 50 (45.9%) of the 109 patients diagnosed with dementia before infection were hospitalized, 32 (47.8%) of the 67 patients without a diagnosis of dementia required hospitalization (p=0.46). The most common neurological finding during COVID-19 infection was insomnia (n=36, 20.5%). The MMSE and visual memory test scores of the patients who were hospitalized for severe respiratory distress were lower than those whose treatment at home was completed (respectively 17.92±7.69/20.59±7.01, p=0.02; 2.53 ±1.73/3.69±2.80, p=0.01). The patients with moderate to severe cognitive impairment had significantly higher CRP levels at admission than the others (37.52±43.09/20.93±31.74, p=0.01, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive damage in COVID-19 infection may be caused by ACE receptor density in the pial, hippocampal, and amygdala areas. In addition, the reason why people with severe dementia have a milder infection might be explained by the atrophy in these areas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dementia/diagnosis , Electroencephalography , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Neuropsychological Tests , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597023

ABSTRACT

The sleep-wake cycle plays a fundamental role in maintaining the physiological balance of our body. Its alteration favours the genesis of several organic alterations and diseases including sleep disorders and the consumption of several substances of abuse. It has been reported that the work activity, especially that carried out during the night, is able to influence the sleep-wake cycle, promoting the development of insomnia, which, in turn, would subject the worker to a stressful condition such as to encourage adverse behaviour such as the use/abuse of psychotropic substances. Based on the above premises, the aim of our research was to evaluate, in night workers: (i) the pattern of consumption of alcoholic beverages; (ii) the presence of insomnia; and (iii) the possible correlation between alcohol consumption and insomnia disorder. We used the AUDIT-C test (the abbreviated version of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) and the Insomnia Severity Index to assess alcohol consumption and insomnia disorder, respectively. All questionnaires were completed by workers of both sexes belonging to different types of work activities, exclusively day or night. The results of our research show a higher propensity of night workers to consume alcoholic beverages than those who work during daytime hours, often in binge-drinking mode. In addition, an increase in the amount of alcohol consumed was found to be related to insomnia disorder, especially in night workers. This study provides further awareness of the importance of the negative impact of alcohol consumption on sleep quality in night workers.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Alcoholism/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Sleep , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260259, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After recovery from acute infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), many patients experience long-term symptoms in different body systems. The aim of the present study was to identify these symptoms, their severity, and their duration as a first step in building a system to classify post-recovery long-term symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: An online-based cross-sectional survey was administered between September and October 2020. Data regarding the severity of post-recovery symptoms and their duration were collected using an Arabic questionnaire divided into six categories encompassing the 20 most prevalent symptoms. RESULTS: A total of 979 patients recovered from COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia in the study period, of whom 53% were male and 47% were female. The most common symptoms included general fatigue and weakness (73% each), with moderate severity of neurological symptoms including mood changes (41%) and insomnia (39%). Among the special senses, loss of smell and taste of marked severity were reported by 64% and 55% among respiratory symptoms, cough of mild severity (47%), and dyspnea of moderate severity (43%). Loss of appetite of moderate severity was reported in 42%, and diarrhea, abdominal pain, and nausea of mild severity were reported by 53%, 50%, and 44% of respondents, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term symptoms after recovery from COVID-19 warrant patient follow-up. The authors propose a classification system as a starting point to guide the identification and follow-up of long-term symptoms post-recovery, and recommend larger-scale studies to broaden the definition of recovery from COVID-19, which appears to have two phases, acute and chronic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Cough/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
Drug Discov Ther ; 15(5): 254-260, 2021 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542928

