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1.
Ital J Pediatr ; 48(1): 60, 2022 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased incidence of central precocious puberty (CPP) after coronavirus infectious disease-19 lockdown has been reported. Our study aims in investigating changes in CPP rates and in sleep patterns in CPP and healthy controls. METHODS: CPP were retrospectively evaluated from April 2020 to April 2021. Parents of girls diagnosed with CPP during lockdown and of matched healthy controls filled out a questionnaire about sleep disturbances (SDSC questionnaire) and sleep schedules. RESULTS: Thirty-five CPP and 37 controls completed the survey. Incidence of new CPP cases significantly increased in 2020-2021 compared to 2017-2020 (5:100 vs 2:100, p = 0.02). Sleep disturbance rates did not differ between CPP and healthy controls before lockdown. During lockdown, CPP reported higher rates of sleep disturbs for total score (p = 0.005), excessive somnolence (p = 0.049), sleep breathing disorders (p = 0.049), and sleep-wake transition disorders (p = 0.005). Moreover, CPP group more frequently shifted toward later bedtime (p = 0.03) during lockdown compared to controls. Hours of sleep and smartphone exposure around bedtime did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms the observation of increased incidence of CPP after lockdown measures. Additionally, CPP showed higher rates of sleep disturbances and later bedtime compared to controls. The causality link between sleep disturbances and CPP should be further investigated to gain knowledge in this association.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Puberty, Precocious , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Puberty, Precocious/epidemiology , Puberty, Precocious/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
2.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(10)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066246

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Home confinement due to COVID-19 lockdown led to changes in daily routines, including social interactions, as well as restrictions on the possibility of playing sports and eating habits. These changes could have a greater impact on patients suffering from chronic diseases, such as endocrine patients, especially in emotional and behavioral dimensions. Materials and Methods: This study aimed to assess the effects of COVID-19-induced quarantine on daily habits in a group of patients with endocrine disorders, focusing on food consumption, eating habits and sleep during the confinement. Eighty-five endocrine patients were enrolled. A structured interview was administered to investigate socio-demographic information, general medical conditions, and habits adopted during quarantine. All patients underwent the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1) to assess state anxiety. Result: Results showed that subjects mainly had a sedentary lifestyle. We found a significant increase in the number of cigarettes in smokers and in meals consumed during confinement, as well as a high rate of sleep disturbance, especially insomnia. Notably, physical well-being resulted to be a predictive factor (OR = 0.38; 95%CI = [0.95,0.66]), whereas anxiety was a risk factor for sleep disorder (OR = 1.22; 95%CI = [1.10,1.40]), as was working in public and private offices and being a student. Conclusions: Changes in daily habits were likely due to the alterations in routine, resulting in greater boredom and inactivity during the day. In addition, future research should focus on the importance of patient adherence to therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Life Style , Surveys and Questionnaires , Communicable Disease Control , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology
4.
Anticancer Res ; 42(9): 4529-4533, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010567

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with locally advanced cancer of the esophagus or esophagogastric junction receive definitive or neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. Patient anticipation of this treatment can cause or aggravate distress and sleep disorders. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of sleep disorders and risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients assigned to radio-chemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated for pre-treatment sleep disorders. Investigated characteristics included age; sex; performance score; comorbidity index; previous malignancies; family history; distress score; emotional, physical or practical problems; tumor site; histology and grading; tumor stage; planned treatment; and relation to 2019 Coronavirus pandemic. RESULTS: Sleep problems were reported by 15 patients (39.5%). Significant associations were found for higher distress scores (p=0.016) and greater numbers of emotional problems (p<0.0001). A trend was observed for greater numbers of physical problems (p=0.176). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of sleep problems was high. Risk factors were found that can help identify patients requiring psychological support already prior to radio-chemotherapy.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Esophageal Neoplasms , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adenocarcinoma/pathology , Combined Modality Therapy , Esophageal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Esophageal Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Esophagectomy , Esophagogastric Junction/pathology , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/pathology
5.
Anticancer Res ; 42(9): 4511-4515, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Organ-sparing treatment is increasingly used for bladder cancer, particularly for patients with significant comorbidities or advanced age. The upcoming treatment can cause distress and sleep disturbances. This study investigated pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances in these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients with bladder cancer scheduled for local or loco-regional radiotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. Sixteen characteristics were analyzed for sleep disturbances including age, sex, performance score, comorbidities, previous malignancy, distress score, emotional problems, physical problems, treatment situation, treatment intent, current primary tumor and nodal stage, distant metastasis, treatment volume, concurrent chemotherapy, and Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic. RESULTS: Eleven patients (50.0%) reported sleep disturbances that were significantly associated with distress scores ≥5 (p=0.035). Trends were found for age ≤75 years (p=0.183), ≥2 emotional problems (p=0.183), ≥5 physical problems (p=0.064), and distant metastasis (p=0.090). CONCLUSION: Half of the patients reported pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances. Risk factors facilitate identification of patients requiring psychological support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Chemoradiotherapy/adverse effects , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/complications , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/therapy
6.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 122(5. Vyp. 2): 23-28, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1912337

