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1.
In Vivo ; 36(1): 325-329, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594965

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with malignant gliomas are scheduled for radiochemotherapy, which may cause emotional distress associated with sleep problems. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of such sleep problems in these patients and identify risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-seven patients scheduled for radiochemotherapy for grade II-IV gliomas were retrospectively investigated for pre-treatment sleep problems. Fifteen characteristics were evaluated including temporal relation to COVID-19 pandemic, age, gender, performance status, comorbidity, (family) history of malignancies, distress score, emotional problems, physical problems, practical problems, involved sites, glioma grade, upfront surgery, and corticosteroids. RESULTS: Nineteen patients stated pre-treatment sleep problems (prevalence=66.7%). Significant associations with sleep problems were found for female gender (p=0.023), presence of emotional problems (p=0.006), and ≥4 physical problems (p<0.001). A trend was found for distress scores ≥5 (p=0.077). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of sleep problems was high. Risk factors were determined that can be used to identify patients who likely benefit from psychological support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glioma , Sleep Wake Disorders , Chemoradiotherapy , Female , Glioma/complications , Glioma/drug therapy , Glioma/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2134803, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516698

ABSTRACT

Importance: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 is associated with fatigue and sleep problems long after the acute phase of COVID-19. In addition, there are concerns of SARS-CoV-2 infection causing psychiatric illness; however, evidence of a direct effect is inconclusive. Objective: To assess risk of risk of incident or repeat psychiatric illness, fatigue, or sleep problems following SARS-CoV-2 infection and to analyze changes according to demographic subgroups. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study assembled matched cohorts using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink Aurum, a UK primary care registry of 11 923 499 individuals aged 16 years or older. Patients were followed-up for up to 10 months, from February 1 to December 9, 2020. Individuals with less than 2 years of historical data or less than 1 week follow-up were excluded. Individuals with positive results on a SARS-CoV-2 test without prior mental illness or with anxiety or depression, psychosis, fatigue, or sleep problems were matched with up to 4 controls based on sex, general practice, and year of birth. Controls were individuals who had negative SARS-CoV-2 test results. Data were analyzed from January to July 2021. Exposure: SARS-CoV-2 infection, determined via polymerase chain reaction testing. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cox proportional hazard models estimated the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result and subsequent psychiatric morbidity (depression, anxiety, psychosis, or self-harm), sleep problems, fatigue, or psychotropic prescribing. Models adjusted for comorbidities, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index. Results: Of 11 923 105 eligible individuals (6 011 020 [50.4%] women and 5 912 085 [49.6%] men; median [IQR] age, 44 [30-61] years), 232 780 individuals (2.0%) had positive result on a SARS-CoV-2 test. After applying selection criteria, 86 922 individuals were in the matched cohort without prior mental illness, 19 020 individuals had prior anxiety or depression, 1036 individuals had psychosis, 4152 individuals had fatigue, and 4539 individuals had sleep problems. After adjusting for observed confounders, there was an association between positive SARS-CoV-2 test results and psychiatric morbidity (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.66-2.02), fatigue (aHR, 5.98; 95% CI, 5.33-6.71), and sleep problems (aHR, 3.16; 95% CI, 2.64-3.78). However, there was a similar risk of incident psychiatric morbidity for those with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test results (aHR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.65-1.77) and a larger increase associated with influenza (aHR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.55-5.75). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of individuals registered at an English primary care practice during the pandemic, there was consistent evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with increased risk of fatigue and sleep problems. However, the results from the negative control analysis suggest that unobserved confounding may be responsible for at least some of the positive association between COVID-19 and psychiatric morbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/etiology , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep , Adult , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , England/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Primary Health Care , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/etiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259594, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504862