ABSTRACT

Post COVID-19 sequelae are a constellation of symptoms often reported after recovering from COVID-19. There is a need to better understand the clinical spectrum and long-term course of this clinical entity. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical features and risk factors of post COVID-19 sequelae in the North Indian population. This prospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary healthcare centre in Northern India between October 2020 and February 2021. Patients aged >18 years with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were recruited after at least two weeks of diagnosis, and details were captured. A total of 1234 patients were recruited and followed up for a median duration of 91 days (IQR: 45-181 days). Among them, 495 (40.1%) had persistent symptoms post-discharge or recovery. In 223 (18.1%) patients, the symptoms resolved within four weeks; 150 (12.1%) patients had symptoms till 12 weeks, and 122 (9.9%) patients had symptoms beyond 12 weeks of diagnosis/symptom-onset of COVID-19. Most common symptoms included myalgia (10.9%), fatigue (5.5%), shortness of breath (6.1%), cough (2.1%), insomnia (1.4%), mood disturbances (0.48%) and anxiety (0.6%). Patients who were hospitalized were more likely to report fatigue as a feature of long COVID. Hypothyroidism (OR: 4.13, 95% CI: 2.2-7.6, p-value < 0.001) and hypoxia (SpO2 ≤ 93%) (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.4, p-value 0.012) were identified as risk factors for long COVID sequelae. In conclusion, long COVID symptoms were common (22%), and 9.9% had the post COVID-19 syndrome. Myalgias, fatigue and dyspnoea were common symptoms. Patients with hypothyroidism and hypoxia during acute illness were at higher risk of long COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/etiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Young Adult
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542535

ABSTRACT

It is still debated whether lockdown conditions in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) health crisis seriously affected children's sleep. For young children, some studies identified more insomnia, while others only transient disturbances, or even no effect. Based on the premise of mother-child synchrony, a well-known dynamic established in child development research, we hypothesized that principally, the children whose mothers perceived the lockdown as stressful and/or responded maladaptively, suffered sleep disturbances. The main objective of this study was to identify the family profiles, variables, and lockdown responses most linked to insomnia in young children. The sample consisted of 165 mothers, French vs. Swiss origin (accounting for different lockdown severities), of children 6 months to 5 years old. Validated sleep, stress, and behavior scales were used. Multiple regression, age-matched clustering, and structural equation modeling analyses provided evidence that insomnia in young children is indeed strongly linked to the mother's reaction to the pandemic and lockdown. Specifically, reactions such as COVID-19 fear/anxiety and obsessive COVID-19 information seeking coincide with heightened vigilance, cascading into reduced child social contact, outings, and increased screen viewing, ultimately culminating in child insomnia and behavioral problems. Mother education level and child day care quality (e.g., home-schooling) were also identified as strong insomnia predictors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology
7.
Hypertension ; 79(2): 325-334, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476907

ABSTRACT

In a cross-sectional analysis of a case-control study in 2015, we revealed the association between increased arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity) and aircraft noise exposure. In June 2020, we evaluated the long-term effects, and the impact of a sudden decline in noise exposure during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown, on blood pressure and pulse wave velocity, comparing 74 participants exposed to long-term day-evening-night aircraft noise level >60 dB and 75 unexposed individuals. During the 5-year follow-up, the prevalence of hypertension increased in the exposed (42% versus 59%, P=0.048) but not in the unexposed group. The decline in noise exposure since April 2020 was accompanied with a significant decrease of noise annoyance, 24-hour systolic (121.2 versus 117.9 mm Hg; P=0.034) and diastolic (75.1 versus 72.0 mm Hg; P=0.003) blood pressure, and pulse wave velocity (10.2 versus 8.8 m/s; P=0.001) in the exposed group. Less profound decreases of these parameters were noticed in the unexposed group. Significant between group differences were observed for declines in office and night-time diastolic blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. Importantly, the difference in the reduction of pulse wave velocity between exposed and unexposed participants remained significant after adjustment for covariates (-1.49 versus -0.35 m/s; P=0.017). The observed difference in insomnia prevalence between exposed and unexposed individuals at baseline was no more significant at follow-up. Thus, long-term aircraft noise exposure may increase the prevalence of hypertension and accelerate arterial stiffening. However, even short-term noise reduction, as experienced during the COVID-19 lockdown, may reverse those unfavorable effects.