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus infection, which has begun in 2019, has not ended to this day. COVID-19 adversely affects human health not only in the acute period of the disease, but also in the long-run: in a large percentage of cases, recovery takes very long, patients require and often have problems returning to their baseline. During the first wave of the pandemic in 2020, researchers noted that about 10-20% of patients didn't fully recover three weeks after the onset of the disease. It is still not clear how long the recovery period can last, and what are the reasons of different time course of the recovery. Long-term recovery after a viral infection is a non-unique feature of COVID-19, which does not facilitate the management of patients with post-COVID syndrome. The impact on mental health after COVID-19 is significant, and at least 30% of those, who have been ill, may have symptoms of anxiety and/or depression after the acute phase of the disease. Since the emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, there has been an increase in somnological disorders by 42%, while every third COVID-19 patient reports altered sleep patterns. In post-COVID-19 syndrome, this condition is referred to as Coronasomnia (COVID-somnia). The success of therapy of this condition depends on reporting and treating mental disorders in patients, as anxiety and depression are often accompanied by sleep disorders, that is, there is a bidirectional influence of mental disorders on the quality of sleep. The article provides data on two anti-anxiety drugs (noofen and adaptol) that help to treat the manifestations of post-COVID syndrome accompanied by sleep disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Psychiatry , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/complications , Depression , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
7.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 122(5. Vyp. 2): 5, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1912336

ABSTRACT

In recent years, the problem of sleep disturbance has become particularly acute. The epidemic of coronavirus infection and lockdowns, the flow of contradictory information, as well as the decline in well-being have led to an almost threefold increase in the frequency of sleep disorders against the background of a surge in anxiety and depressive disorders. At the same time, the impact on sleep of foreign policy events and domestic tensions is still awaiting evaluation. According to the 1991 Gulf conflict health monitoring data, sleep disturbances were the most frequent manifestation of neurocognitive dysfunction along with irritability, reduced attention span, and forgetfulness.


Subject(s)
Cognition Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Humans , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
8.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 61: 103774, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Covid-19 pandemic caused relevant psychological consequences in the general population. Since people with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) are usually at higher risk of psychological distress than age-matched healthy controls (HC), a meta-analytic study was conducted, aimed at evaluating i) differences between pwMS and HC in the psychological variables during the pandemic, ii) differences in the levels of anxiety, depression, stress, sleep disturbances and quality of life before and during the Covid-19 pandemic in pwMS. METHODS: The literature search on three electronic databases yielded 196 studies (113 after the duplicates removal). Seven studies compared psychological variables between pwMS and HC during the pandemic, while seven studies evaluated the pre- vs during the pandemic differences in pwMS. The following outcomes were selected: depression, anxiety, physical QoL, mental QoL, stress, sleep quality/disturbances. Mean weighted effect sizes (ES) were calculated using Hedges'g, via Prometa3 software. RESULTS: During the pandemic, pwMS showed higher levels of depression (g = 0.51, p=.001), anxiety (g = 0.41, p=.032), and stress (g = 0.51, p=.016) compared to HC. The comparison on psychological outcomes before and during the pandemic in pwMS revealed no significant increase during the pandemic on levels of anxiety (g = 0.08, p=.380), depression (g = 0.02, p=.772), mental QoL (g= -0.14, p=.060), physical QoL (g = 0.00, p=.986), whereas sleep quality deteriorated during the pandemic (g = 0.52, p<.001). CONCLUSIONS: In agreement with pre-pandemic literature, pwMS showed higher levels of psychological distress than HC also during the Covid-19 pandemic. Contrariwise, longitudinal studies revealed that, in pwMS, the only psychological-associated variable that worsened significantly was the sleep quality, but this outcome was evaluated only in two studies. Future studies will have to assess/evaluate the long-term psychological consequences of the pandemic on pwMS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
9.
Neurology ; 99(1): e33-e45, 2022 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753150

