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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(12)2022 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884193

ABSTRACT

The aim of our study is to evaluate the correlation between the psychological status of patients recovered from SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) infection (long-COVID patients) and their inflammatory status. Three months after hospital discharge, ninety-three patients were recruited and categorized into two distinct populations: control and long-COVID (COrona VIrus Disease) group. Patients belonging to the control group presented with an entering diagnosis of cardiovascular, metabolic, or respiratory disease and a negative history of SARS-CoV-2 infection, whereas the long-COVID population presented with a severe SARS-CoV-2 infection treated in the sub-intensive Care Unit. Psychological evaluation was performed through the administration of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL90) and LDH (Lactate dehydrogenase), ferritin, CRPhs (C-high sensitivity Reactive Protein), NLR (Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio), PLR (Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio), and SII (systemic immune-inflammation index) were investigated. We highlighted that beyond the first three months after contagion, patients recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection are characterized by the persistence of a systemic inflammatory state and are at high risk for developing somatization, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. Interestingly, ferritin value was strongly correlated with sleep disorders (p < 0.05). Our study emphasizes how COVID-19 strategies for risk stratification, prognosis, and therapy management of patients should be implemented with a psychological follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/complications , Ferritins , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(12)2022 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884164

ABSTRACT

We investigated whether people with disabilities-cognition, vision, hearing, mobility, or at least one of these disabilities-report more COVID-19-related negative lifestyle changes than those without disabilities, and whether psychological distress (MHI-5) mediates the association between disabilities and negative lifestyle changes. Information about COVID-related lifestyle changes among people with disabilities is scarce. We analyzed population-based data from the 2020 FinSote survey carried out between September 2020 and February 2021 in Finland (n = 22,165, aged 20+). Logistic regressions were applied to investigate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions on negative lifestyle changes-sleeping problems or nightmares, daily exercise, vegetable consumption, and snacking. To test for a mediation effect of psychological distress, the Karlson-Holm-Breen method was used. People with all disability types reported increased sleeping problems or nightmares, and decreased vegetable consumption during the pandemic more frequently than those without. People with mobility and cognitive disabilities more frequently reported decreased daily exercise. People with cognitive disabilities more often reported increased snacking. Psychological distress mediated associations between disabilities and negative lifestyle changes, with the highest association between cognitive disabilities and increased sleeping problems or nightmares (B = 0.60), and the lowest between mobility disabilities and decreased daily exercise (B = 0.08). The results suggest that strategies to promote healthy lifestyles should consider people with disabilities. Alleviating their psychological distress during crisis situations could be one approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Psychological Distress , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Finland/epidemiology , Humans , Life Style , Mental Health , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
3.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(3)2022 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879543

ABSTRACT

Objective: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a major impact globally. While sleep problems have increased during the pandemic, their impact on specific populations is less well known. The objective of this study was to measure the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep and how it correlates with the feeling of isolation in individuals aged ≥ 50 years.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using data from the Survey of Health, Aging, and Retirement conducted between June and August 2020. A multivariate logistic regression model was performed to analyze the outcome "more or less trouble sleeping since the outbreak" and its main predictors.Results: The mean ± SD age of the participants was 71 ± 9 years. Since the outbreak, 29% reported a deterioration of their quality of sleep. Being male and older were found to be significant predictors of more sleep complaints (OR = 1.13; P = .004; CI, 1.04-1.23 and OR = 1.02; P = .000; CI, 1.02-1.03, respectively). Moreover, those who claimed that they often felt alone or more loneliness since the beginning of the outbreak also had more trouble sleeping (OR = 1.21; P = .002; CI, 1.07-1.37 and OR = 4.06; P = .000; CI, 2.75-5.99, respectively).Conclusions: Male sex, older age, and loneliness are associated with more sleeping difficulties since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings can aid health authorities to address sleep issues in this vulnerable population more directly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
5.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 129, 2022 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869106

