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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1006610, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142341

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Medical workers are prone to psychological and sleep disturbances during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Little is known about the varying degrees of influence among vaccinated medical staff working in different positions. The current study is aimed to evaluate and compare depression, anxiety and sleep disturbances among first-line, second-line and at home vaccinated medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic in Shanghai, China. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in May 2022. In addition to demographic data, levels of depression, anxiety, sleep quality, and insomnia were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS). Results: A total of 236 vaccinated medical workers completed the questionnaires, including 85 first-line medical staff (FMS), 82 second-line medical staff (SMS) and 69 at home medical staff (HMS). The proportions of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, poor sleep quality, and insomnia were 52.1, 44.1, 55.9, and 49.2%, respectively. Compared with HMS, medical staff at work (FMS and SMS) got significantly higher frequency of poor sleep quality (both p < 0.001), insomnia (both p < 0.001), depressive (p < 0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively) and anxiety symptoms (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Compared with SMS, FMS were more likely to have poor sleep quality (p = 0.020). Besides, nurses got significantly higher percentage of poor sleep quality (OR = 1.352, p = 0.016) and insomnia (OR = 1.243, p = 0.041) than doctors. Whereas, the proportion of anxiety symptoms was increased in females than in males (OR = 2.772, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Psychological and sleep disturbances are common among medical staff at work during the COVID-19 pandemic. More psychological intervention should be administrated for FMS, especially for nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Female , Male , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , China/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Medical Staff , Sleep Quality
2.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 20412, 2022 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133626

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and lockdowns worldwide forced children and adolescents to change and adapt their lives to an unprecedented situation. Using an online survey, we investigated whether they showed changes in sleep quality and other related factors due to this event. Between February 21st, 2021 and April 19th, 2021, a total of 2,290 Austrian children and adolescents (6-18 years) reported their sleep habits and quality of sleep as well as physical activity, daylight exposure and usage of media devices during and, retrospectively, before the pandemic. Results showed an overall delay of sleep and wake times. Almost twice as many respondents reported having sleeping problems during the pandemic as compared to before, with insomnia, nightmares and daytime sleepiness being the most prevalent problems. Furthermore, sleeping problems and poor quality of sleep correlated positively with COVID-19 related anxiety. Lastly, results showed a change from regular to irregular bedtimes during COVID-19, higher napping rates, a strong to very strong decrease in physical activity and daylight exposure, as well as a high to very high increase in media consumption. We conclude that the increase in sleeping problems in children and adolescent during COVID-19 is concerning. Thus, health promoting measures and programs should be implemented and enforced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Self Report , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep
3.
BMC Neurol ; 22(1): 417, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117395

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Long-onset COVID syndrome has been described in patients with COVID-19 infection with persistence of symptoms or development of sequelae beyond 4 weeks after the onset of acute symptoms, a medium- and long-term consequence of COVID-19. This syndrome can affect up to 32% of affected individuals, with symptoms of fatigue, dyspnea, chest pain, cognitive disorders, insomnia, and psychiatric disorders. The present study aimed to characterize and evaluate the prevalence of sleep symptoms in patients with long COVID syndrome. METHODOLOGY: A total of 207 patients with post-COVID symptoms were evaluated through clinical evaluation with a neurologist and specific exams in the subgroup complaining of excessive sleepiness. RESULTS: Among 189 patients included in the long COVID sample, 48 (25.3%) had sleep-related symptoms. Insomnia was reported by 42 patients (22.2%), and excessive sleepiness (ES) was reported by 6 patients (3.17%). Four patients with ES were evaluated with polysomnography and test, multiple sleep latencies test, and actigraphic data. Two patients had a diagnosis of central hypersomnia, and one had narcolepsy. A history of steroid use was related to sleep complaints (insomnia and excessive sleepiness), whereas depression was related to excessive sleepiness. We observed a high prevalence of cognitive complaints in these patients. CONCLUSION: Complaints related to sleep, such as insomnia and excessive sleepiness, seem to be part of the clinical post-acute syndrome (long COVID syndrome), composing part of its clinical spectrum, relating to some clinical data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Sleepiness , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/diagnosis , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Syndrome
4.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276834, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117962

