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1.
Neurol Sci ; 43(4): 2241-2251, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636655

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: From the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers had to face unprecedented emergency needs associated with an extraordinary amount of psychological distress. In this cross-sectional multicenter study, we investigated sleep disturbances, and the level of anxiety and depression among the healthcare and non-healthcare staff of three hospitals in Milan (Italy) during the COVID-19 outbreak. Moreover, we explored potential predisposing factors for affective symptoms and poor sleep. METHODS: Between June and July 2020, we administered an online questionnaire to evaluate the presence of sleep disorders (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), insomnia (Sleep Condition Indicator), anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II). We used univariate and multivariate analysis to evaluate the association between the personal conditions and sleep and affective disorders. RESULTS: The 964 participants reported high rates of sleep disorders (80.3%)-mainly insomnia (30.5%)-anxiety (69.7%), and depression (32.8%). The multivariate analysis showed a strong association of sleep disorders, especially insomnia, with female gender (p = 0.004), divorced marital status (p = 0.015), self-isolation (p = 0.037), and chronic diseases (p = 0.003). Anxiety was significantly associated with teleworking (p = 0.001), while depressive symptoms were associated with self-isolation (p = 0.028), modified work schedules (p = 0.03), and chronic diseases (p = 0.027). CONCLUSION: In hospital workers, the high prevalence of sleep and psychiatric symptoms during the COVID-19 outbreak appears to be determined mainly by modifications of personal or work habits. Teleworking was associated with increased anxiety. An accurate planning of hospital activities and a psychological support are needed to prevent and manage sleep and mental disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology
3.
Bull Menninger Clin ; 85(3): 254-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470682

ABSTRACT

Sleep problems among frontline medical staff during the COVID-19 epidemic require attention. A total of 249 frontline medical staff who were recruited to support Wuhan completed this cross-sectional study. A web-based questionnaire about insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue was used to assess mental health status. The prevalence of sleep disorders among frontline medical staff was 50.6%. More time spent in Wuhan and a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue were associated with a higher risk of insomnia. People who stayed in Wuhan for a long time with a history of insomnia, depression, anxiety, and fatigue symptoms might be at high risk of insomnia.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , China , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
4.
Anticancer Res ; 41(10): 5165-5169, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449417

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with prostate cancer receive definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy. This study aimed to identify the frequency of sleep disturbances and corresponding risk factors prior to radiation treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data of 48 patients assigned to local or loco-regional irradiation for prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed for pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances. Fifteen characteristics were analyzed including age, performance status, comorbidity, history of previous malignancy, distress score, (emotional, physical or practical) problems, prostate-specific antigen, primary tumor stage, Gleason-score, upfront androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), treatment volume, brachytherapy, and COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances were reported by 20.8% of patients and significantly associated with distress scores ≥4 (p<0.0001) and ≥3 physical problems (p=0.0001). Trends were found for Karnofsky performance score ≤80 (p=0.095), Gleason score 7b-9 (p=0.079), and ADT (p=0.067). CONCLUSION: Pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances were less common in prostate cancer patients than in other cancer patients. Risk factors were identified that can help identify patients requiring psychological support prior to radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Prostatic Neoplasms/psychology , Prostatic Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
5.
Anticancer Res ; 41(10): 5065-5069, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449416

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with head-and-neck cancer are scheduled for irradiation. This study was performed to determine the frequency of and risk factors for pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances in these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 103 patients with head-and-neck cancer scheduled for radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Eighteen characteristics were evaluated including timing of start of radiotherapy relative to COVID-19 pandemic; age; gender; Karnofsky performance score; Charlson comorbidity index; history of another malignancy; family history of malignancy; distress score; number of emotional, physical or practical problems; request for psychological support; tumor site and stage; upfront surgery; planned chemotherapy; and brachytherapy boost. RESULTS: The frequency of pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances was 42.7%. This was significantly associated with age ≤63 years (p=0.049), Karnofsky performance score ≤80 (p=0.002), Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 (p=0.005), history of another malignancy (p=0.012), emotional (p=0.001) or physical (p<0.001) problems, and request for psychological support (p=0.002). CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbances were frequent in patients assigned to radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer. Recognizing risk factors for sleep disturbance helps identify patients requiring psychological support.