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the accumulation of negative emotions brought by COVID-19-related dysfunctional beliefs, individuals adopted obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms (e.g., over-checking the wearing of masks) and formed difficulties in emotion regulation (DER). This study focused on the temporal dynamics of the bidirectional relation between OC symptoms and DER, which had a devastating effect on the individual's mental health. As an extension, we further explored whether OC and DER and their relationship affect sleep problems. METHODS: In February 2020, a 14-day (twice a day, of 28 measurement intervals) online questionnaire survey was conducted on 122 Chinese adults (aged 18-55 years; 63 females). Subsequently, this research applied a dynamic structural equation model with a cross-lagged relationship and a time series. Health anxiety, anxiety, and depression were controlled as covariates. RESULTS: Both OC symptoms and DER had a significant autoregressive and cross-lagged effect. Comparatively speaking, DER was a stronger predictor of OC symptoms than OC's prediction of DER. Moreover, both higher levels of OC symptoms and DER were related to the severity of sleep problems. CONCLUSIONS: More guidance on intervening in OC symptoms and identifying emotion regulation should be added to reduce the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotional Regulation , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/epidemiology , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Pandemics
6.
Sleep Med Rev ; 62: 101596, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867776

ABSTRACT

Our main aim was to examine the evidence of the effects of coronavirus disease confinement on the sleep of children aged 12 years and younger. A systematic review was conducted following the recommendations for Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. MEDLINE, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Excerpta Medica Database, Psychological Information Database, and Web Of Science were systematically searched between the period of January 2020 and March 2021. The quality assessment was analysed with the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale and the National Institutes of Health quality assessment tool for observational cohort and cross-sectional studies. The appraisal tool for cross-sectional studies was applied to cross-sectional studies and each longitudinal study was assessed with the critical appraisal skills programme. Data analysis was carried out through a narrative review. Eight studies were included in the review. Seven studies reported changes in sleep routines and five studies focused on sleep disturbances during confinement. The most important findings were a longer duration of sleep time, an increase in sleep latency, and daytime sleepiness. Whether or not the adverse changes to sleep patterns and bedtime routines seen during the home confinement period have any long-term consequences for children's sleep and daytime functioning remains unknown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Sleep , United States
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855585

ABSTRACT

Disruption in routine may be related to experiencing negative emotional states and to aggressive behaviors in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The lockdown because of COVID-19 contributed to the disruption of individuals' routines, including the sleep-wake cycle. The current study tested a relationship between the adherence to the sleep-wake routine and aggressive behaviors via the mediation role of negative emotional states (i.e., anxiety and anger). Forty-three parents of adults with ASD completed a web-based questionnaire about their life condition during the first lockdown (April-May 2020). Preliminary analyses showed a worsening in the adults' aggressive behaviors during the lockdown in comparison to before it (Z = -3.130; p = 0.002). In the mediation models, the relationship between the adherence to the sleep-wake routines and aggressive behaviors was significant. The models showed the hypothesized mediated relationships among the adherence to the sleep-wake routines, negative emotional states, and aggressive behaviors (Model 1: F (1, 41) = 10.478, p < 0.001; Model 2: F(1, 41) = 9.826, p = 0.003). The findings confirmed the potential protective role of the adherence to the sleep-wake routines for the emotional and behavioral adjustment of adults with autism. Theoretical and practical contributions of the study were discussed; indeed, our results may inform parent-coaching as well as intervention programs for individuals with ASD given that adequate sleep hygiene may contribute to improvements in internalizing/externalizing behaviors.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
8.
J Int Med Res ; 50(5): 3000605221097478, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832986

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Emergency psychological interventions are needed in patients with COVID-19. During the pandemic, psychological counseling services have been provided using online platforms to address adverse psychological impacts and symptoms in patients and the general population. We investigated the effects of telepsychotherapy on emotional well-being and psychological distress in patients affected by COVID-19. METHODS: Forty-five Sicilian patients who had contracted COVID-19 joined "Telecovid Sicilia" from March to June 2020. Participants completed self-assessment questionnaires and psychological testing to measure levels of anxiety, presence of depressive symptoms, and altered circadian rhythm with consequent sleep disorders and psychological distress. Individual telepsychotherapy services were provided for 1 hour, twice a week, for 16 sessions in total. RESULTS: We enrolled 45 patients (42.2% women). We found significant changes between baseline and the end of follow-up in all outcome measures, especially depression (χ2 (1) = 30.1; effect size [ES] = 0.82), anxiety (χ2 (1) = 37.4; ES = 0.91), and paranoid ideation (χ2 (1) = 5.6; ES = 0.35). The proportion of participants with sleep disorders decreased to 84.1% after intervention (χ2 (1) = 58.6; ES = 1.14). CONCLUSION: A telepsychotherapeutic approach showed promising effects on psychological symptoms, with significantly reduced patient anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Telemedicine , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Psychotherapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
9.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 18(5): 1413-1418, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818601