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Little is known about trajectories of recovery 12 months after hospitalization for severe COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of patients with and without neurologic complications during index hospitalization for COVID-19 from March 10, 2020, to May 20, 2020. Phone follow-up batteries were performed at 6 and 12 months after COVID-19 onset. The primary 12-month outcome was the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score comparing patients with or without neurologic complications using multivariable ordinal analysis. Secondary outcomes included activities of daily living (Barthel Index), telephone Montreal Cognitive Assessment (t-MoCA), and Quality of Life in Neurologic Disorders (Neuro-QoL) batteries for anxiety, depression, fatigue, and sleep. Changes in outcome scores from 6 to 12 months were compared using nonparametric paired-samples sign test. RESULTS: Twelve-month follow-up was completed in 242 patients (median age 65 years, 64% male, 34% intubated during hospitalization) and 174 completed both 6- and 12-month follow-up. At 12 months, 197/227 (87%) had ≥1 abnormal metric: mRS >0 (75%), Barthel Index <100 (64%), t-MoCA ≤18 (50%), high anxiety (7%), depression (4%), fatigue (9%), or poor sleep (10%). Twelve-month mRS scores did not differ significantly among those with (n = 113) or without (n = 129) neurologic complications during hospitalization after adjusting for age, sex, race, pre-COVID-19 mRS, and intubation status (adjusted OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.8-2.5), although those with neurologic complications had higher fatigue scores (T score 47 vs 44; p = 0.037). Significant improvements in outcome trajectories from 6 to 12 months were observed in t-MoCA scores (56% improved, median difference 1 point; p = 0.002) and Neuro-QoL anxiety scores (45% improved; p = 0.003). Nonsignificant improvements occurred in fatigue, sleep, and depression scores in 48%, 48%, and 38% of patients, respectively. Barthel Index and mRS scores remained unchanged between 6 and 12 months in >50% of patients. DISCUSSION: At 12 months after hospitalization for severe COVID-19, 87% of patients had ongoing abnormalities in functional, cognitive, or Neuro-QoL metrics and abnormal cognition persisted in 50% of patients without a history of dementia/cognitive abnormality. Only fatigue severity differed significantly between patients with or without neurologic complications during index hospitalization. However, significant improvements in cognitive (t-MoCA) and anxiety (Neuro-QoL) scores occurred in 56% and 45% of patients, respectively, between 6 and 12 months. These results may not be generalizable to those with mild or moderate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction , Fatigue , Quality of Life , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Prospective Studies , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
10.
Ann Palliat Med ; 11(6): 1865-1875, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1743091