Subject(s)
Aircraft , Blood Pressure/physiology , COVID-19 , Environmental Exposure , Noise, Transportation/adverse effects , Noise/adverse effects , Quarantine , Vascular Stiffness/physiology , Aged , Arteriosclerosis/epidemiology , Arteriosclerosis/etiology , Female , Harm Reduction , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/etiology , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Pulse Wave Analysis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Urban Health
8.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 109: 106540, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363910

ABSTRACT

There are currently no validated pharmacotherapies for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related insomnia. The purpose of the National Adaptive Trial for PTSD-Related Insomnia (NAP Study) is to efficiently compare to placebo the effects of three insomnia medications with different mechanisms of action that are already prescribed widely to veterans diagnosed with PTSD within U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers. This study plans to enroll 1224 patients from 34 VA Medical Centers into a 12- week prospective, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial comparing trazodone, eszopiclone, and gabapentin. The primary outcome measure is insomnia, assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index. A novel aspect of this study is its adaptive design. At the recruitment midpoint, an interim analysis will be conducted to inform a decision to close recruitment to any "futile" arms (i.e. arms where further recruitment is very unlikely to yield a significant result) while maintaining the overall study recruitment target. This step could result in the enrichment of the remaining study arms, enhancing statistical power for the remaining comparisons to placebo. This study will also explore clinical, actigraphic, and biochemical predictors of treatment response that may guide future biomarker development. Lastly, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this study will allow the consenting process and follow-up visits to be conducted via video or phone contact if in-person meetings are not possible. Overall, this study aims to identify at least one effective pharmacotherapy for PTSD-related insomnia, and, perhaps, to generate definitive negative data to reduce the use of ineffective insomnia medications. NATIONAL CLINICAL TRIAL (NCT) IDENTIFIED NUMBER: NCT03668041.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Veterans , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/drug therapy , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/drug therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
9.
Cancer ; 127(24): 4636-4645, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic may induce post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among patients with cancer, who also face adaptations to their treatment. The authors assessed the occurrence of PTSD symptoms, investigated pandemic-induced adjustments in medical oncology practice in patients with cancer, and explored risk factors for PTSD and the association between PTSD symptoms, insomnia, and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: This prospective French study was conducted in patients with solid/hematologic tumors who were receiving medical treatment in the day care departments of 2 cancer centers during the lockdown. Adjustments to medical oncology practice were collected from medical records. PTSD (measured using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised), insomnia (measured using the Insomnia Severity Index), QoL (measured using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General instrument), and cognitive complaints (measured using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function instrument) were collected through validated questionnaires. RESULTS: Clinical data and questionnaires were available for 734 and 576 patients, respectively. The median patient age was 64 years, and 69% of patients were women. Twenty-one percent of patients had PTSD. Twenty-seven percent (95% CI, 23%-30%) had an adjustment in their medical oncology program, including adjournments (29%), treatment interruptions (16%), modified treatment plans (27%), or adapted monitoring (27%). Women and patients experiencing an adjustment in oncology practice had a higher odds of PTSD (odds ratio= 2.10 [95% CI, 1.07-4.14] and 1.65 [95% CI, 1.03-2.63]; P < .05). PTSD symptoms were correlated with worse scores for QoL, cognition, and insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-one percent of patients with cancer experienced PTSD symptoms associated with poor QoL during the first COVID-19-induced lockdown. Medical oncology practice was adjusted in approximately one-quarter of patients and was associated with the occurrence of PTSD symptoms. Psychosocial support should be offered in cancer centers to promote emotional resilience and avoid PTSD symptoms in patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Day Care, Medical , Neoplasms , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , France , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
10.
J Sleep Res ; 31(1): e13450, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334493