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleep disturbance is common in long-COVID (LC). Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is characterized by sleep disturbance and has been reported after viral infections. Therefore, we evaluated RLS symptoms cross-sectionally in individuals with LC at both current and pre-coronavirus disease 2019 (pre-COVID-19) time points. METHODS: Adults on LC-focused Facebook pages were recruited for an online assessment of symptoms before COVID-19 infection and during their present LC state in a cross-sectional manner. The LC group documented baseline symptoms retrospectively. Questions were included about the presence/severity of RLS symptoms and assessments of fatigue, quality of life, and sleep apnea. A control group was recruited and included individuals ≥ 18 years of age who never had overt symptoms of COVID-19. Pregnancy was an exclusion criterion for both groups. RESULTS: There were 136 participants with LC (89.7% females, age 46.9 ± 12.9 years) and 136 controls (65.4% females, age 49.2 ± 15.5). RLS prevalence in females with LC was 5.7% pre-COVID-19 and 14.8% post-COVID-19 (P < .01) vs 6.7% in control females. Severity of RLS was moderate in both groups. Logistic regression predicting post-COVID-19 RLS among females with LC failed to find significant effects of hospitalization, sleep apnea, neuropathic pain severity, or use of antihistamines and antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The baseline prevalence of RLS in females with LC was similar to the general population group as well as to patients in epidemiological studies. The prevalence significantly increased in the LC state. Postinfectious immunological mechanisms may be at play in the production for RLS symptoms. CITATION: Weinstock LB, Brook JB, Walters AS, Goris A, Afrin LB, Molderings GJ. Restless legs syndrome is associated with long-COVID in women. J Clin Sleep Med. 2022;18(5):1413-1418.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Restless Legs Syndrome , Sleep Apnea Syndromes , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Quality of Life , Restless Legs Syndrome/complications , Restless Legs Syndrome/diagnosis , Restless Legs Syndrome/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
10.
Front Public Health ; 10: 828650, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818024

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been linked to a rise in loneliness. Loneliness is associated with sleep-related problems, which in turn can be a risk factor for various psychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear whether loneliness is linked to sleep-related problems during the pandemic. Here, we studied the association between loneliness and sleep-related problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. Methods: A total of 33,302 individuals who indicated they were employed were surveyed online. The survey responses of 27,036 participants were analyzed. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results: Of those analyzed, 2,750 (10.2%) experienced feelings of loneliness. Further, sleep-related problems were significantly more common among those who felt lonely both in the short term (more than 3 days) and the long term (more than 3 months). The ORs were much weaker after adjusting for factors related to interpersonal connections, such as family and friendships, than after adjusting for factors related to socioeconomic status. Conclusion: Loneliness may be a risk factor for sleep-related problems in the COVID-19 pandemic. Having connections with family and friends may have a moderating effect on the occurrence of sleep-related problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Loneliness/psychology , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
11.
Braz Oral Res ; 36: e046, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808654

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep quality and possible sleep bruxism (SB) in children eight to ten years of age. The study hypothesis was that sleep disturbances influenced a higher occurrence of bruxism during the COVID-19 pandemic. A longitudinal study was conducted at two time points: in person prior to the COVID-19 pandemic (T1), and online during the pandemic (T2). The sample comprised 105 children. Parents/caregivers answered a questionnaire addressing sociodemographic characteristics, the use of electronic devices, reported (vs. clinical) SB, and the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) at both T1 and T2. McNemar's and Wilcoxon's tests were used to compare SB and sleep disorders at both time points. Poisson regression analysis determined the relative risk (RR) among the variables, and the incidence of possible SB (p≤0.05). The comparison of the two time points (T1 and T2) revealed a significant increase in possible SB (p<0.01) and sleep disorders (p < 0.04). Children whose parents had a lower schooling level (RR: 2.67; 95%CI: 1.19-6.01), those with their own electronic devices (RR: 1.97; 95%CI: 1.09-2.50), and those with sleep disorders during the pandemic (RR: 1.74; 95%CI: 1.35-2.24) were at greater risk of developing SB during the pandemic. Moreover, the incidence of bruxism and sleep disorders was greater during the pandemic. The factors influencing SB incidence during the pandemic were a lower level of mothers' schooling, greater access to electronic devices, and the occurrence of sleep disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Bruxism , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Sleep Bruxism/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
12.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e055792, 2022 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807407