Subject(s)
Head and Neck Neoplasms/psychology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16524, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360205

ABSTRACT

The aims of the current study were to identify factors associated with sleep disturbance and Coronavirus disease-19 related psychological distress (CPD), and to develop a conceptual model to verify the mediating effect of CPD on the association between social impact and sleep disturbance. This study recruited patients with schizophrenia. Factors associated with the level of sleep disturbance and CPD were identified using univariate linear regression, and further selected into a stepwise multivariate linear regression model. Using structural equation modeling, a mediation model was developed to test the mediating effect of CPD on the association between social impact and sleep disturbance. After estimating with the stepwise and bootstrap regression, higher levels of CPD were associated with higher levels of social anxiety and subjects without a regular diet. Sleep disturbance was associated with a higher level of social anxiety, a history of psychological trauma, chronic disease, and those who did not smoke. The final model confirmed the mediating effects of CPD; whereas, the direct effect from social impact to sleep disturbance did not reach statistical significance. The current study manifests the crucial role of CPD on the association between social impact and sleep disturbance, and timely intervention for CPD is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Psychological Distress , Schizophrenia/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Social Change , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Schizophrenic Psychology , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Taiwan/epidemiology
7.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(13): 4616-4626, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319964

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), as for symptomatology and presence of parafunctions and sleep disorders. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred fourteen subjects completed an online questionnaire, including Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), a temporomandibular screening and a specific item about the impact of such event on the psycho-physical side. Non-parametric tests - Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis - were performed to compare sex and age groups, as for PSS and "COVID-19 pandemic impact score (CpIS)", and the groups Improved/stationary and Worsened in symptomatology as for the "CpIS". Data of subjects undergoing gnathological therapy and not were compared, using Chi-squared test. Orofacial symptomatology values before and during pandemic were compared. The level of statistical significance was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: The most prevalent category of perceived stress was the one of "moderate stress". Participants on average attributed to the pandemic a medium-low impact. The reported symptomatology actually showed a significant negative trend only as for neck pain. The intensity of orofacial symptomatology during pandemic was lower than before. Differences between age groups were statistically significant, as for CpIS. Subjects belonging to the group Worsened in one or more fields examined - TMD symptoms, comorbidities, sleep disturbances and fatigue - reported a significantly higher CpIS (p<0.0001). Awake and sleep bruxism, dental grinding, alteration in the quality and quantity of sleep and fatigue increased. Gnathological therapy was not a protective factor. CONCLUSIONS: The most evident fact during pandemic was the increase of parafunctions and sleep disorders. The trend of symptoms was more variable and complex.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 130, 2021 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Measures to contain the Covid-19 pandemic led to significant lifestyle changes for children and adolescents mainly related to the closure of schools and recreational activities, reduced social interaction, and increased family concerns. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey of 78 questions investigating social determinants of health, mood changes, symptoms of anxiety, increase in sleep disorders and unusual repetitive movements was offered to parents living in Italy with children ≤18 years; including families of children with disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, chronic diseases, and specific learning disabilities. The survey was conducted on the Qualtrics platform 6 months after the beginning of the pandemic and distributed in hospitals and paediatricians' waiting rooms as well as through social networks. The primary outcomes were the increase in sleep disorders among children and adolescents. Possible risk factors were investigated through multivariable regression. RESULTS: Six thousand two hundred ten volunteer parents responded to the questions concerning mood changes, sleep disorders and unusual repetitive movements, and were included in the present study. The majority were female (91.8%) and Italian (97.0%). 72.7% answered that their children had become more nervous, worried, or sad (80.2% in children with learning disabilities); 77.6% reported feelings of loneliness and 69.3% more difficulties in children falling asleep, 30.2% in staying asleep, and 18.7% an increase in nightmares and/or sleep terrors. Statistical analysis identified socioeconomic status, parent's job loss, food insecurity, family attitude toward the pandemic, and children's mood swing, feelings of loneliness, or missing outdoor activities, as major risk factors for sleep disorders. CONCLUSION: The first Covid-19 lockdown impacted children's and adolescents' health through an increase in sleep disorders. In the following phases of the pandemic, this evidence may be useful to investigate and treat these disorders as well as make decisions about containment health policies concerning this age group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(18): e25391, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216693