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sleep disturbance is well documented as a crucial element that impairs health. Depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), which on behalf of a patient's overall perception of emotional, physical and social well-being, are increasingly emphasized self-reported health outcomes especially during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Among dialysis patients, sleep disturbance is associated with depression and poorer HRQOL. The study was designed to depict the prevalence of sleep disturbance, and to explore the association among sleep, depression, and HRQOL in patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A total of 172 non-dialysis CKD patients enrolled in this cross-sectional study, with sociodemographic and clinical data recorded. Sleep, HRQOL, and depression were evaluated via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Kidney Disease Quality of Life 36-Item Short-Form Survey (KDQOL-36), and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), respectively. RESULTS: A total of 100 (58%) met the criteria for poor sleep. Good sleepers had strikingly disparate HRQOL and depression scores compared to poor sleepers. Sleep disorders were significantly associated with decreased HRQOL and increased depression in regression models adjusted or unadjusted for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Mediation analysis indicated depression was a significant mediator explaining 51% of the relationship between sleep status with physical component summary (PCS) and played a fully mediating role in the association between sleep and mental component summary (MCS). CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggested the high incidence of sleep disorders in patients with non-dialysis CKD during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the tight associations among sleep, depression, and HRQOL. Considering the negative influences of sleep and depression on HRQOL, appropriate screening and treatment for these treatable health-related domains are necessary for patients with non-dialysis CKD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/drug therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
11.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264331, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731597

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long Covid is a public health concern that needs defining, quantifying, and describing. We aimed to explore the initial and ongoing symptoms of Long Covid following SARS-CoV-2 infection and describe its impact on daily life. METHODS: We collected self-reported data through an online survey using convenience non-probability sampling. The survey enrolled adults who reported lab-confirmed (PCR or antibody) or suspected COVID-19 who were not hospitalised in the first two weeks of illness. This analysis was restricted to those with self-reported Long Covid. Univariate comparisons between those with and without confirmed COVID-19 infection were carried out and agglomerative hierarchical clustering was used to identify specific symptom clusters, and their demographic and functional correlates. RESULTS: We analysed data from 2550 participants with a median duration of illness of 7.6 months (interquartile range (IQR) 7.1-7.9). 26.5% reported lab-confirmation of infection. The mean age was 46.5 years (standard deviation 11 years) with 82.8% females and 79.9% of participants based in the UK. 89.5% described their health as good, very good or excellent before COVID-19. The most common initial symptoms that persisted were exhaustion, chest pressure/tightness, shortness of breath and headache. Cognitive dysfunction and palpitations became more prevalent later in the illness. Most participants described fluctuating (57.7%) or relapsing symptoms (17.6%). Physical activity, stress, and sleep disturbance commonly triggered symptoms. A third (32%) reported they were unable to live alone without any assistance at six weeks from start of illness. 16.9% reported being unable to work solely due to COVID-19 illness. 37.0% reported loss of income due to illness, and 64.4% said they were unable to perform usual activities/duties. Acute systems clustered broadly into two groups: a majority cluster (n = 2235, 88%) with cardiopulmonary predominant symptoms, and a minority cluster (n = 305, 12%) with multisystem symptoms. Similarly, ongoing symptoms broadly clustered in two groups; a majority cluster (n = 2243, 88.8%) exhibiting mainly cardiopulmonary, cognitive symptoms and exhaustion, and a minority cluster (n = 283, 11.2%) exhibiting more multisystem symptoms. Belonging to the more severe multisystem cluster was associated with more severe functional impact, lower income, younger age, being female, worse baseline health, and inadequate rest in the first two weeks of the illness, with no major differences in the cluster patterns when restricting analysis to the lab-confirmed subgroup. CONCLUSION: This is an exploratory survey of Long Covid characteristics. Whilst this is a non-representative population sample, it highlights the heterogeneity of persistent symptoms, and the significant functional impact of prolonged illness following confirmed or suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection. To study prevalence, predictors and prognosis, research is needed in a representative population sample using standardised case definitions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cluster Analysis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Self Report , Stress, Physiological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
J Med Virol ; 94(3): 971-978, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718360