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 related measures have impacted sleep on a global level. We examine changes in sleep problems and duration focusing on gender differentials. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses using two nationally representative surveys collected during the first and second month after the 2020 lockdown in the UK. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants (age 17 years and above) from the first wave of the Understanding Society COVID-19 Study are linked to the most recent wave before the pandemic completed during 2018 and 2019 (n=14 073). COVID-19 Survey Data was collected from 2 to 31 May 2020 (n=8547) with participants drawn from five nationally representative cohort studies in the UK. ANALYSIS: We conducted bivariate analyses to examine gender gaps in change in sleep problems and change in sleep duration overall and by other predictors. A series of multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models were estimated to explore predictors of change in sleep problems and change in sleep time. RESULTS: People in the UK on average experienced an increase in sleep loss during the first 4 weeks of the lockdown (mean=0.13, SD=0.9). Women report more sleep loss than men (coefficient=0.15, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.19). Daily sleep duration on average increased by ten minutes (mean=-0.16, SD=1.11), with men gaining eight more minutes of sleep per day than women (coefficient=0.13, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.17). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 related measures amplified traditional gender roles. Men's sleep was more affected by changes in their financial situation and employment status related to the crisis, with women more influenced by their emotional reaction to the pandemic, feeling anxious and spending more time on family duties such as home schooling, unpaid domestic duties, nurturing and caregiving. Based on our findings, we provide policy advice of early, clear and better employment protection coverage of self-employed and precarious workers and employer recognition for parents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Sex Factors , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
Ital J Pediatr ; 48(1): 60, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1799097

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased incidence of central precocious puberty (CPP) after coronavirus infectious disease-19 lockdown has been reported. Our study aims in investigating changes in CPP rates and in sleep patterns in CPP and healthy controls. METHODS: CPP were retrospectively evaluated from April 2020 to April 2021. Parents of girls diagnosed with CPP during lockdown and of matched healthy controls filled out a questionnaire about sleep disturbances (SDSC questionnaire) and sleep schedules. RESULTS: Thirty-five CPP and 37 controls completed the survey. Incidence of new CPP cases significantly increased in 2020-2021 compared to 2017-2020 (5:100 vs 2:100, p = 0.02). Sleep disturbance rates did not differ between CPP and healthy controls before lockdown. During lockdown, CPP reported higher rates of sleep disturbs for total score (p = 0.005), excessive somnolence (p = 0.049), sleep breathing disorders (p = 0.049), and sleep-wake transition disorders (p = 0.005). Moreover, CPP group more frequently shifted toward later bedtime (p = 0.03) during lockdown compared to controls. Hours of sleep and smartphone exposure around bedtime did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms the observation of increased incidence of CPP after lockdown measures. Additionally, CPP showed higher rates of sleep disturbances and later bedtime compared to controls. The causality link between sleep disturbances and CPP should be further investigated to gain knowledge in this association.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Puberty, Precocious , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Puberty, Precocious/epidemiology , Puberty, Precocious/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
14.
Vertex ; XXXIII(155): 13-24, 2022 Mar.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791217