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Gain insight into the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors of mental health problems among the Dutch general population and different age groups in November-December 2020, compared with the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors in the same period in 2018 and 2019. More specifically, the prevalence, incidence, and risk factors of anxiety and depression symptoms, sleep problems, fatigue, impaired functioning due to health problems, and use of medicines for sleep problems, medicines for anxiety and depression, and mental health service. METHODS: We extracted data from the Longitudinal Internet studies for the Social Sciences (LISS) panel that is based on a probability sample of the Dutch population of 16 years and older by Statistics Netherlands. We focused on three waves of the longitudinal Health module in November-December 2018 (T1), November-December 2019 (T2), and November-December 2020 (T3), and selected respondents who were 18 years and older at T1. In total, 4,064 respondents participated in all three surveys. Data were weighted using 16 demographics profiles of the Dutch adult population. The course of mental health problems was examined using generalized estimating equations (GEE) for longitudinal ordinal data and differences in incidence with logistic regression analyses. In both types of analyses, we controlled for sex, age, marital status, employment status, education level, and physical disease. RESULTS: Among the total study sample, no significant increase in the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms, sleep problems, fatigue, impaired functioning due to health problems, use of medicines for sleep problems, of medicines for anxiety and depression, and of mental health service in November-December 2020 was observed, compared with the prevalence in November-December 2018 and 2019 (T3 did not differ from T1 and T2). Among the four different age categories (18-34, 35-49, 50-64, and 65 years old and older respondents), 50-64 years respondents had a significantly lower prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms at T3 than at T1 and T2, while the prevalence at T1 and T2 did not differ. A similar pattern among 65+ respondents was found for mental health service use. We found no indications that the incidence of examined health problems at T2 (no problems at T1, problems at T2) and T3 (no problems at T2, problems at T3) differed. Risk factors for mental health problems at T2 were mostly similar to risk factors at T3; sex and age were less/not a risk factor for sleep problems at T3 compared with at T2. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence, incidence, and risk factors of the examined mental health problems examined nine months after the COVID-19 outbreak appear to be very stable across the end of 2018, 2019, and 2020 among the Dutch adult population and different age categories, suggesting that the Dutch adult population in general is rather resilient given all disruptions due to this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Humans , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Pandemics , Prevalence , Mental Health , Incidence , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , Risk Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(37): e30637, 2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107666

ABSTRACT

To determine the prevalence of sleep disturbance during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic among US adults who are more vulnerable to complications because of age and co-morbid conditions, and to identify associated sociodemographic and psychosocial factors. Cross-sectional survey linked to 3 active clinical trials and 2 cohort studies, conducted between 11/30/2020 and 3/3/2021. Five academic internal medicine practices and 2 federally qualified health centers. A total of 715 adults ages 23 to 91 years living with one or more chronic conditions. A fifth (20%) of participants reported poor sleep. Black adults were twice as likely to report poor sleep compared to Whites. Self-reported poor physical function (51%), stress (42%), depression (28%), and anxiety (36%) were also common and all significantly associated with poor sleep. Age ≥70 years and having been vaccinated for COVID-19 were protective against poor sleep. Sex, education, income, alcohol use, and employment status were not significantly associated with sleep quality. In this diverse sample of adults with chronic conditions, by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, disparities in sleep health amid the ongoing pandemic were apparent. Worse physical function and mental health were associated with poor sleep and should be considered targets for health system interventions to prevent the many subsequent consequences of disturbed sleep on health outcomes. Measurements: self-reported sleep quality, physical function, stress, depression, and anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Young Adult
6.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 24(11): 635-643, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104097

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We reviewed current evidence on the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on sleep of different populations. RECENT FINDINGS: Several studies demonstrated that sleep deprivation may cause immune system dysregulation, which deteriorates the course of COVID-19. The increased prevalence of sleep disorders among COVID-19 patients has been associated with more severe disease and worse clinical outcomes. Healthcare workers who were subjected to atypical workload and more nightshifts developed sleep disorders which associated with work-related errors and COVID-19 infection susceptibility. In general population, circadian misalignment and excessive stressors impaired sleep quality. Sleep dysfunction has been recorded due to the pandemic. It is essential to implement interventions in order to alleviate pandemic-related sleep disorders. Telemedicine, cognitive behavioral therapy, and sleep hygiene practices appear to be helpful. Psychotropic medication should be cautiously administered, while other pharmacological agents, such as melatonin, have shown promising results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099505