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the lives of many people, including medical students. The present study explored internet addiction and changes in sleep patterns among medical students during the pandemic and assessed the relationship between them. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in seven countries, the Dominican Republic, Egypt, Guyana, India, Mexico, Pakistan, and Sudan, using a convenience sampling technique, an online survey comprising demographic details, information regarding COVID-19, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Internet Addiction Test (IAT). RESULTS: In total, 2749 participants completed the questionnaire. Of the total, 67.6% scored above 30 in the IAT, suggesting the presence of an Internet addiction, and 73.5% scored equal and above 5 in the PSQI, suggesting poor sleep quality. Internet addiction was found to be significant predictors of poor sleep quality, causing 13.2% of the variance in poor sleep quality. Participants who reported COVID-19 related symptoms had disturbed sleep and higher internet addiction levels when compared with those who did not. Participants who reported a diagnosis of COVID-19 reported poor sleep quality. Those living with a COVID-19 diagnosed patient reported higher internet addiction and worse sleep quality compared with those who did not have any COVID-19 patients in their surroundings. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that internet addiction and poor sleep quality are two issues that require addressing amongst medical students. Medical training institutions should do their best to minimize their negative impact, particularly during the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Internet Addiction Disorder/complications , Internet Addiction Disorder/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep , Students, Medical , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internationality , Language , Male , Pandemics , Research Design , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(5): 296-: I-303, XXVIII, oct. 2021. tab, ilus
Article in English, Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1502722

ABSTRACT

Los problemas del sueño (PS) son frecuentes, principalmente en niñas y niños con trastornos del desarrollo (TD), y causan un impacto en su funcionamiento y calidad de vida familiar. El pediatra tiene un rol importante en su abordaje. Objetivo. Definir la frecuencia y los tipos de PS en una muestra de niñas y niños con TD, determinar la proporción de pediatras que abordaron estas dificultades, evaluar los efectos de la higiene del sueño (HS) y describir el impacto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en el sueño. Población y métodos. Estudio cuasiexperimental. El diagnóstico de PS se realizó con la preocupación de los padres y/o criterios clínicos. Se brindaron estrategias de HS, luego se evaluó su efecto según referencia de los padres y uso del cuestionario CSHQ-S (Children ́s Sleep Habits Questionnaire en español) pre- y posestrategias. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19, se midió nuevamente la variable PS y las relacionadas a HS. Resultados. Se incluyeron 161 niñas y niños. La frecuencia de PS fue del 55 %. El 80 % mejoró con HS. El 83 % tenía pediatra de cabecera, y de ellos, el 45 % había preguntado acerca del sueño. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 hubo aumento de PS y cambios en las variables de HS. Conclusión. Aproximadamente la mitad de los niñas y niños con TD presentan PS; esto solo fue abordado por el 45 % de los pediatras. La HS resultó beneficiosa para la mayoría, por lo que la intervención del pediatra parece fundamental. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 aumentaron los PS, como posible reflejo del impacto ambiental en los niñas y niños con TD.


Sleep problems (SPs) are common, especially among children with developmental disorders (DDs), and affect their functioning and quality of family life. Pediatricians play a major role in their management. Objective. To define the frequency and types of SPs in a sample of children with DDs, determine the proportion of pediatricians who addressed such difficulties, assess the effects of sleep hygiene (SH), and describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep. Population and methods. This was a quasi-experiment. SPs were diagnosed based on parents' concerns and/or clinical criteria. SH strategies were provided and their effect was assessed as per parents' reports and the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire in Spanish (CSHQ-S) before and after the strategies. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the SP outcome measure and SH-related outcome measures were measured again. Results. A total of 161 children were included. The frequency of SPs was 55 %; 80 % improved with SH. Eighty-three percent of children had a primary pediatrician; of these, 45 % had consulted about sleep. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased and SH outcome measures changed. Conclusion. Approximately half of children with DDs have SPs; and the problem was only addressed by 45 % of pediatricians. SH was beneficial for most children, so pediatricians' role seems critical. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased, probably as a result of its environmental impact on children with DD


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Sleep , Developmental Disabilities , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 39, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502776