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Melatonin is a safe medication with multiple uses in sleep medicine for the treatment of circadian rhythm disorders, insomnia, and REM sleep behavior disorder. In view that melatonin has been recommended as an adjuvant treatment in COVID-19 pandemic mainly due to its anti-inflammatory properties, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the history of COVID-19 infection and the requirement of hospitalization in a group of adult patients previously treated with melatonin for various sleep disorders. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of data from a closed population of 110 adult patients at a University Hospital treated with melatonin for various sleep disorders, analyzed until the onset of COVID-19 pandemic. Demographic and melatonin-related variables (dose, treatment time) were analyzed and were reevaluated during the pandemic period, by scheduled tele-consultation regarding diagnosis, hospitalization requirements, variables related to COVID-19 infection prior to specific vaccination. Categorical variables were described as relative and absolute frequencies. RESULTS: N = 110 patients. Age range = 40- 96 years (mean = 71 years ± 9.9), older adults > 65 years: N =87 (79,1%). COVID-19 infection was recorded in 15 patients (13.5%) requiring hospitalization in 5 of those infected, only one of them with severe pneumonia. There were no deaths due to COVID-19. There were no differences between infected vs. uninfected in age (p = 0.74), body mass index (p = 0.65) or melatonin dose (p = 0.10).The melatonin dose range was 3-150 mg / day (mean = 46.33 ± 34.1), older adults receiving a mean dose of 50,3 ± 35,6.The 75.5% of the patients were treated for at least 12 months with melatonin. CONCLUSION: We found that 13.5% of patients previously treated with melatonin for various sleep disorders were infected by COVID-19, requiring hospitalization with subsequent medical discharge one third of them. According to national records the lethality rate in older adults in August 2020 was 10.5%. No patient treated with melatonin died for this cause in this sample. We did not find statistically significant differences in terms of indicated melatonin dose, age or body mass index, when comparing those infected with those not infected. The patients in general were mostly older adults, treated with a mean dose greater than 40 mg / day of melatonin for various sleep disorders, mainly for complaints of insomnia, for more than 12 months. The results are consistent with a possible preventive effect of melatonin in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Melatonin , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Melatonin/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/drug therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/drug therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
15.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 87, 2022 Apr 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The sudden outbreak of COVID-19 had a great impact on the physical and mental health of people all over the world, especially for students whose physical and mental development was not yet mature. In order to understand the physical and mental conditions of students during the epidemic period and provide a theoretical basis for coping with psychological problems in public health emergencies, this study explored the mediating role of sleep disorders in the effect of the psychological stress response (PSR) on non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), along with the moderating role of emotional management ability (EMA). METHODS: The SRQ-20, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, NSSI Behavior Questionnaire, and Emotional Management Questionnaire were used to investigate the mental health of Chinese students in April 10-20 (Time point 1, T1) and May 20-30 (Time point 2, T2), 2020. A total of 1,955 students (Mage = 19.64 years, 51.4% male) were examined at T1 and 342 students (Mage = 20.06 years, 48.2% male) were reassessed at T2. RESULTS: Overall, the detection rate of PSR and NSSI were 17.60% (n = 344) and 24.90% (n = 486) respectively in the T1 sample, and were 16.37% (n = 56) and 25.44% (n = 87), in the T2 sample. We also found that sleep disorders played a mediating role in the effect of PSR on NSSI in the T1 and T2 samples. In addition, EMA was shown to regulate the effect of PSR on sleep disorders and the effect of sleep disorders on NSSI in the T1 samples. CONCLUSION: We found that PSR resulting from public health emergency might lead to NSSI behaviors in individuals. PSR may also cause sleep disorders, which can bring about NSSI. However, these effects were also moderated by the EMA. This research expands our understanding of PSR and NSSI in students during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Self-Injurious Behavior , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Self-Injurious Behavior/epidemiology , Self-Injurious Behavior/etiology , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students/psychology
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e056044, 2022 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774962

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the sleep problems among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: English, peer-reviewed, observational studies published between December 2019 and July 2021 which assessed and reported sleep problem prevalence using a valid and reliable measure were included. INFORMATION SOURCES: Scopus, Medline/PubMed Central, ProQuest, ISI Web of Knowledge and Embase. RISK OF BIAS ASSESSMENT TOOL: The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale checklist. SYNTHESIS OF RESULTS: Prevalence of sleep problems was synthesised using STATA software V.14 using a random effects model. To assess moderator analysis, meta-regression was carried out. Funnel plot and Egger's test were used to assess publication bias. Meta-trim was used to correct probable publication bias. The jackknife method was used for sensitivity analysis. INCLUDED STUDIES: A total of seven cross-sectional studies with 2808 participants from four countries were included. SYNTHESIS OF RESULTS: The pooled estimated prevalence of sleep problems was 56% (95% CI 23% to 88%, I2=99.81%, Tau2=0.19). Due to the probability of publication bias, the fill-and-trim method was used to correct the estimated pooled measure, which imputed four studies. The corrected results based on this method showed that pooled prevalence of sleep problems was 13% (95% CI 0% to 45%; p<0.001). Based on meta-regression, age was the only significant predictor of prevalence of sleep problems among pregnant women. LIMITATIONS OF EVIDENCE: All studies were cross-sectional absence of assessment of sleep problems prior to COVID-19, and the outcomes of the pregnancies among those with and without sleep problems in a consistent manner are among the limitation of the current review. INTERPRETATION: Pregnant women have experienced significant declines in sleep quality when faced with the COVID-19 pandemic. The short-term and long-term implications of such alterations in sleep on gestational and offspring outcomes are unclear and warrant further studies. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020181644.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prevalence , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
17.
Health Psychol ; 41(4): 243-245, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768786

ABSTRACT

Psychological resilience represents an important construct for physical and behavioral health. This article introduces a special section on resilience as it relates to health psychology. In this special section, resilience in the context of cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, sleep disorders, and cancers are studied. This special section is part of an American Psychological Association (APA) interdivisional journal series on resilience. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Behavioral Medicine , Cardiovascular Diseases , Resilience, Psychological , Sleep Wake Disorders , Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology , Humans
18.
Psychiatry Res ; 312: 114533, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763941