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the persistence and factors associated with sleep disturbances among COVID-19 patients with a history of sleep disturbances 2 months after discharge from the hospital. A total of 400 patients admitted at Dhaka Medical College Hospital during July and August were diagnosed as suffering from sleep disturbances during their hospital stay using a standardized scale. They were followed up 2 months later through telephone, and a total of 322 participants were interviewed (excluding 63 nonresponders and five deceased) regarding the persistence of disturbances in sleep through a structured questionnaire. Patient demographic, clinical, and epidemiological data including history regarding in-hospital sleep disturbance were retrieved from hospital treatment sheets. Results revealed, 35% of study participants (n = 113) were still experiencing symptoms of sleep disturbances during the interview by telephone. Age (p = 0.015), diabetes mellitus (relative risk [RR]: 1.21; confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.42, p = 0.022), on admission SPO2 (p = 0.009), C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.025), serum ferritin (p = 0.014), and d-dimer (p = 0.030) were independently associated with sleep disturbances among participants (p < 0.05). Binary and fitting logistic regression through repeated K folds cross-validation revealed 1.65 (CI: 1.02-2.66), 1.07 (CI: 1.01-1.14), and 1.07 (CI: 1.00-1.15) times higher odds of persistence of sleep disturbances among patients with diabetes mellitus, increased neutrophil, and lymphocyte percentages, respectively. Findings of this study need to be validated and patients should be further followed up with more in-depth studies conducted 6 or 12 months after initial infection, possibly with the help of higher sample size and in-person interview.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(6): e28758, 2022 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708012

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Sleep disturbance is commonly noted after Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and is often caused by persistent discomfort after disease survival. Intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) has been shown to be effective in pain modulation owing to the influence of nociceptive signals in the peripheral nervous system. We investigated the application of ILIB on post-Oxford -AstraZeneca vaccination GBS and evaluated its effect on sleep quality. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 48-year-old woman was subsequently diagnosed with GBS after Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccination. The patient was discharged after a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin administration. However, 1 week after discharge, the previously relieved symptoms flared with accompanying sleep disturbance. DIAGNOSIS AND INTERVENTIONS: The patient was diagnosed with post-vaccination GBS, and persistent pain and sleep disturbances persisted after disease survival. ILIB was performed. OUTCOMES: We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index before and after intravascular laser irradiation. There was a marked improvement in the sleep duration, efficiency, and overall sleep quality. The initial score was 12 out of 21 and the final score was 7 out of 21. LESSONS: We found that ILIB was effective in pain modulation in post-vaccination GBS and significantly improved sleep quality.


Subject(s)
ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/adverse effects , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/chemically induced , Low-Level Light Therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19/administration & dosage , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Pain , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects
14.
Clin Ter ; 173(1): 88-90, 2022 Feb 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687410

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by social interaction and communication deficits and restricted, repetitive interests and behaviors (1). It is very common for children with ASD to present with several comorbidities, including sleep disorders. During the Covid-19 pandemic, children with ASD have been particularly at risk of adverse effects because of their difficulties in adapting to changes in daily habits and routines. METHODS AND AIM: Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate sleep habits during the Covid-19 pandemic by administering the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) to parents. RESULTS: Twenty-five children of 28 (89.3%) had a score above 41 during the pandemic. Of these, 11 children also had clinically signifi-cant scores before the pandemic. DISCUSSION: Our data confirm that sleep disturbances have been very common in autistic children during the Covid-19 pandemic and suggest new considerations. In particular, in our clinical sample, sleep habits seemed to improve or not change significantly during the Covid-19 pandemic in a population with a high prevalence of cli-nically significant sleep disturbances. These data confirm that in this particular context, a supportive environment (family, parent training, tele-rehabilitation) is very important for autistic people and a predicta-ble routine can help prevent stress, anxiety, and behavioral problems.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 121(12): 119-122, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629489

ABSTRACT

Healthy sleep is necessary to ensure the stability of the body's homeostasis, the consistency of immunological reactions, the optimal functioning of internal organs, the nervous system, and cognitive functions. The patterns of changes in circadian rhythms have been studied in many diseases, however, SARS-CoV-2 infection is a new reality, and the basic mechanisms of the body's functioning in this pathology require in-depth study. Despite the complexity of analytical work in a pandemic, experience in diagnosing COVID-19 has already been accumulated, treatment algorithms have been developed in various clinical situations, and vaccines have been developed. The least studied issues are the long-term consequences of COVID-19. At the same time, there is every reason to believe that patients need long-term rehabilitation in the «postcovid period¼ of SARS-CoV-2, including due to damage to the nervous system. Analysis of publications, from descriptions of clinical cases to literature reviews, allows us to accumulate empirical experience, which will make it possible in the future to establish markers of prognosis of the disease for effective prevention of long-term consequences. The results of current prospective studies draw attention to the presence of dyssomnias and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome not only as a frequent consequence of the postponed coronavirus infection, but also as a factor that significantly worsens the prognosis in the acute period of the disease. It has been repeatedly established that sleep deprivation adversely affects the body's resistance, including to SARS-CoV-2, and requires adjustment to improve the prognosis in the acute and long-term periods of the disease in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
16.
In Vivo ; 36(1): 325-329, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594965