ABSTRACT

Introduction: as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spreads, sleep problems are expected to increase among healthcare workers. Therefore, we aimed to assess the knowledge of COVID-19, sleep problem and identify sociodemographic factors associated with sleep problems among healthcare workers in a Nigerian neuropsychiatric hospital. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 healthcare workers in a neuropsychiatric hospital using self-administered questionnaires to assess knowledge of COVID-19, sleep problem, social support, and sociodemographic factors that affect sleep. Chi-square test and Spearman's correlation were applied to assess the association between sociodemographic factors and sleep problems. Results: about 23.9% of the healthcare workers reported having a sleep problem. However, there was no association of sleep problems with any sociodemographic factors except age (r=0.26) and social support (r=-0.18). Conclusion: the study offered insight into the occurrence of sleep problems among healthcare workers and suggested a guide for planning interventions targeted at improving the psychological well-being of healthcare workers in the face of current global pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Male , Nigeria , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Psychiatry Res ; 301: 113863, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474998

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its accompanying infection control measures introduced significant disruptions to the routines of many higher education students around the world. It also deprived them of in-person counselling services and social support. These changes have put students at a greater risk of developing mental illness. The objective of this review is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances in higher education students during the pandemic. A systematic search of English and Chinese databases was conducted current to January 1st, 2021. The quality of included studies was evaluated using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Eighty-nine studies (n=1,441,828) were included. The pooled prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and sleep disturbances was 34%, 32% and 33%, respectively. The prevalence values differ based on geographical regions, diagnostic criteria, education level, undergraduate year of study, financial situation, living arrangements and gender. Overall, the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms synthesized in this study was higher compared to pre-pandemic prevalence in similar populations. Evidently, mental health screening and intervention should be a top priority for universities and colleges during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep/physiology , Universities
8.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 85(3): 254-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470682

ABSTRACT

Sleep problems among frontline medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic require attention. A total of 249 frontline medical staff who were recruited to support Wuhan completed this cross-sectional study. A web-based questionnaire about insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue was used to assess mental health status. The prevalence of sleep disorders among frontline medical staff was 50.6%. More time spent in Wuhan and a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue were associated with a higher risk of insomnia. People who stayed in Wuhan for a long time with a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue symptoms might be at high risk of insomnia.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , China , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463693

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, characterized by home confinement and other restrictive measures to reduce the spread of the infection, led to significant changes in people's habits and lifestyle. One of the most common problems is the worsening of sleep quality or quantity, which could have negative effects on psychological wellbeing, particularly in older adults. The purposes of the present literature review considering healthy aging subjects are (a) to examine the existing research on sleep alterations during the current pandemic and (b) to highlight possible relationships between sleep problems and psychological distress. A systematic search strategy was implemented according to PRISMA guidelines in the international literature online databases, up to 1 July 2021. After identification and screening phases, 11 articles were included in this review. The studies found possible associations between sleep problems and mood changes-particularly in terms of depression and anxiety. In addition, altered sleep patterns seemed to be related to changes in individual aspects, lifestyle, and attitudes adopted by older adults during the COVID-19 lockdown. Thus, the pandemic could affect the sleep and psychological wellbeing of the older population, even in healthy aging.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Psychological Distress , Sleep Wake Disorders , Aged , Anxiety , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
10.
Rev Colomb Obstet Ginecol ; 72(2): 162-170, 2021 06 30.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456600

ABSTRACT

Objective: To make an approximation to the prevalence of sleep disorders in Colombian menopausal women during the COVID-19 pandemic Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study as part of the Quality of Life in Menopause and Colombian Ethnic Groups research project [CAVIMEC+COVID STUDY]. The population consisted of women born and residing in Colombia, 40 to 59 years of age, who signed an informed consent and agreed to participate by completing an online form, freely and anonymously, in the first five days of June 2020. Sleep disorders were identified using the third item on the Menopause Rating Scale. Sociodemographic characteristics, presence and severity of sleep disorders and menopause status were explored. Descriptive statistics are provided. Results: Overall, 984 women aged 47.0 [IQR: 42.0-53.5] years were included: 84.5% mestizo, 13.7% Afro-Colombian, 1.7% indigenous; 39.3% were postmenopausal; 70% lived in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Sleep disorders were reported by 637 women (64.7%), and 112 (11.3%) had severe sleep disorders. Among postmenopausal women, 65.1% reported sleep disorders with 10.1% reporting severe disorders, while 64.5% of premenopausal reported sleep disorders, and 12.2% severe disorders. Conclusions: Sleep disorders could be a frequent problem among premenopausal as well as postmenopausal women in the pandemic time. This issue should be explored during gynecological visits in order to offer solutions. Population studies that confirm these observations are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Colombia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Menopause , Middle Aged , Prevalence
11.
Anticancer Res ; 41(10): 5165-5169, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449417