ABSTRACT

Mandatory home isolation caused by COVID-19 in professional contexts led to a situation that required work activities to be converted into a remote modality. The literature on this topic is very recent, given the pandemic and the uncertainty of virtual and face-to-face work modalities. This study aimed to examine the effects of adults' prolonged exposure to screens on sleep quality, the type of devices used according to age and gender, periods of access to such devices and the impact on performance in the context of telework due to COVID-19. Specifically, the study analyzed the differences in the use of devices and in the time spent using them during and after teleworking between genders and age groups. A total of 127 Portuguese participants answered the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and a questionnaire that we specifically developed to characterize teleworking habits. The results showed differences between men and women regarding the use of devices and its impact on sleep quality, as well as differences in terms of age. These results are discussed in terms of how the current work context may affect performance, sleep, gender differences and the adverse effects of exposure to screens during and after work hours.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Teleworking , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
8.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 527-535, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adolescents' anxiety and depression during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak cannot be ignored. In public health crisis events, adolescents are prone to negative psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression. Hence, this research focuses on the use of reasonable and efficient methods to intervene in adolescents' psychological problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: From February to April 2020, we conducted an anonymous online survey on a total of 1,200 adolescents in the provinces of Hunan and Guangxi in China. Moreover, we randomly divided a total of 150 middle school students with anxiety scores greater than 50 and volunteered to participate in the intervention experiment into control and intervention groups, with 75 members in each group. On the basis of the proposed routine treatment, we conducted 8 weeks of model 328-based peer education intervention in the intervention group. RESULTS: After the intervention, the self-rating anxiety scale scores (SAS) of the intervention group are better than those of the control group (P<0.001). Moreover, the self-rating depression scale (SDS) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group (P<0.001) than on the control group. Finally, the total Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group than on the control group (P=0.001 and <0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Model 328-based peer education intervention can significantly reduce the level of anxiety and depression in adolescents and improve their sleep quality.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , China , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sleep is a complex, reversible process that is responsible for the modulation of various physiological mechanisms. COVID-19-related sleep disorders are affecting different populations with a heterogenous prevalence, yet high rates among infected patients are frequently reported. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of insomnia in the early post-COVID-19 recovery period and explore the differences in the results acquired by the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) by gender and selected infection severity parameters. METHODS: The data presented in the paper come from a prospective, observational study on COVID-19 complications (SILCOV-19) consisting of 200 COVID-19 patients. The AIS was used for the quantitative measurement of insomnia symptoms based on ICD-10 criteria. RESULTS: 32% (n = 64) of all patients in the study group obtained results indicating sleep disturbances (>5 points on the scale), while 21.5% (n = 43) obtained results indicating insomnia (>10 points on the scale). The analysis of the results obtained by all patients in the AIS showed a significant correlation with the duration of symptoms (Spearman's rank-order: R = 0.18; p < 0.05), but not with the number of days spent in the hospital or age. Women achieved a higher score in overall AIS, as well as in questions assessing total sleep time, well-being the next day, physical and mental fitness the next day, and sleepiness during the day (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of insomnia in the early post-COVID-19 recovery period is high.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Female , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
10.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276165, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089421