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients suffer from anxiety, depression, and sleep disorder due to isolation treatment and other reasons. Whether life interventions can be an alternative therapy for COVID-19 patients, accompanied with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorder, is controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis and systematic review to evaluate the effects of life interventions on anxiety, depression, and sleep disorder in COVID-19 patients to provide some guidance for clinical application. METHODS: The randomized controlled trials related to the life intervention and COVID-19 from inception to February 2021 will be searched. The following databases are our focused areas: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and Wan Fang Database. Two investigators would independently screen the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extract data, and evaluate the risk of bias in the included studies. Meta-analysis was performed with RevMan 5.3 software. RESULTS: The results will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence for researchers in this subject area. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of our study will provide evidence for the judgment of whether life intervention is an effective intervention on COVID-19 patients. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020199802.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/prevention & control , Quality of Life , Research Design , Sleep Wake Disorders/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Systematic Reviews as Topic
10.
Am J Mens Health ; 15(2): 15579883211005617, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181068

ABSTRACT

Black Americans remain disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Emerging data suggests that employment in certain occupations (e.g., essential; frontline) may place individuals at higher-risk for contracting COVID-19. The current investigation examined how Black American fathers' COVID-19 perceived work risk was associated with their individual well-being (COVID-19 diagnosis; depressive and anxiety symptoms; sleep disturbance; sleep quality) as well as spillover into family contexts. Participants were 466 Black American fathers (M = 36.63; SD = 11.00) who completed online surveys in June-July 2020. Adjusted binomial logistic and multiple regressions were estimated to examine how fathers' work context was associated with COVID-19 health outcomes, psychological functioning, sleep health, and family stress. Descriptive analyses revealed that 32% of fathers reported a personal diagnosis of COVID-19 and 21% indicated that an immediate family member had been diagnosed. Adjusted binomial logistic regression analyses revealed that fathers working in higher-risk contexts for contracting COVID-19 had a greater odds ratio for both a personal (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.68) and an immediate family member diagnosis (OR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.52, 4.36). Working in a higher-risk context for contracting COVID-19 was associated with poorer psychological functioning, greater sleep disturbance, and higher levels of family discord. Findings suggest that Black fathers working in higher risk contexts may be at risk for COVID-19 exposure and infection. Further, this study indicates that these effects extend to their own well-being, including mental and sleep health as well as increased family stress.


Subject(s)
African Americans/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Fathers/psychology , Occupations , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Social Determinants of Health , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
11.
Neuropsychopharmacol Rep ; 41(2): 223-229, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171113

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of corona-associated anxiety and mental health disorder among Iranian dentists during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A study was conducted using online survey from May 2nd to 14th, 2020. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: demographic information, anxiety (18 questions), and general health (GH) (GHQ-28). Scoring system was based on Likert scale. The questionnaire was registered at Porsline website. Data were analyzed using t test and Pearson's correlation coefficient statistical tests. RESULTS: A total of 320 dentists from all over the country fully completed questionnaires. 42.5% of dentist had corona-associated anxiety and 32.5% out of them had mild severity and no severe anxiety was observed. 62.5% of dentists were nonpsychiatric according to GHQ-28, 35% had mild disorders in GH, and no one had severe GH disorders. There were significant relationships between gender, marital status, and family history of psychiatric disorders with GH status. There was a significant relationship between history of physical illness with corona-associated anxiety. There was a significant relationship between history of psychiatric disorders with corona-associated anxiety and GH status. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of corona-associated anxiety and mental disorders in dentists was moderate; by holding psychological workshops to maintain and strengthen the morale of dentists during the corona pandemic, along with teaching them the correct way to use personal protective equipment, while maintaining the mental health of dentists, we will help them return to work and provide dental services.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Dentists/statistics & numerical data , Depression/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Dentists/psychology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Psychosocial Functioning , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 17(2): 299-313, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115516