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on physical and mental health worldwide. While pandemic-related stress has also been linked to increased insomnia, scarce research has examined this association in nationally representative samples of high-risk populations, such as military veterans. We evaluated pre- and pandemic-related factors associated with new-onset and exacerbated insomnia symptoms in a nationally representative sample of 3,078 US military veterans who participated in the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study. Veterans were surveyed in the USA in 11/2019 (pre-pandemic) and again in 11/2020 (peri-pandemic). The Insomnia Severity Index was used to assess severity of insomnia symptoms at the pre- and peri-pandemic assessments. Among veterans without clinical or subthreshold insomnia symptoms pre-pandemic (n = 2,548), 11.5% developed subthreshold (10.9%) or clinical insomnia symptoms (0.6%) during the pandemic; among those with subthreshold insomnia symptoms pre-pandemic (n = 1,058; 26.0%), 8.0% developed clinical insomnia symptoms. Pre-pandemic social support (21.9% relative variance explained), pandemic-related stress related to changes in family relationships (20.5% relative variance explained), pre-pandemic chest pain (18.5% relative variance explained) and weakness (11.1% relative variance explained), and posttraumatic stress disorder (8.2% relative variance explained) explained the majority of the variance in new-onset subthreshold or clinical insomnia symptoms during the pandemic. Among veterans with pre-pandemic subthreshold insomnia, pandemic-related home isolation restrictions (59.1% relative variance explained) and financial difficulties (25.1% relative variance explained) explained the majority of variance in incident clinical insomnia symptoms. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that nearly one in five US veterans developed new-onset or exacerbated insomnia symptoms during the pandemic, and identify potential targets for prevention and treatment efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Veterans , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
11.
Int J Psychophysiol ; 167: 86-93, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305246

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has become a long-term problem, and global pandemic conditions may persist for years. Researchers are providing mounting evidence of relationships between COVID-19 lockdowns and sleep problems. However, few studies have investigated the impact of home isolation on sleep time perception, especially in comparable social isolation situations with similar pressures. Subjective sleep time perception parameters were derived from sleep diaries. Objective parameters were derived from actigraphy. Subjective and objective data were obtained between February 17 and February 27, 2020 from 70 adult participants subject to COVID-19 related lockdown provisions in China. We divided participants into a home stayers (HS) group (subject to full stay-at home orders) and an area-restricted workers (ARW) group (permitted to work at their nearby workplaces). The HS group demonstrated significantly delayed actigraphy-defined sleep onset time compared to self-reported sleep onset time; this effect was absent in the ARW group. Between-group differences in actigraphy-defined sleep onset time and significant between-group differences for actigraphy-defined and self-reported wake-up time were observed. HS group participants also presented significantly delayed actigraphy-defined wake-up time compared with self-reported wake-up time. No significant effect was found on total sleep time perception. Moreover, sleep/wake time misperception were found to be associated with daylight exposure and physical activity levels respectively. To the extent they are generalizable, these results suggest that lockdown restrictions can affect sleep onset and wake-up time perception but not total sleep time perception. Public health policy should consider such effects in the present pandemic situation and in future emergent public health situations.


Subject(s)
Actigraphy , COVID-19 , Medical Records , Pandemics , Quarantine/psychology , Self Report , Sleep , Adult , China , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Female , Humans , Light , Male , Middle Aged , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Stages , Sleep Wake Disorders , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11416, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253987

ABSTRACT

The first COVID-19 contagion wave caused unprecedented restraining measures worldwide. In Italy, a period of generalized lockdown involving home confinement of the entire population was imposed for almost two months (9 March-3 May 2020). The present is the most extensive investigation aimed to unravel the demographic, psychological, chronobiological, and work-related predictors of sleep disturbances throughout the pandemic emergency. A total of 13,989 Italians completed a web-based survey during the confinement period (25 March-3 May). We collected demographic and lockdown-related work changes information, and we evaluated sleep quality, insomnia and depression symptoms, chronotype, perceived stress, and anxiety using validated questionnaires. The majority of the respondents reported a negative impact of confinement on their sleep and a delayed sleep phase. We highlighted an alarming prevalence of sleep disturbances during the lockdown. Main predictors of sleep disturbances identified by regression models were: female gender, advanced age, being a healthcare worker, living in southern Italy, confinement duration, and a higher level of depression, stress, and anxiety. The evening chronotype emerged as a vulnerability factor, while morning-type individuals showed a lower predisposition to sleep and psychological problems. Finally, working from home was associated with less severe sleep disturbances. Besides confirming the role of specific demographic and psychological factors in developing sleep disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic, we propose that circadian typologies could react differently to a particular period of reduced social jetlag. Moreover, our results suggest that working from home could play a protective role against the development of sleep disturbances during the current pandemic emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Teleworking , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Circadian Rhythm/physiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Photoperiod , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/physiopathology , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/physiopathology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
13.
Rev Psiquiatr Salud Ment (Engl Ed) ; 14(2): 106-112, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240607