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed unique academic, social, financial, and health-related challenges for young adults. While numerous studies have documented average increases in reported mental health issues in the general population, few have measured the magnitude of changes in mental health symptoms and sleep difficulties within individuals. Here, we measure the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health and sleep of university students pre- and mid-pandemic. Prior to the pandemic (Fall 2019), individuals (n = 23) were recruited to participate in an eight-day, comprehensive sleep study using Fitbit® actigraphy. Participants also completed detailed mental health and sleep surveys, including depression (BDI-II), anxiety (STAI), and sleep disturbance (PROMIS) surveys. One year later, these individuals repeated the study during the pandemic (Fall 2020); participants completed the original surveys and sleep study, in addition to a targeted survey on mental and sleep health due to the pandemic. Self-reported levels of anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance, and sleep parameters, measured by actigraphy, were compared within the same individuals pre- and mid-pandemic. Self-report survey data revealed that three-quarters of participants experienced an increase in stress and anxiety due to the pandemic. In addition, intra-individual depression and anxiety symptoms increased to clinically significant levels within individuals from pre- to mid-pandemic. Over two-thirds of participants reported sleeping less, and more than half reported that their sleep health had worsened during the pandemic. Changes in sleep disturbance were positively associated with changes in depression and anxiety, reinforcing the robust relationship between poor sleep quality and mental health. Furthermore, individuals who reported greater sleep disturbance during the pandemic experienced lower relative proportions of both REM and deep sleep. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on university students is multi-faceted-mental health, sleep quality, and the amount of restorative sleep are negatively affected by the pandemic environment. These compounded effects exacerbate the health consequences of the pandemic and highlight a need for increased attention to the prevention and treatment of mental health disorders, particularly in vulnerable populations of young adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Young Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Sleep , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
11.
Ital J Pediatr ; 48(1): 60, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased incidence of central precocious puberty (CPP) after coronavirus infectious disease-19 lockdown has been reported. Our study aims in investigating changes in CPP rates and in sleep patterns in CPP and healthy controls. METHODS: CPP were retrospectively evaluated from April 2020 to April 2021. Parents of girls diagnosed with CPP during lockdown and of matched healthy controls filled out a questionnaire about sleep disturbances (SDSC questionnaire) and sleep schedules. RESULTS: Thirty-five CPP and 37 controls completed the survey. Incidence of new CPP cases significantly increased in 2020-2021 compared to 2017-2020 (5:100 vs 2:100, p = 0.02). Sleep disturbance rates did not differ between CPP and healthy controls before lockdown. During lockdown, CPP reported higher rates of sleep disturbs for total score (p = 0.005), excessive somnolence (p = 0.049), sleep breathing disorders (p = 0.049), and sleep-wake transition disorders (p = 0.005). Moreover, CPP group more frequently shifted toward later bedtime (p = 0.03) during lockdown compared to controls. Hours of sleep and smartphone exposure around bedtime did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms the observation of increased incidence of CPP after lockdown measures. Additionally, CPP showed higher rates of sleep disturbances and later bedtime compared to controls. The causality link between sleep disturbances and CPP should be further investigated to gain knowledge in this association.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Puberty, Precocious , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Puberty, Precocious/epidemiology , Puberty, Precocious/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
12.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(10)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066246

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Home confinement due to COVID-19 lockdown led to changes in daily routines, including social interactions, as well as restrictions on the possibility of playing sports and eating habits. These changes could have a greater impact on patients suffering from chronic diseases, such as endocrine patients, especially in emotional and behavioral dimensions. Materials and Methods: This study aimed to assess the effects of COVID-19-induced quarantine on daily habits in a group of patients with endocrine disorders, focusing on food consumption, eating habits and sleep during the confinement. Eighty-five endocrine patients were enrolled. A structured interview was administered to investigate socio-demographic information, general medical conditions, and habits adopted during quarantine. All patients underwent the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1) to assess state anxiety. Result: Results showed that subjects mainly had a sedentary lifestyle. We found a significant increase in the number of cigarettes in smokers and in meals consumed during confinement, as well as a high rate of sleep disturbance, especially insomnia. Notably, physical well-being resulted to be a predictive factor (OR = 0.38; 95%CI = [0.95,0.66]), whereas anxiety was a risk factor for sleep disorder (OR = 1.22; 95%CI = [1.10,1.40]), as was working in public and private offices and being a student. Conclusions: Changes in daily habits were likely due to the alterations in routine, resulting in greater boredom and inactivity during the day. In addition, future research should focus on the importance of patient adherence to therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Life Style , Surveys and Questionnaires , Communicable Disease Control , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology
14.
Neuropsychopharmacol Rep ; 42(3): 315-322, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2047863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disruptions in biological rhythm (BR) are considered a factor in the spread of many chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and depression. It has been shown that imbalance in BR disrupts the body's physiological timings; therefore, it is essential to have a tool for BR evaluation. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 403 Jordanian participants (200 depressed people and 203 control groups). Classical test theory (CTT) was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Arabic version of BRIAN. We aimed to validate the Arabic version of Biological Rhythms Interview Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (BRIAN) by investigating its internal consistency and validity, assessing its factor structure, and exploring its relationships with depression and sleep disorders. RESULTS: The internal consistency (α) was 0.91. The concurrent validity was supported by the severity of depression and sleep disorders (r = 0.87, r = 0.83, p < 0.001). The BRIAN's ability to differentiate between depressed people and the control group supported its discriminant validity (t = 21.2, p = 0.001). With a sensitivity of 75 and a specificity of 95.57, BRIAN revealed good accuracy in distinguishing between depressed and non-depressed persons at cutoff 44. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) analyses supported its proposed three-factor solutions. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that the BRIAN-A has acceptable validity in detecting BR and could be useful in examining the impact of circadian disturbance on the Arabic population.