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: No systematic review or meta-analysis has yet been conducted to examine the impact of the pandemic on the prevalence of sleep problems among the general population, health care workers, or patients with COVID-19. Therefore, this systematic review was conducted to assess the impact and prevalence of sleep problems among those categories. METHODS: American Psychological Association PsycINFO, Cochrane, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EBSCOhost, EMBASE, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, ProQuest Medical, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science from November 1, 2019 to July 5, 2020 were used. Additionally, 5 preprints servers (medRxiv.org; preprints.org; psyarxiv.com; arXiv.org; biorxiv.org) were also searched for papers accepted after peer review but not yet published and indexed. There was no language restriction. The random-effect models meta-analysis model was used with the DerSimonian and Laird methodology. RESULTS: Forty-four papers, involving a total of 54,231 participants from 13 countries, were judged relevant and contributed to the systematic review and meta-analysis of sleep problems during COVID-19. The global pooled prevalence rate of sleep problems among all populations was 35.7% (95% confidence interval, 29.4-42.4%). Patients with COVID-19 appeared to be the most affected group, with a pooled rate of 74.8% (95% confidence interval, 28.7-95.6%). Health care workers and the general population had comparative rates of sleep problems, with rates of 36.0% (95% confidence interval, 21.1-54.2%) and 32.3% (95% confidence interval, 25.3-40.2%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of sleep problems during the COVID-19 pandemic is high and affects approximately 40% of people from the general and health care populations. Patients with active COVID-19 appeared to have a higher prevalence rates of sleep problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/physiopathology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(2): 1087-1096, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081346

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) suffer from anxiety, depression and sleep disorders due to isolation treatment, among other reasons. Whether non-drug interventions can be alternative therapies for COVID-19 patients with anxiety, depression and sleep disorders is controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis and systematic review to evaluate the effects of non-drug interventions on anxiety, depression and sleep in patients with COVID-19 to provide guidance for clinical application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched the following databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from December 2019 to July 2020: China Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP), Wanfang, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PubMed, MEDLINE and Embase. Two investigators independently screened the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and evaluated the risk of bias in the included studies. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan5.3 software. RESULTS: A total of 5 articles with 768 subjects were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that non-drug interventions can reduce anxiety [SMD=-1.40, 95% CI (-1.62, -1.17), p<0.00001] and depression [SMD=-1.22, 95% CI (-2.01, -0.43), p=0.002] scores in patients with COVID-19. Descriptive analysis indicated that non-drug interventions can improve the sleep status of COVID-19 patients. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the meta-analysis results were stable. Egger's test and Begg's test showed no publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis found that non-drug interventions can reduce the anxiety and depression scores of patients with COVID-19. Due to the limitations of this study, more high-quality studies are needed to verify the findings, especially the effect of non-drug interventions on improving the sleep status of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Early Medical Intervention/methods , Humans , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Treatment Outcome
14.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 80(2): 533-537, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073321

ABSTRACT

We explored the experience from caregivers of people with dementia (PwD) during mandatory confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. An online survey, which studied the perceptions of the main problems and consequences experienced during confinement, was answered by 106 family caregivers of PwD. Results showed that family caregivers of PwD experienced psychological problems, like anxiety, mood, sleep, or eating disorders during confinement and felt less supported when they had to handle challenging behaviors or offer meaningful activities. An innovative multi-tiered supportive approach is needed which considers a post-pandemic reality and ensures the continuity of quality care for PwD and their family careers.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Needs Assessment , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/psychology , Mood Disorders/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Social Isolation , Social Support , Spain
15.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S43-S52, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065048

ABSTRACT

The psychological effects of isolation have already been described in the literature (polar expeditions, submarines, prison). Nevertheless, the scale of confinement implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. In addition to reviewing the published studies, we need to anticipate the psychological problems that could arise during or at a distance from confinement. We have gone beyond the COVID-19 literature in order to examine the implications of the known consequences of confinement, like boredom, social isolation, stress, or sleep deprivation. Anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, suicidal or addictive behaviours, domestic violence are described effects of confinement, but the mechanisms of emergence of these disorders and their interrelationships remain to be studied. For example, what are the mechanisms of emergence of post-traumatic stress disorders in the context of confinement? We also remind the reader of points of vigilance to be kept in mind with regard to eating disorders and hallucinations. Hallucinations are curiously ignored in the literature on confinement, whereas a vast literature links social isolation and hallucinations. Due to the broad psychopathological consequences, we have to look for these various symptoms to manage them. We quickly summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches already in place, such as telemedicine, which is undergoing rapid development during the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Patient Isolation/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/etiology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Behavior, Addictive/etiology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , Boredom , COVID-19 , Child , Child Abuse , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Delivery of Health Care , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Domestic Violence/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/etiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , France , Hallucinations/etiology , Hallucinations/psychology , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Suicide/psychology , Telemedicine
16.
Psychol Health Med ; 26(1): 119-130, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066126