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with prostate cancer receive definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify the frequency of sleep disturbances and corresponding risk factors prior to radiation treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data of 48 patients assigned to local or loco-regional irradiation for prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed for pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances. Fifteen characteristics were analyzed including age, performance status, comorbidity, history of previous malignancy, distress score, (emotional, physical or practical) problems, prostate-specific antigen, primary tumor stage, Gleason-score, upfront androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), treatment volume, brachytherapy, and COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances were reported by 20.8% of patients and significantly associated with distress scores ≥4 (p<0.0001) and ≥3 physical problems (p=0.0001). Trends were found for Karnofsky performance score ≤80 (p=0.095), Gleason score 7b-9 (p=0.079), and ADT (p=0.067). CONCLUSION: Pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances were less common in prostate cancer patients than in other cancer patients. Risk factors were identified that can help identify patients requiring psychological support prior to radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Prostatic Neoplasms/psychology , Prostatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
12.
Anticancer Res ; 41(10): 5065-5069, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449416

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with head-and-neck cancer are scheduled for irradiation. This study was performed to determine the frequency of and risk factors for pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances in these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 103 patients with head-and-neck cancer scheduled for radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Eighteen characteristics were evaluated including timing of start of radiotherapy relative to COVID-19 pandemic; age; gender; Karnofsky performance score; Charlson comorbidity index; history of another malignancy; family history of malignancy; distress score; number of emotional, physical or practical problems; request for psychological support; tumor site and stage; upfront surgery; planned chemotherapy; and brachytherapy boost. RESULTS: The frequency of pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances was 42.7%. This was significantly associated with age ≤63 years (p=0.049), Karnofsky performance score ≤80 (p=0.002), Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 (p=0.005), history of another malignancy (p=0.012), emotional (p=0.001) or physical (p<0.001) problems, and request for psychological support (p=0.002). CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbances were frequent in patients assigned to radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer. Recognizing risk factors for sleep disturbance helps identify patients requiring psychological support.


Subject(s)
Head and Neck Neoplasms/psychology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
13.
Tuberk Toraks ; 69(3): 387-391, 2021 Sep.
Article in Turkish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441340

ABSTRACT

As a pandemic sweeping over the world, COVID-19 has led to significant changes in daily routines and lifestyle. People closed to their homes to reduce their contact with each other and socialization took place with telecommunication facilities. Moreover, factors like an extended period of isolation, fear of infection, uncertainty, disappointment, insufficient supplies, and economic damage also negatively impacted individuals' psychological wellbeing. Psychosocial stressors affected the pattern of sleep and caused worsening of sleep quality in individuals. As a result of all this, sleep disorders have emerged. Sleep disturbances during pandemic have been referred as COVID-somnia. In this review, the relationship of COVID-19 infection and sleep, and sleep disorders during COVID-19 pandemic are presented in the light of the literature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
14.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(5): 296-303, 2021 10.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441334

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Sleep problems (SPs) are common, especially among children with developmental disorders (DDs), and affect their functioning and quality of family life. Pediatricians play a major role in their management. OBJECTIVE: To define the frequency and types of SPs in a sample of children with DDs, determine the proportion of pediatricians who addressed such difficulties, assess the effects of sleep hygiene (SH), and describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep. POPULATION AND METHODS: This was a quasiexperiment. SPs were diagnosed based on parents' concerns and/or clinical criteria. SH strategies were provided and their effect was assessed as per parents' reports and the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire in Spanish (CSHQ-S) before and after the strategies. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the SP outcome measure and SH-related outcome measures were measured again. RESULTS: A total of 161 children were included. The frequency of SPs was 55 %; 80 % improved with SH. Eighty-three percent of children had a primary pediatrician; of these, 45 % had consulted about sleep. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased and SH outcome measures changed. CONCLUSION: Approximately half of children with DDs have SPs; and the problem was only addressed by 45 % of pediatricians. SH was beneficial for most children, so pediatricians' role seems critical. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased, probably as a result of its environmental impact on children with DDs.