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with malignant gliomas are scheduled for radiochemotherapy, which may cause emotional distress associated with sleep problems. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of such sleep problems in these patients and identify risk factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fifty-seven patients scheduled for radiochemotherapy for grade II-IV gliomas were retrospectively investigated for pre-treatment sleep problems. Fifteen characteristics were evaluated including temporal relation to COVID-19 pandemic, age, gender, performance status, comorbidity, (family) history of malignancies, distress score, emotional problems, physical problems, practical problems, involved sites, glioma grade, upfront surgery, and corticosteroids. RESULTS: Nineteen patients stated pre-treatment sleep problems (prevalence=66.7%). Significant associations with sleep problems were found for female gender (p=0.023), presence of emotional problems (p=0.006), and ≥4 physical problems (p<0.001). A trend was found for distress scores ≥5 (p=0.077). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of sleep problems was high. Risk factors were determined that can be used to identify patients who likely benefit from psychological support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glioma , Sleep Wake Disorders , Chemoradiotherapy , Female , Glioma/complications , Glioma/drug therapy , Glioma/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
17.
Sleep Health ; 8(2): 175-182, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586497

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE/DESIGN: Cross-sectional study to examine the determinants of sleep health among postpartum women during the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City (NYC). SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: A subset of participants recruited as part of the COVID-19 Mother Baby Outcomes (COMBO) cohort at Columbia University (N = 62 non-Hispanic White, N = 17 African American, N = 107 Hispanic). MEASUREMENTS: Data on maternal sleep, COVID-19 infection during pregnancy, sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological factors were collected via questionnaire at 4 months postpartum. Self-reported subjective sleep quality, latency, duration, efficiency, disturbances, and daytime dysfunction were examined as categorical variables (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]). Associations between sleep variables and COVID-19 status, time of the pandemic, sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological factors were estimated via independent multivariable regressions. RESULTS: Mothers who delivered between May-December 2020, who delivered after the NYC COVID-19 peak, experienced worse sleep latency, disturbances and global sleep health compared to those who delivered March-April 2020, the peak of the pandemic. Maternal depression, stress and COVID-19-related post-traumatic stress were associated with all sleep domains except for sleep efficiency. Maternal perception of infant's sleep as a problem was associated with worse global PSQI score, subjective sleep quality, duration, and efficiency. Compared to non-Hispanic White, Hispanic mothers reported worse global PSQI scores, sleep latency, duration and efficiency, but less daytime dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide crucial information about sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological factors contributing to sleep health in the postpartum period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , New York City/epidemiology , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Sleep Wake Disorders/ethnology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 63: 125-130, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525916

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Sleep disturbances in childhood are an important pediatrics problem because of their influence on children's health and their strong correlation with behavior problems. The aim of the present study was to explore sleep disturbances during the COVID-19 pandemic in school-age children. DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey design was used for data collection. From 1 to 15 February 2021, the study utilized snowball sampling techniques to gather data through an online survey. Parents of 1040 6-12-year-old schoolchildren completed the Socio-demographic Information Questionnaire and the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was employed to pinpoint factors connected to sleep disturbances. RESULTS: The prevalence of sleep disturbances among 6-12-year-old children during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey was 55.5%. The most common sleep disturbances were bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, and sleep duration. The children's ages, family relationships, and eating habits were linked to their sleep disturbances. Moreover, our results indicated that sleep disturbances were more common in the children of parents who felt helpless, apprehensive, and frightened during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Our work showed that the prevalence of sleep disturbances among school-aged children during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey was quite high. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Parents who are worried that their child is sleeping too much or too little should consult their healthcare provider for assessment of a probable sleep disturbance. School nurses should be educated children and their parents about the importance of enough sleep and factors that contribute to inadequate sleep among children during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
19.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2134803, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516698