Subject(s)
Neuropsychiatry , Sleep Wake Disorders , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Periodicity , Reproducibility of Results , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
15.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(10)2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043862

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: Sleep disorders are a common public health problem among college students. The objective of this study was to evaluate sleep quality and its associated factors in medical students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional analytical study-we conducted a secondary analysis of the survey "Nomophobia in medical students in Peru" database between 2020 and 2021. Sleep disturbances were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). To evaluate associated factors, crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results: We analyzed data from 3139 participants from 18 cities in Peru (61.1% were women, median age: 22 years). 43.4% had a quality of sleep that could require medical attention; the PSQI dimension with the highest score was daytime dysfunction. The poor sleep quality was associated with symptoms of anxiety (aPR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.27-1.72), depression (aPR: 2.03; 1.72-2.39), or nomophobia (aPR: 1.28; 1.09-1.51). Conclusions: Sleep disorders were a common problem among Peruvian medical students and were associated with anxiety, depression, or nomophobia symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Students, Medical , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Male , Peru/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis
16.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 572, 2022 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009370

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous publications suggested that lockdown is likely to impact daily living issues of individuals with intellectual disabilities. The authors notably suspected an intensification of behavioural, eating and sleep problems. METHODS: To test these hypotheses, we conducted an international online survey about the impact of COVID-19-associated first lockdown on people with genetic neurodevelopmental disorders. This survey was carried out using GenIDA, an international participatory database collecting medical information on genetic neurodevelopmental disorders. Patients' relatives took part in this online survey from 30/04/2020 to 09/06/2020. This survey adapted from GenIDA standard questionnaire requested information on diagnosis, lifestyle and was based on yes/no answers to questions regarding behaviour, diet, and sleep, in the 6-months period before lockdown and during lockdown. We also asked relatives to evaluate the intensity of these problems by severity level. Finally, relatives could freely comment in open fields on the medical and/or quality of life problems they had encountered during lockdown. RESULTS: In total 199 participants-144 children and 45 adults-with neurodevelopmental disorders (intellectual disability (79.4%) and/or autism spectrum disorder (21.6%)) of various genetic origins, with near-equal male/female (96/103) contribution and originating mainly from Europe and Northern America, were included. The average lockdown duration at time of the survey was 57 days. We did not find differences in the frequency of behavioural, eating and sleep problems before and during lockdown. Moreover, there was no apparent difference in the intensity of eating and sleep disorders between both periods. However, for persons with behavioural problems at both periods, relatives reported an increase in aggressivity, self-aggressivity, depressiveness, stereotypies, and restricted interests during lockdown, all of which might be interpreted as consequences of a lack of stimulation or a reaction to unexpected changes in daily habits. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support previous studies that suggest that the negative impact of lockdown does not depend on the intellectual disability per se but on the associated comorbidities such as behavioural disorders. This study addresses the need for prevention of behavioural disturbance in the vulnerable population with genetic neurodevelopmental disabilities.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Intellectual Disability , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Adult , Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Intellectual Disability/complications , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Male , Quality of Life , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
17.
Anticancer Res ; 42(9): 4529-4533, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010567