Los problemas del sueño (PS) son frecuentes, principalmente en niñas y niños con trastornos del desarrollo (TD), y causan un impacto en su funcionamiento y calidad de vida familiar. El pediatra tiene un rol importante en su abordaje. Objetivo. Definir la frecuencia y los tipos de PS en una muestra de niñas y niños con TD, determinar la proporción de pediatras que abordaron estas dificultades, evaluar los efectos de la higiene del sueño (HS) y describir el impacto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en el sueño. Población y métodos. Estudio cuasiexperimental. El diagnóstico de PS se realizó con la preocupación de los padres y/o criterios clínicos. Se brindaron estrategias de HS, luego se evaluó su efecto según referencia de los padres y uso del cuestionario CSHQ-S (Children´s Sleep Habits Questionnaire en español) pre- y posestrategias. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19, se midió nuevamente la variable PS y las relacionadas a HS. Resultados. Se incluyeron 161 niñas y niños. La frecuencia de PS fue del 55 %. El 80 % mejoró con HS. El 83 % tenía pediatra de cabecera, y de ellos, el 45 % había preguntado acerca del sueño. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 hubo aumento de PS y cambios en las variables de HS. Conclusión. Aproximadamente la mitad de los niñas y niños con TD presentan PS; esto solo fue abordado por el 45 % de los pediatras. La HS resultó beneficiosa para la mayoría, por lo que la intervención del pediatra parece fundamental. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 aumentaron los PS, como posible reflejo del impacto ambiental en los niñas y niños con TD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Child , Developmental Disabilities , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Anticancer Res ; 41(9): 4439-4442, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy are common treatments for rectal and anal cancer. Anticipation of treatment may cause distress and sleep disorders. This study aimed to identify risk factors for sleep disorders. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 42 patients with rectal or anal cancer scheduled for radiotherapy, 16 characteristics were analyzed for associations with pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders including age, gender, performance score, comorbidity, patient's or family history of additional cancer/melanoma, distress score, emotional/physical/practical problems, tumor site and stage, surgery and relation to COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Overall prevalence of pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders was 42.9%. Sleep disorders were significantly associated with Karnofsky performance score 60-80 (p=0.044), Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 (p=0.0012), distress score 6-10 (p=0.00012), and more emotional (p=0.0012), physical (p=0.0004) or practical (p=0.033) problems. A trend was found for female gender (p=0.061). CONCLUSION: Sleep disorders were common in patients with rectal or anal cancer scheduled for radiotherapy. Risk factors can help identify patients requiring psychooncological support already prior to the start of radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Anus Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Anus Neoplasms/surgery , Rectal Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Rectal Neoplasms/surgery , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Aged , Anus Neoplasms/pathology , Anus Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Prevalence , Rectal Neoplasms/pathology , Rectal Neoplasms/psychology , Sex Characteristics , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Treatment Outcome
16.
Anticancer Res ; 41(9): 4407-4410, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with gynecological malignancies receive postoperative radiotherapy, which can lead to fear and sleep disorders. We aimed to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for sleep disorders. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-two patients assigned to radiotherapy for gynecological malignancies were retrospectively evaluated. Seventeen characteristics were analyzed for associations with pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders including age, Karnofsky performance score, Charlson comorbidity index, history of additional malignancy, family history of gynecological cancer, distress score, emotional, physical or practical problems, tumor site/stage; chemotherapy, treatment volume, brachytherapy, and the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders was 46.8%. Sleep disorders were significantly associated with Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 (p=0.012), greater number of physical problems (p<0.0001), and advanced primary tumor stage (p=0.005). A trend was found for greater number of emotional problems (p=0.075). CONCLUSION: Pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders are common in patients with gynecological malignancies, particularly in those with specific risk factors. Patients should be offered early psychological support.