ABSTRACT

Importance: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 is associated with fatigue and sleep problems long after the acute phase of COVID-19. In addition, there are concerns of SARS-CoV-2 infection causing psychiatric illness; however, evidence of a direct effect is inconclusive. Objective: To assess risk of risk of incident or repeat psychiatric illness, fatigue, or sleep problems following SARS-CoV-2 infection and to analyze changes according to demographic subgroups. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study assembled matched cohorts using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink Aurum, a UK primary care registry of 11 923 499 individuals aged 16 years or older. Patients were followed-up for up to 10 months, from February 1 to December 9, 2020. Individuals with less than 2 years of historical data or less than 1 week follow-up were excluded. Individuals with positive results on a SARS-CoV-2 test without prior mental illness or with anxiety or depression, psychosis, fatigue, or sleep problems were matched with up to 4 controls based on sex, general practice, and year of birth. Controls were individuals who had negative SARS-CoV-2 test results. Data were analyzed from January to July 2021. Exposure: SARS-CoV-2 infection, determined via polymerase chain reaction testing. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cox proportional hazard models estimated the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result and subsequent psychiatric morbidity (depression, anxiety, psychosis, or self-harm), sleep problems, fatigue, or psychotropic prescribing. Models adjusted for comorbidities, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index. Results: Of 11 923 105 eligible individuals (6 011 020 [50.4%] women and 5 912 085 [49.6%] men; median [IQR] age, 44 [30-61] years), 232 780 individuals (2.0%) had positive result on a SARS-CoV-2 test. After applying selection criteria, 86 922 individuals were in the matched cohort without prior mental illness, 19 020 individuals had prior anxiety or depression, 1036 individuals had psychosis, 4152 individuals had fatigue, and 4539 individuals had sleep problems. After adjusting for observed confounders, there was an association between positive SARS-CoV-2 test results and psychiatric morbidity (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.66-2.02), fatigue (aHR, 5.98; 95% CI, 5.33-6.71), and sleep problems (aHR, 3.16; 95% CI, 2.64-3.78). However, there was a similar risk of incident psychiatric morbidity for those with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test results (aHR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.65-1.77) and a larger increase associated with influenza (aHR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.55-5.75). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of individuals registered at an English primary care practice during the pandemic, there was consistent evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with increased risk of fatigue and sleep problems. However, the results from the negative control analysis suggest that unobserved confounding may be responsible for at least some of the positive association between COVID-19 and psychiatric morbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/etiology , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep , Adult , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , England/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Primary Health Care , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/etiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(9)2020 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456322

ABSTRACT

Poor sleep quality is a common concern and a troublesome symptom among patients suffering from fibromyalgia. The purpose of this review was to identify and describe the available patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) of sleep quality validated in adult people diagnosed with fibromyalgia. The COSMIN and PRISMA recommendations were followed. An electronic systematized search in the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science was carried out. Validation studies of PROMs of sleep quality in fibromyalgia published in English or Spanish were included. The selection of the studies was developed through a peer review process through the online software "COVIDENCE". The quality of the studies was assessed using the COSMIN Risk of Bias checklist. A total of 5 PROMs were found validated in patients with fibromyalgia: (1) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), (2) Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS), (3) Sleep Quality Numeric Rating Scale (SQ-NRS), (4) Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale (MOS-SS), and (5) Fibromyalgia Sleep Diary (FSD). The quality of the evidence was very good and the quality of the results ranged from moderate to high. All the included PROMs, except for the FSD, showed adequate psychometric properties and, therefore, are valid and reliable tools for assessing sleep quality in the context of FM. However, none of the studies analyzed all the psychometric properties of the included PROMs as established in the COSMIN guidelines, highlighting that this is a potential field of research for future investigations.


Subject(s)
Depressive Disorder, Major , Fibromyalgia , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Female , Fibromyalgia/complications , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , Male , Psychometrics , Quality of Life , Reproducibility of Results , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
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