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with locally advanced cancer of the esophagus or esophagogastric junction receive definitive or neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. Patient anticipation of this treatment can cause or aggravate distress and sleep disorders. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of sleep disorders and risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients assigned to radio-chemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated for pre-treatment sleep disorders. Investigated characteristics included age; sex; performance score; comorbidity index; previous malignancies; family history; distress score; emotional, physical or practical problems; tumor site; histology and grading; tumor stage; planned treatment; and relation to 2019 Coronavirus pandemic. RESULTS: Sleep problems were reported by 15 patients (39.5%). Significant associations were found for higher distress scores (p=0.016) and greater numbers of emotional problems (p<0.0001). A trend was observed for greater numbers of physical problems (p=0.176). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of sleep problems was high. Risk factors were found that can help identify patients requiring psychological support already prior to radio-chemotherapy.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Esophageal Neoplasms , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adenocarcinoma/pathology , Combined Modality Therapy , Esophageal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Esophageal Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Esophagectomy , Esophagogastric Junction/pathology , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/pathology
18.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 50: 102430, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has affected the aviation sector. The anxiety and fear caused by this newly emerging virus, whose effects are not fully known in the short and long term, may also cause problems in terms of flight safety. We aimed to evaluate fatigue and sleep problems associated with fear of COVID-19 during the early pandemic period in cabin crew. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional survey study consisting of 45 questions in total. Participants were cabin crew members on flight duty. An online questionnaire was sent to 2092 cabin crew in February-April 2021 via TASSA Cabin Crew Member's Association. The survey included questions about socio-demographic characteristics, flight times, flight types and COVID test history, as well as the international physical activity questionnaire-short form (IPAQ-SF), fatigue severity scale (FSS), Jenkins sleep scale (JSS) and fear of COVID-19 scale (FCV-19S). RESULTS: Out of 316 survey results obtained (response rate, 15%), 225 (71%) were included in the study, with a mean age (SD) of 32.54 (4.91) years, and 124 (55.1%) were women. According to IPAQ-SF, 27.6% of cabin crew were found to be inactive, 54.7% minimally active and 17.7% very active. According to FSS, pathological fatigue was found in 43.6%. The FSS score of the inactive group was higher than the others (Kruskal Wallis, p < 0.001). As the number of people living in the same house or flight time in the last 1 month increase, the fear of COVID-19 also increases (Spearman, p = 0.01 r = 0.171, and p = 0.049 r = 0.131). In addition, there was direct correlation between fear of COVID-19 and fatigue and sleep problems (Spearman, p = 0.001 r = 0.218, and p < 0.001 r = 0.26, respectively). CONCLUSION: This study shows that fatigue and sleep problems increase as the fear of COVID-19 increases in cabin crew during the early pandemic period. Consequently, precautions and further studies are needed, as fatigue and sleep disorders may primarily be related to the anxiety, fear and uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aerospace Medicine , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Female , Humans , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications
19.
Pan Afr Med J ; 42: 134, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969794

ABSTRACT

The main objective of this work is to describe the impact of lockdown on daily life, sleep and the mental health of Moroccan diabetics patients. The secondary objective is to study the factors affecting compliance with lockdown and deterioration of sleep in diabetic patients while lockdown. It´s a cross-sectional study including diabetic patients followed up at the Endocrinology department of Casablanca. Patients answered a questionnaire about Socio-demographic characteristics, Sleep-related characteristics and predominant activities during the lockdown. The psychological impact was assessed by the score of Anxiety and Depression Assessment Scale (HDAS). Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 20 software. Bedtime was shifted by 53 minutes during the lockdown. Waking time was also 1 hour 18 minutes later, while sleep duration increased from 8 hours 20 minutes before lockdown to 8 hours 30 minutes during it (p=0.24) with a deterioration in sleep quality reported by 53 patients. Sleep deterioration was not correlated with anxiety or duration of screen exposure, but was more related to age between 50 and 65 years old. HAD score showed anxiety in 29 patients which were correlated to the female gender. The study included 100 patients with an average age of 48 years. 38 patients had a professional activity before lockdown, 5 of them kept working face-to-face, 3 teleworked and 30 were unemployed. Only 59 % of them respected lockdown. This respect was correlated with female gender, educational level and the number of members under the same roof when it is more than 6. Deterioration in sleep, a change in bedtime and waking time and an increase in anxiety was observed in diabetic patients during the lockdown. Therefore, the psychiatric care system needs to adapt to provide psychological support not only to infected persons but also to other vulnerable communities including diabetic patients.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Sleep Wake Disorders , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Memory Disorders , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
20.
Cien Saude Colet ; 27(8): 3157-3170, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963149

ABSTRACT

This article aims to analyze the factors associated with suicidal ideation in the COVID-19 pandemic. A cross-sectional home-based survey, with three-stage cluster sampling, was conducted with 4,203 adults from ten municipalities in the Mato Grosso, Brazil. The data collection was carried households to assessment of sociodemographic characteristics, substance use and behavior in the pandemic. The Level 1 Symptom Cross Scale was used to identify suicidal ideation and aspects of mental health (somatic symptoms, sleep disturbances, dissociation, depression, anger, mania, anxiety, thoughts, substance use and memory). Chemiluminescence was used to detect IgG anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 19.2%, and the associated with increased consumption of alcohol (RP=1.16), smoking (RP=1.30), COVID-19 symptoms (RP=1.03), having one's life affected (RP=1.04), mental illness (RP=1.09) somatic symptoms (RP=1.15), sleep disturbance (RP=1.30), dissociation (RP=1.24), depression (RP=1.24), anger (RP=1.11), anxiety (RP=1.26), substance use (RP=1.19), drug prescription use (RP=1.18) and memory (RP=1.87). Highlights the high prevalence of suicidal ideation related to COVID-19 symptoms, changes in behavior post-pandemic and mental health factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Suicidal Ideation
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