Subject(s)
Genital Neoplasms, Female/radiotherapy , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Brachytherapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/pathology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Treatment Outcome
18.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 143(2): 206-209, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic became a challenge to maintain care for patients with epilepsy; we aimed to find out how the pandemic affected them. METHODS: We sent an online 22-item questionnaire to patients from our outpatient clinic, a reference centre in Spain for drug-resistant epilepsy, inquiring about the effects of lockdown, from March to May 2020. RESULTS: We sent the survey to 627 patients; 312 (58% women) sent a complete response and were included. Of all respondents, 57% took >2 antiseizure medications. One-third of respondents (29%) declared an associated cognitive or motor disability. A minority had confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 (1.92%). Seizure frequency remained like usual in 56% of patients, while 31.2% reported an increase. Less than 10% needed emergent assistance. Almost half reported anxiety or depression, and 25% increased behavioural disorders. Mood (F: 5.40; p: 0.002) and sleep disorders (F = 2.67; p: 0.05) were associated with increase in seizure frequency. Patients were able to contact their physicians when needed and were open to a future telematic approach to follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Seizure frequency and severity remained unchanged in most patients during the lockdown. Mood and sleep disorders were common and associated with seizure worsening. Patients were open to telematic care in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Anxiety/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/complications , Disabled Persons , Epilepsy/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Motor Disorders/complications , Outpatients , Seizures/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/classification , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
19.
Ind Health ; 59(5): 308-317, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363588

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, many employees have been required to work full or part-time at home. This paper investigates the impact of perceived privacy on cognitive irritation and sleep problems among employees who worked from home during the pandemic. Additionally, we analyzed the role of cognitive irritation as a mediator between privacy and sleep problems. We created a cross-sectional questionnaire, which was completed by 293 employees who performed home-based telework in German-speaking Switzerland. A mediation analysis was then conducted using a multiple regression analysis. A test of the indirect effect showed a significant mediation path from perceived privacy via cognitive irritation to sleep problems. Hence, the negative indirect effect indicates that perceived privacy is an important job resource that may prevent sleep problems. Further research is needed regarding home-based telework and recovery strategies to prevent sleep problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Privacy/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Teleworking/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Socioeconomic Factors , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
Rev Colomb Obstet Ginecol ; 72(2): 162-170, 2021 06 30.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362784

ABSTRACT

Objective: To make an approximation to the prevalence of sleep disorders in Colombian menopausal women during the COVID-19 pandemic Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study as part of the Quality of Life in Menopause and Colombian Ethnic Groups research project [CAVIMEC+COVID STUDY]. The population consisted of women born and residing in Colombia, 40 to 59 years of age, who signed an informed consent and agreed to participate by completing an online form, freely and anonymously, in the first five days of June 2020. Sleep disorders were identified using the third item on the Menopause Rating Scale. Sociodemographic characteristics, presence and severity of sleep disorders and menopause status were explored. Descriptive statistics are provided. Results: Overall, 984 women aged 47.0 [IQR: 42.0-53.5] years were included: 84.5% mestizo, 13.7% Afro-Colombian, 1.7% indigenous; 39.3% were postmenopausal; 70% lived in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Sleep disorders were reported by 637 women (64.7%), and 112 (11.3%) had severe sleep disorders. Among postmenopausal women, 65.1% reported sleep disorders with 10.1% reporting severe disorders, while 64.5% of premenopausal reported sleep disorders, and 12.2% severe disorders. Conclusions: Sleep disorders could be a frequent problem among premenopausal as well as postmenopausal women in the pandemic time. This issue should be explored during gynecological visits in order to offer solutions. Population studies that confirm these observations are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Colombia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Menopause , Middle Aged , Prevalence
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