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1.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 384-390, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513255

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To measure the Saudi population's sleep quality during the lockdown of COVID-19. METHODS: An internet-based questionnaire that was performed during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Saudi population over 2 weeks from April 1 to April 15, 2020. We used the instant messaging application WhatsApp and Twitter to reach the targeted population. Saudi citizens and non-Saudi residents who can read and understand the questionnaire were recruited. Data were analyzed using Stata and SPSS. RESULTS: A total of 790 responses were included. The majority of participants were the Saudi population 735 (92.9%). The prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality were 54.4% and 55.5%, respectively. Saudi citizenship was associated with longer sleep duration (p=0.031). Female gender and being married were associated with worse global PSQI, sleep quality, sleep distribution, sleep latency, and daytime dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Saudi population had a high prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality. Routine monitoring of the psychological impact of life-threatening outbreaks and the adoption of effective early mental health actions should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Public Policy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Sleep Latency , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data
2.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 35(5): 257-263, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361815

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) epidemic is associated with impaired sleep quality in nurses for several reasons. The present study aimed to determine the effect of an online mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on improving the sleep quality of nurses working in the COVID-19 care units. In this randomized controlled clinical trial study, all nurses in the 2 COVID-19 patient care units were randomly assigned to the control and intervention groups. The MBSR program was implemented online for 7 weeks for the intervention group by a trainer. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was completed online by the participants in both groups before and after the intervention. The results of the data analysis indicated that the intervention improved the scores of subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep efficiency in the intervention group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in the scores of subjective sleep quality, daily performance, and the total index score in the posttest. Besides, there was a significant difference between the 2 groups in only 2 components of sleep latency and subjective sleep quality. The MBSR program can be an effective intervention to improve the sleep quality of nurses working in COVID-19 intensive care units who are at risk of sleep quality disorders in stressful situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet-Based Intervention , Mindfulness , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Program Evaluation , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Meditation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Latency
3.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S53-S59, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065054

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Explore the evolution of sleep during the SARS-CoV-2 quarantine period and define associated factors. METHODS: An online survey of patients in quarantine. Questions targeted the conditions of quarantine, sleep related behaviours and exposure to factors known to affect sleep and circadian rhythms (light exposure and sport). RESULTS: In all, 1777 participants were included: 77% women and 72% aged 25-54 years. Quarantine conditions were most frequently in couples with children (36%) and in a house with a garden (51%). Forty-seven percent of participants reported a decrease in sleep quality during quarantine. Factors associated with a reduction in sleep quality by logistic regression were sleep reduction (OR 15.52 P<0.001), going to bed later (OR 1.72 P<0.001), getting up earlier (2.18 P=0.01), an increase in sleep-wake irregularity (OR 2.29 P<0.001), reduced exposure to daylight (OR 1.46 P=0.01) and increased screen use in the evenings (OR 1.33 P=0.04). CONCLUSION: Sleep quality tended to reduce during quarantine and this was associated with changes in sleep behaviours and light exposure, especially in the evening. In order to optimise sleep during quarantine, regular sleep and wake times, at least 1hour exposure to daylight and a reduction of screen use in the evenings are suggested.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Health Surveys , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quarantine , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep , Social Isolation , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dyssomnias/drug therapy , Dyssomnias/epidemiology , Dyssomnias/etiology , Exercise , Family , Female , France/epidemiology , Habits , Housing , Humans , Light , Male , Middle Aged , Online Systems , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep/physiology , Sleep/radiation effects , Sleep Aids, Pharmaceutical , Sleep Deprivation , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/drug therapy , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/epidemiology , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology , Sleep Latency , Sleep Wake Disorders/drug therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Young Adult
4.
Sleep Med ; 78: 8-14, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967848

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have demonstrated that first-line nurses involved in the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) crisis may experience sleep disturbances. As breathing relaxation techniques can improve sleep quality, anxiety, and depression, the current study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of diaphragmatic breathing relaxation training (DBRT) for improving sleep quality among nurses in Wuhan, China during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: This study used a quasi-experimental (before and after) intervention strategy, with 151 first-line nurses from four wards in Leishenshan hospital. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) to evaluate the effectiveness of DBRT before and after the intervention. Data were examined using the Shapiro-Wilk test, Levene's test, and paired t-test. RESULTS: A total of 140 nurses completed the DBRT sessions. First-line nurses achieved significant reductions in global sleep quality (p < 0.01), subjective sleep quality (p < 0.001), sleep latency (p < 0.01), sleep duration (p < 0.001), sleep disturbances (p < 0.001), habitual sleep efficiency (p = 0.015), daytime dysfunction (p = 0.001), and anxiety (p = 0.001). There were no significant reductions in the use of sleeping medication (p = 0.134) and depression (p = 0.359). CONCLUSION: DBRT is a useful non-pharmacological treatment for improving sleep quality and reducing anxiety among first-line nurses involved in the COVID-19 outbreak. The study protocol was clinically registered by the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ChiCTR2000032743.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Relaxation Therapy/methods , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/therapy , Sleep Latency , Adult , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Female , Humans , Male , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Self Efficacy , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Med Sci Monit Basic Res ; 26: e924085, 2020 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-233955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to understand the changes in psychological factors and sleep status of front-line medical staff in the fight against COVID-19 and provide evidence of exercise interventions to relieve psychological stress and improve sleep status for medical staff. MATERIAL AND METHODS A survey study was conducted among 120 front-line medical staff in the fight against COVID-19, of which 60 medical staff worked at the designated hospital (experimental group) and 60 medical staff worked at the non-designated hospital (control group). The Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90), Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), and PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) were used to assess mental status. Sleep status was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). RESULTS SCL-90 scores of somatization, depression, anxiety, and terror were higher than normal in front-line medical staff at the designated hospital. The SAS (45.89±1.117), SDS (50.13±1.813), and PCL-C (50.13±1.813) scores in the experimental group were higher than the normal control group, and were significantly different from those in the control group on SDS and PCL-C scales (P<0.05). The total average PSQI of the experimental group was 16.07±3.761, indicating that the sleep quality was poor. Among them, participants with moderate insomnia reached 61.67%, and participants with severe insomnia reached 26.67%. CONCLUSIONS There are psychological symptoms and sleep symptoms in front-line medical staff who participate in the fight against COVID-19, and they affect each other. Hospitals should improve emergency management measures, strengthen psychological counseling for clinical front-line medical staff, strengthen exercise intervention, and improve their sleep quality and mental health.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dyssomnias/psychology , Exercise Therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sleep/physiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Counseling , Depression/epidemiology , Dyssomnias/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Sleep Latency/physiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
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