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: After the outbreak of the COVID-19 was considered a global pandemic in March 2020, the state of alarm was declared in Spain. In this situation, health professionals are experiencing high levels of stress due to the overload of work the pandemic is generating and the conditions in which they are working. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors that can destabilize the mental health of these professionals in our context. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample was composed of 421 health professionals. The data were gathered by an online questionnaire sent to them by e-mail. The DASS-21 was used to assess anxiety, stress and depression, and the EAI to measure sleep difficulties. In addition, other descriptive variables that could be related to psychological symptomatology were collected from the sample. RESULTS: The results show that the COVID-19 pandemic has generated symptoms of stress, anxiety, depression and insomnia among health workers, with higher levels among women and older professionals. Some factors such as having been in contact with the virus or fear at work, triggered greater symptomatology. CONCLUSIONS: In this critical situation, professionals are in the front line and therefore, are directly exposed to certain risks and stressors. This contributes to the development of diverse psychological symptoms. Consequently, it is recommended to offer them psychological help in order to reduce the emotional impact of the COVID-19, and thus, to ensure not only the mental health of our health professionals, but also the adequate care they provide.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Spain/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Psychosom Med ; 83(4): 328-337, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218022

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and related lockdown measures have raised important questions about the impact on mental health. This study evaluated several mental health and well-being indicators in a large sample from the United Kingdom (UK) during the COVID-19 lockdown where the death rate is currently among the highest in Europe. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey with a study sample that mirrors general population norms according to sex, age, education, and region was launched 4 weeks after lockdown measures were implemented in the UK. Measures included mental health-related quality of life (World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Brief Version psychological domain), well-being (World Health Organization Well-Being Index), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale-10), and insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index). Analyses of variances, Bonferroni-corrected post hoc tests, and t tests were applied to examine mental health indicators across different sociodemographic groups (age, sex, employment, income, physical activity, relationship status). RESULTS: The sample comprised n = 1006 respondents (54% women) from all regions of the UK. Approximately 52% of respondents screened positive for a common mental disorder, and 28% screened positive for clinical insomnia. Mean scores and standard deviations were as follows: Patient Health Questionnaire-9, mean = 9.0 ± 7.7; Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, mean = 8.0 ± 6.5; Insomnia Severity Index, mean = 10.4 ± 7.0; Perceived Stress Scale-10, mean = 17.7 ± 7.9; World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Brief Version, mean = 58.6 ± 21.4; and World Health Organization Well-Being Index score, mean = 13.0 ± 6.0. Statistical analyses consistently indicated more severe mental health problems in adults younger than 35 years, women, people with no work, and people with low income (all p values < .05). Mental health indices also varied across UK regions. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of depressive, anxiety, and insomnia symptoms is significantly higher in the UK relative to prepandemic epidemiological data. Further studies are needed to clarify the causes for these high rates of mental health symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Middle Aged , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Int J Occup Med Environ Health ; 34(2): 263-273, 2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197681

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The study aimed to investigate the direct and indirect - mediated through insomnia - effect of coronavirus anxiety on exhaustion, from the perspective of Hobfoll's theory of conservation of resources (COR). According to the COR theory, critical events (e.g., the coronavirus epidemic) make people fearful of losing their valuable resources. A prolonged state of anxiety may lead to sleeping troubles, which over time results in an increase in exhaustion. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were collected from 440 Polish healthcare providers, including nurses and midwives, doctors, paramedics, medical assistance workers, and wardens. Three measures were used: the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (the sleeping trouble subscale) and the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (the exhaustion subscale). Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. RESULTS: The obtained results fully support the hypotheses. Both the direct and indirect relationships between coronavirus anxiety and exhaustion were observed. Specifically, high coronavirus anxiety increased insomnia, which in turn contributed to the development of exhaustion. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with the COR theory. Prolonged coronavirus anxiety and sleeping problems depleted healthcare providers' resources and made them feel exhausted. Exhaustion among these workers can have serious consequences not only for themselves but also for the health of their patients. Therefore, research into effective ways to deal with coronavirus anxiety is needed. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2021;34(2):263-73.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions/physiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Burnout, Professional/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Zhongguo Zhen Jiu ; 41(3): 243-6, 2021 Mar 12.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168196