ABSTRACT

The study aimed to explore the effect of perceived stress of healthcare workers on anxiety and sleep level in intensive care units during corona virus pandemic. The research was conducted in descriptive and cross-sectional types. The study was conducted between April 2020 and July 2020 at Atatürk University Research Hospital and Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital. In the research, it was aimed to reach all the healthcare professionals (260) working in intensive care units without selecting a sample. The data was collected by using the personal information form prepared by the researchers in line with the literature, Perceived Stress Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Visual Analog Sleep Scale. Of the 210 participants, 75.4% were female, and 88.1% were nurses. The mean age of the participants was 27.04 ± 5.71 years, and 51.9% of the participants were 20-25 years old. The mean perceived stress, state anxiety, trait anxiety, and visual analog sleep scores were moderate and found as 29.9 ± 6.83, 43.09 ± 5.55, 46.15 ± 5.3, and 503.79 ± 134.24, respectively. In conclusion, a general picture of the psychological state of healthcare professionals in Turkey during the COVID-19 pandemic has been presented.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Turkey , Young Adult
19.
Psychol Health Med ; 26(1): 119-130, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024052

ABSTRACT

The study aimed to explore the effect of perceived stress of healthcare workers on anxiety and sleep level in intensive care units during corona virus pandemic. The research was conducted in descriptive and cross-sectional types. The study was conducted between April 2020 and July 2020 at Atatürk University Research Hospital and Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital. In the research, it was aimed to reach all the healthcare professionals (260) working in intensive care units without selecting a sample. The data was collected by using the personal information form prepared by the researchers in line with the literature, Perceived Stress Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Visual Analog Sleep Scale. Of the 210 participants, 75.4% were female, and 88.1% were nurses. The mean age of the participants was 27.04 ± 5.71 years, and 51.9% of the participants were 20-25 years old. The mean perceived stress, state anxiety, trait anxiety, and visual analog sleep scores were moderate and found as 29.9 ± 6.83, 43.09 ± 5.55, 46.15 ± 5.3, and 503.79 ± 134.24, respectively. In conclusion, a general picture of the psychological state of healthcare professionals in Turkey during the COVID-19 pandemic has been presented.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Turkey , Young Adult
20.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244717, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021674

ABSTRACT

The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to test whether a commercially available, mindfulness meditation mobile app, (i.e., Calm app), was effective in reducing fatigue (primary outcome), pre-sleep arousal, and daytime sleepiness (secondary outcomes) in adults with sleep disturbance (Insomnia Severity Index Score >10) as compared to a wait-list control group. Associations between the use of the Calm app (i.e., adherence to the intervention) and changes in sleep quality was also explored in the intervention group only. Adults with sleep disturbance were recruited (N = 640). Eligible and consenting participants (N = 263) were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 124) or a wait-list control (n = 139) group. Intervention participants were asked to meditate using the Calm app ≥10 minutes/day for eight weeks. Fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and pre-sleep arousal were assessed at baseline, mid- (4-weeks) and post-intervention (8-weeks) in both groups, whereas sleep quality was evaluated only in the intervention group. Findings from intent-to-treat analyses suggest the use of the Calm app for eight weeks significantly decreased daytime fatigue (p = .018) as well as daytime sleepiness (p = .003) and cognitive (p = .005) and somatic (p < .001) pre-sleep arousal as compared to the wait-list control group. Within the intervention group, use of the Calm app was associated with improvements in sleep quality (p < .001). This randomized controlled trial demonstrates that the Calm app can be used to treat fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and pre-sleep arousal in adults with sleep disturbance. Given that the Calm app is affordable and widely accessible, these data have implications for community level dissemination of a mobile app to improve sleep-related symptoms associated with sleep disturbance. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04045275.


Subject(s)
Meditation/psychology , Mindfulness/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Adult , Arousal/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
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