ABSTRACT

It is well recognised that there is an intimate relationship between sleep and depression, with poor quality or short duration sleep associated with greater symptoms of depression. However, it is not clear from the current evidence base what the temporal relationship is between symptoms of insomnia and depression. Further, it is also unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic may impact on such relationships. In this study we have examined the longitudinal relationships between symptoms of depression and insomnia during the COVID-19 pandemic at two points separated by one year (April/May 2020 and March/April 2021) in a sample of 1032 Irish adults using a cross-lagged paths model. We report that there is a bidirectional relationship across time between depression and insomnia symptoms (ß = -0.115 between Insomnia symptoms and subsequent depression symptoms and ß = -0.163 between depression symptoms and subsequent insomnia symptoms; scales scored in opposite directions), and that these relationships persist when COVID-19 anxiety, age and sex are introduced into the model. Our analyses suggest that during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic that insomnia symptoms predicted depression symptoms one year later, and conversely that depression symptoms predicted subsequent insomnia symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
19.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(5): 620-630, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758608

ABSTRACT

Background: Sex differences have been demonstrated in the acute phase of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Women (F) were found to be less prone to develop a severe disease than men (M), but few studies have assessed sex-differences in Long-COVID-19 syndrome. Methods: The aim of this prospective/retrospective study was to characterize the long-term consequences of this infection based on sex. For this purpose, we enrolled 223 patients (89 F and 134 M) who were infected by SARS-CoV-2. In the acute phase of the illness, F reported the following symptoms more frequently than M: weakness, dysgeusia, anosmia, thoracic pain, palpitations, diarrhea, and myalgia-all without significant differences in breathlessness, cough, and sleep disturbance. Results: After a mean follow-up time of 5 months after the acute phase, F were significantly more likely than M to report dyspnea, weakness, thoracic pain, palpitations, and sleep disturbance but not myalgia and cough. At the multivariate logistic regression, women were statistically significantly likely to experience persistent symptoms such as dyspnea, fatigue, chest pain, and palpitations. On the contrary, myalgia, cough, and sleep disturbance were not influenced by sex. Conclusion: We demonstrated that F were more symptomatic than M not only in the acute phase but also at follow-up. Sex was found to be an important determinant of Long-COVID-19 syndrome because it is a significant predictor of persistent symptoms in F, such as dyspnea, fatigue, chest pain, and palpitations. Our results suggest the need for long-term follow-up of these patients from a sex perspective to implement early preventive and personalized therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chest Pain/etiology , Cough/complications , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue , Female , Humans , Male , Myalgia/complications , Myalgia/etiology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Characteristics , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Syndrome
20.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 61: 103774, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Covid-19 pandemic caused relevant psychological consequences in the general population. Since people with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) are usually at higher risk of psychological distress than age-matched healthy controls (HC), a meta-analytic study was conducted, aimed at evaluating i) differences between pwMS and HC in the psychological variables during the pandemic, ii) differences in the levels of anxiety, depression, stress, sleep disturbances and quality of life before and during the Covid-19 pandemic in pwMS. METHODS: The literature search on three electronic databases yielded 196 studies (113 after the duplicates removal). Seven studies compared psychological variables between pwMS and HC during the pandemic, while seven studies evaluated the pre- vs during the pandemic differences in pwMS. The following outcomes were selected: depression, anxiety, physical QoL, mental QoL, stress, sleep quality/disturbances. Mean weighted effect sizes (ES) were calculated using Hedges'g, via Prometa3 software. RESULTS: During the pandemic, pwMS showed higher levels of depression (g = 0.51, p=.001), anxiety (g = 0.41, p=.032), and stress (g = 0.51, p=.016) compared to HC. The comparison on psychological outcomes before and during the pandemic in pwMS revealed no significant increase during the pandemic on levels of anxiety (g = 0.08, p=.380), depression (g = 0.02, p=.772), mental QoL (g= -0.14, p=.060), physical QoL (g = 0.00, p=.986), whereas sleep quality deteriorated during the pandemic (g = 0.52, p<.001). CONCLUSIONS: In agreement with pre-pandemic literature, pwMS showed higher levels of psychological distress than HC also during the Covid-19 pandemic. Contrariwise, longitudinal studies revealed that, in pwMS, the only psychological-associated variable that worsened significantly was the sleep quality, but this outcome was evaluated only in two studies. Future studies will have to assess/evaluate the long-term psychological consequences of the pandemic on pwMS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
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