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical therapeutic effect on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with insomnia between the combined treatment of baduanjin and auricular point sticking therapy and the medication with oral estazolam on the base of the conventional treatment. METHODS: A total of 90 patients with COVID-19 accompanied with insomnia were randomly divided into an observation group (45 cases, 3 cases dropped off) and a control group (45 cases). In the observation group, baduanjin, a traditional Chinese fitness activity, was practiced everyday. Besides, auricular point sticking therapy was exerted at ear-shenmen (TF 4), subcortex (AT 4), heart (CO 15), occiput (AT 3), etc. These auricular points were pressed and kneaded three times a day, 30 s at each point each time, consecutively for 12 days. In the control group, estazolam tablets were prescribed for oral administration, 1 mg, once daily, consecutively for 12 days. Before and after treatment, the score of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), the score of self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), the score of self-rating depression scale (SDS) and the score of symptoms in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) were observed in the two groups and the clinical therapeutic effect was evaluated. RESULTS: After treatment, the scores of every item and the total scores in PSQI were all reduced as compared with those before treatment in the two groups (P<0.01). The scores of sleep time and sleep efficiency in the observation group were lower than those in the control group after treatment (P<0.05). SAS scores and SDS scores in the observation group and SAS score in the control group after treatment were all reduced as compared with those before treatment (P<0.01), and SDS score in the observation group was lower than that in the control group (P<0.01). After treatment, in the observation group, the score of each of the symptoms of TCM, i.e. unsound sleep, irritability and hot temper, profuse sputum and sticky feeling in the mouth, bitter taste in the mouth and foul breath, abdominal distention and poor appetite, as well as lassitude was reduced as compared with that before treatment successively (P<0.01), and the scores aforementioned (excepted for the unsound sleep) in the observation group were all lower than the control group (P<0.05). The total effective rates were 83.3% (35/42) in the observation group and 84.4% (38/45) in the control group, without statistical difference in comparison (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: The combined treatment of baduanjin and auricular point sticking therapy improves sleep quality, the conditions of anxiety and depression and the symptoms in TCM for patients of COVID-19 with insomnia. The therapeutic effect of this combined treatment is better than the oral administration of estazolam.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy , COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Acupuncture Points , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/drug therapy , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Treatment Outcome
17.
Sleep Breath ; 25(4): 2213-2219, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) caused great psychological distress often with comorbid insomnia. Insomnia is common in patients with COVID-19 admitted to mobile cabin hospitals. Insomnia may lead to immune dysfunction, a condition not conducive to recovery from COVID-19. The use of sedative-hypnotic drugs is limited by their inhibitory effect on the respiratory system. A paucity of research is available regarding psychotherapy interventions to improve insomnia symptoms among  patients with COVID-19. In the general population, sleep problems are more common in women than in men; insomnia in women patients requires special attention. The aim of this study was to develop simplified-cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (S-CBTI) for patients with COVID-19 and comorbid insomnia symptoms and to verify its effectiveness through a self-control trial. A second aim was to compare the effectiveness of S-CBTI between acute and chronic insomnia among women with COVID-19 and comorbid insomnia symptoms in Wuhan Jianghan Cabin Hospital. METHODS: S-CBTI consisted of education on COVID-19 and sleep hygiene, stimulus control, sleep restriction, and self-suggestion relaxation training over a period of two consecutive weeks. Of 67 women, 66 completed psychological intervention and baseline and post-intervention assessments. There were 31 women with acute insomnia and 35 with chronic insomnia. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) score and self-compiled sleep data were assessed at baseline and post-intervention, and subjective sleep evaluations were assessed at days 4, 7, 12, and 14. RESULTS: The ISI score, sleep latency, night sleep time, and sleep efficiency were statistically significantlly improved from baseline to post-intervention by paired T-test. After the intervention, the mean ISI score of the acute insomnia group was lower than that of the chronic insomnia group. The reduction of the ISI score and the improvement of sleep time from baseline to post-intervention in the acute insomnia group were greater than those in the chronic insomnia group. Utilization of sedative-hypnotic drugs in the acute insomnia group was less than that in the chronic insomnia group, and the difference was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: S-CBTI can improve the insomnia symptoms of women with COVID-19 in mobile cabin hospitals, especially for stress-related acute insomnia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Acute Disease , Adolescent , Adult , China , Chronic Disease , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Mobile Health Units , Patient Education as Topic , Relaxation Therapy , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
18.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 37(4): 755-761, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076946

ABSTRACT

Respiratory complications from COVID-19 can lead to death. For this reason, public health measures to curb the spread of the disease such as quarantine and other confinement strategies have been proposed in several countries, resulting in mental health and sleep disorders. We carried out a narrative review to systematize the most significant findings regarding insomnia in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, and in healthy persons who have been under confinement as a preventive measure. COVID-19-related conditions have caused insomnia in patients, which can alter the immune system and have a negative effect on health. For healthy people in quarantine, lifestyle changes, fear of becoming infected, young age, female gender, history of mental illness and reduced ability to cope with stress appear to be risk factors for insomnia. As well as the implementation of epidemiological and preventive measures, sleep hygiene should be promoted as a comprehensive coping strategy against the COVID-19 pandemic.


Las complicaciones respiratorias por la COVID-19 pueden llevar a la muerte, por lo que, dentro de las políticas de protección para evitar los contagios masivos, se han sugerido estrategias de cuarentena y confinamiento en muchos países, que han originado alteraciones en la salud mental y el sueño. A través de la siguiente revisión narrativa se pretende sistematizar los hallazgos más significativos en cuanto a la presencia de insomnio en pacientes hospitalizados con COVID-19, y de personas sanas que han estado sometidas a confinamiento como medida preventiva. Las condiciones propias de la enfermedad han hecho que los pacientes desarrollen insomnio, lo que puede empeorar su estado de salud y alterar su sistema inmunológico. Para las personas sanas en cuarentena los cambios en el estilo de vida, el miedo a contraer la enfermedad, la edad joven, el sexo femenino, los antecedentes de enfermedades mentales y una menor capacidad de afrontamiento al estrés parecen ser factores de riesgo para el insomnio. Al igual que la implementación de medidas epidemiológicas de cuidado y prevención contra el COVID-19, se debe tener en consideración promover la higiene del sueño como una estrategia de afrontamiento integral contra esta pandemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Age Factors , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Mental Disorders/complications , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
20.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245864, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1042710

ABSTRACT

The worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) has been a concern during the COVID-19 pandemic, because most people worked in self-isolation for fear of infection. We aimed to clarify the impact of social restrictions imposed due to the COVID-19 pandemic on neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD patients and to identify risk factors associated with these symptoms. A cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted from April 22, 2020 to May 15, 2020. PD patients and their family members were asked to complete paper-based questionnaires about neuropsychiatric symptoms by mail. PD patients were evaluated for motor symptoms using MDS-UPDRS part 2 by telephone interview. A total of 71 responders (39 PD patients and 32 controls) completed the study. Although there was no difference in the age distribution, the rate of females was significantly lower in PD patients (35%) than controls (84%) (P < 0.001). Participants with clinical depression (PHQ-9 score ≥ 10) were more common in PD patients (39%) than controls (6%) (P = 0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an MDS-UPDRS part 2 score was correlated with the presence of clinical depression (PHQ-9 score ≥ 10) and clinical anxiety (GAD-7 score ≥ 7) (clinical depression: OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.04-1.66; P = 0.025; clinical anxiety: OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.07-1.72; P = 0.013). In the presence of social restrictions, more attention needs to be paid to the neuropsychiatric complications of PD patients, especially those with more severe motor symptoms.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/etiology , Parkinson Disease/complications , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Risk Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL