Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 25
Filter
1.
J Int Med Res ; 50(5): 3000605221097478, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832986

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Emergency psychological interventions are needed in patients with COVID-19. During the pandemic, psychological counseling services have been provided using online platforms to address adverse psychological impacts and symptoms in patients and the general population. We investigated the effects of telepsychotherapy on emotional well-being and psychological distress in patients affected by COVID-19. METHODS: Forty-five Sicilian patients who had contracted COVID-19 joined "Telecovid Sicilia" from March to June 2020. Participants completed self-assessment questionnaires and psychological testing to measure levels of anxiety, presence of depressive symptoms, and altered circadian rhythm with consequent sleep disorders and psychological distress. Individual telepsychotherapy services were provided for 1 hour, twice a week, for 16 sessions in total. RESULTS: We enrolled 45 patients (42.2% women). We found significant changes between baseline and the end of follow-up in all outcome measures, especially depression (χ2 (1) = 30.1; effect size [ES] = 0.82), anxiety (χ2 (1) = 37.4; ES = 0.91), and paranoid ideation (χ2 (1) = 5.6; ES = 0.35). The proportion of participants with sleep disorders decreased to 84.1% after intervention (χ2 (1) = 58.6; ES = 1.14). CONCLUSION: A telepsychotherapeutic approach showed promising effects on psychological symptoms, with significantly reduced patient anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Telemedicine , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Psychotherapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(6): e28758, 2022 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708012

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Sleep disturbance is commonly noted after Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and is often caused by persistent discomfort after disease survival. Intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) has been shown to be effective in pain modulation owing to the influence of nociceptive signals in the peripheral nervous system. We investigated the application of ILIB on post-Oxford -AstraZeneca vaccination GBS and evaluated its effect on sleep quality. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 48-year-old woman was subsequently diagnosed with GBS after Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccination. The patient was discharged after a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin administration. However, 1 week after discharge, the previously relieved symptoms flared with accompanying sleep disturbance. DIAGNOSIS AND INTERVENTIONS: The patient was diagnosed with post-vaccination GBS, and persistent pain and sleep disturbances persisted after disease survival. ILIB was performed. OUTCOMES: We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index before and after intravascular laser irradiation. There was a marked improvement in the sleep duration, efficiency, and overall sleep quality. The initial score was 12 out of 21 and the final score was 7 out of 21. LESSONS: We found that ILIB was effective in pain modulation in post-vaccination GBS and significantly improved sleep quality.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/chemically induced , Low-Level Light Therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Pain , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(9)2020 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456322

ABSTRACT

Poor sleep quality is a common concern and a troublesome symptom among patients suffering from fibromyalgia. The purpose of this review was to identify and describe the available patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) of sleep quality validated in adult people diagnosed with fibromyalgia. The COSMIN and PRISMA recommendations were followed. An electronic systematized search in the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science was carried out. Validation studies of PROMs of sleep quality in fibromyalgia published in English or Spanish were included. The selection of the studies was developed through a peer review process through the online software "COVIDENCE". The quality of the studies was assessed using the COSMIN Risk of Bias checklist. A total of 5 PROMs were found validated in patients with fibromyalgia: (1) Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), (2) Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS), (3) Sleep Quality Numeric Rating Scale (SQ-NRS), (4) Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale (MOS-SS), and (5) Fibromyalgia Sleep Diary (FSD). The quality of the evidence was very good and the quality of the results ranged from moderate to high. All the included PROMs, except for the FSD, showed adequate psychometric properties and, therefore, are valid and reliable tools for assessing sleep quality in the context of FM. However, none of the studies analyzed all the psychometric properties of the included PROMs as established in the COSMIN guidelines, highlighting that this is a potential field of research for future investigations.


Subject(s)
Depressive Disorder, Major , Fibromyalgia , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Female , Fibromyalgia/complications , Fibromyalgia/therapy , Humans , Male , Psychometrics , Quality of Life , Reproducibility of Results , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Sleep Med ; 91: 253-261, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313433

ABSTRACT

This chapter summarizes the known associations between COVID-19 and sleep dysfunction, including insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs syndrome and nightmares, and touches upon pandemic-related considerations for obstructive sleep apnea and continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Treatment strategies and management approaches are also briefly discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive , Sleep Wake Disorders , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/therapy , Humans , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/complications , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/epidemiology , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
6.
Sleep Med ; 91: 211-218, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201963

ABSTRACT

The sleep of millions has suffered during the global COVID-19 pandemic. Prevalence rates of 20-45% are reported globally for insomnia symptoms during the pandemic. Affected populations include the public and health care workers. A sleep deprived society faces the increased burden of COVID-related economic disruption, psychosocial problems, substance abuse, and suicide. Disordered sleep is not expected to disappear with control of infection, making interventions acutely necessary. The question becomes how to manage the sleep dysfunction during and after the pandemic. Depression and anxiety are prominent complaints during pandemic restrictions. Insomnia symptoms and fatigue continue even as mood improves in those who are in recovery from COVID-19 infection. Management of disturbed sleep and mental health is particularly needed in frontline health care workers. This overview describes 53 publications, as of February 2021, on disturbed sleep during the pandemic, treatment studies on COVID-related sleep disturbance, and need to rely on current treatment guidelines for common sleep disorders. The available research during the first year of COVID-19 has generally described symptoms of poor sleep rather than addressing treatment strategies. It covers digital cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) for the public and frontline workers, recognizing the need of greater acceptance and efficacy of controlled trials of CBT for affected groups. Recommendations based on a tiered public health model are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
7.
Psychol Health Med ; 27(2): 333-342, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193666

ABSTRACT

Fangcang hospitals, as tentative hospitals built to treat a huge turnover of patients with mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections, have played a pivotal role to slow down the pandemic spread in China in 2020. However, anxiety and sleep disorders remain tough to address during the treatments. In this study, group psychological intervention in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation exercises were conducted in the trial group for the patients with mild COVID-19 infections in a Fangcang Hospital to mitigate the patients' anxiety and sleep disorders, while conventional nursing methods were done in the control group, with 70 randomly picked patients in each group. Effects were assessed through questionnaire method using state anxiety questionnaire (SAI) and Pittsburgh sleep quality index scale (PQSI) rating investigation. Results showed that both SAI and PSQI scores of the trial group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P < 0.05). The SAI scores of the trial group and the control group were 38.5 ± 13.2 and 45.8 ± 10.4 points (t = 3.600, P < 0.001), respectively, and the PSQI scores were 5.6 ± 3.0 and 7.1 ± 3.0 points (t = 2.982, P < 0.01), respectively. Our methods have significant advantages over conventional nursing methods to mitigate anxiety and sleep disorders for the patients with mild COVID-19 infections in the Fangcang Hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , China/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Exercise Therapy , Hospitals , Humans , Psychosocial Intervention , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
8.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 17(5): 1103-1107, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089142

ABSTRACT

NONE: The COVID-19 pandemic led to widespread use of telemedicine and highlighted its importance in improving access to sleep care and advocating for sleep health. This update incorporates the lessons learned from such widespread utilization of telehealth to build on the American Academy of Sleep Medicine's 2015 position paper on the use of telemedicine for diagnosing and treating sleep disorders. Important key factors in this update include an emphasis on quality and value, privacy and safety, health advocacy through sleep telemedicine, and future directions.


Subject(s)
Sleep Wake Disorders , Telemedicine , Academies and Institutes , COVID-19 , Humans , Sleep Medicine Specialty , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
9.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(2): 1087-1096, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081346

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) suffer from anxiety, depression and sleep disorders due to isolation treatment, among other reasons. Whether non-drug interventions can be alternative therapies for COVID-19 patients with anxiety, depression and sleep disorders is controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis and systematic review to evaluate the effects of non-drug interventions on anxiety, depression and sleep in patients with COVID-19 to provide guidance for clinical application. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched the following databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from December 2019 to July 2020: China Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database (VIP), Wanfang, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PubMed, MEDLINE and Embase. Two investigators independently screened the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted data and evaluated the risk of bias in the included studies. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan5.3 software. RESULTS: A total of 5 articles with 768 subjects were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that non-drug interventions can reduce anxiety [SMD=-1.40, 95% CI (-1.62, -1.17), p<0.00001] and depression [SMD=-1.22, 95% CI (-2.01, -0.43), p=0.002] scores in patients with COVID-19. Descriptive analysis indicated that non-drug interventions can improve the sleep status of COVID-19 patients. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the meta-analysis results were stable. Egger's test and Begg's test showed no publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis found that non-drug interventions can reduce the anxiety and depression scores of patients with COVID-19. Due to the limitations of this study, more high-quality studies are needed to verify the findings, especially the effect of non-drug interventions on improving the sleep status of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Early Medical Intervention/methods , Humans , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Treatment Outcome
10.
Appl Nurs Res ; 59: 151412, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The profession of nurses involves exposure to harmful agents. Despite numerous international studies on the occurrence of sleep disorders in nurses, most studies lacked an assessment of the dependence on the occurrence of the situation causing fear and anxiety which is a highly contagious. AIM: Determining the relationship between the occurrence of sleep disorders and socio-demographic variables of medical personnel during the COVID-19 epidemic. DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study conducted online involving 336 health professionals. RESULTS: Insomnia among staff was determined at the level of Subthreshold insomnia and Clinical insomnia (moderate severity). Suspicion or confirmed COVID-19 had an effect on the occurrence of sleep disorders in the study group of medical personnel. CONCLUSION: Taking into account the statistical error of 6%, the sleep disorders concern about 40% of professionally active nurses and midwives in Poland. Worsening of insomnia was observed in people with the possibility of contact with a patient with COVID-19 in the workplace. Insomnia was more common in respondents over 25 years of age. Psychosocial interventions are needed to help healthcare staff better respond to COVID-19 and future epidemics.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
11.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 80(2): 533-537, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073321

ABSTRACT

We explored the experience from caregivers of people with dementia (PwD) during mandatory confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. An online survey, which studied the perceptions of the main problems and consequences experienced during confinement, was answered by 106 family caregivers of PwD. Results showed that family caregivers of PwD experienced psychological problems, like anxiety, mood, sleep, or eating disorders during confinement and felt less supported when they had to handle challenging behaviors or offer meaningful activities. An innovative multi-tiered supportive approach is needed which considers a post-pandemic reality and ensures the continuity of quality care for PwD and their family careers.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Needs Assessment , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/psychology , Mood Disorders/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Social Isolation , Social Support , Spain
12.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244717, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021674

ABSTRACT

The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to test whether a commercially available, mindfulness meditation mobile app, (i.e., Calm app), was effective in reducing fatigue (primary outcome), pre-sleep arousal, and daytime sleepiness (secondary outcomes) in adults with sleep disturbance (Insomnia Severity Index Score >10) as compared to a wait-list control group. Associations between the use of the Calm app (i.e., adherence to the intervention) and changes in sleep quality was also explored in the intervention group only. Adults with sleep disturbance were recruited (N = 640). Eligible and consenting participants (N = 263) were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 124) or a wait-list control (n = 139) group. Intervention participants were asked to meditate using the Calm app ≥10 minutes/day for eight weeks. Fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and pre-sleep arousal were assessed at baseline, mid- (4-weeks) and post-intervention (8-weeks) in both groups, whereas sleep quality was evaluated only in the intervention group. Findings from intent-to-treat analyses suggest the use of the Calm app for eight weeks significantly decreased daytime fatigue (p = .018) as well as daytime sleepiness (p = .003) and cognitive (p = .005) and somatic (p < .001) pre-sleep arousal as compared to the wait-list control group. Within the intervention group, use of the Calm app was associated with improvements in sleep quality (p < .001). This randomized controlled trial demonstrates that the Calm app can be used to treat fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and pre-sleep arousal in adults with sleep disturbance. Given that the Calm app is affordable and widely accessible, these data have implications for community level dissemination of a mobile app to improve sleep-related symptoms associated with sleep disturbance. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04045275.


Subject(s)
Meditation/psychology , Mindfulness/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Adult , Arousal/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(47): e23185, 2020 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006268

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on negative mood and sleep quality in Coronavirus Pneumonia (COVID-19) patients.COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease, and there is still uncertainty about when the outbreak will be contained and the effectiveness of treatments. Considering that this disease is highly contagious, patients need to be treated in isolation. This may lead to psychological symptoms such as anxiety and depression, and even sleep problems.This study is a clinical observation study.Participants included 79 COVID-19 patients admitted to a designated hospital for COVID-19 patients in Wuhan from February to March, 2020. Patients were selected and assigned to the control group and the observation group according to their wishes, with 40 and 39 cases in each group, respectively. The control group received routine treatment and nursing, and the observation group received progressive muscle relaxation training, in addition to the routine treatment and nursing. We compared scores of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Scale (PSQI), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) before and after the intervention.There was no significant difference in PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 scores between the control group and the observation group before the intervention (P > .05). After the intervention, the difference in scores of PSQI, GAD-7, and PHQ-9 in the 2 groups were statistically significant (P < .05).Progressive muscle relaxation training can significantly reduce anxiety and depression and improve sleep quality in COVID-19 patients during isolation treatment.Progressive muscle relaxation training was shown to improve the treatment effect of patients and is worthy of clinical promotion.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Autogenic Training/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Sleep/physiology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/therapy , Depression/virology , Emotions/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
14.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(3-4): 527-535, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adolescents' anxiety and depression during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak cannot be ignored. In public health crisis events, adolescents are prone to negative psychological problems, such as anxiety and depression. Hence, this research focuses on the use of reasonable and efficient methods to intervene in adolescents' psychological problems during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: From February to April 2020, we conducted an anonymous online survey on a total of 1,200 adolescents in the provinces of Hunan and Guangxi in China. Moreover, we randomly divided a total of 150 middle school students with anxiety scores greater than 50 and volunteered to participate in the intervention experiment into control and intervention groups, with 75 members in each group. On the basis of the proposed routine treatment, we conducted 8 weeks of model 328-based peer education intervention in the intervention group. RESULTS: After the intervention, the self-rating anxiety scale scores (SAS) of the intervention group are better than those of the control group (P<0.001). Moreover, the self-rating depression scale (SDS) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group (P<0.001) than on the control group. Finally, the total Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) scores of both groups are reduced, but the effect is more significant on the intervention group than on the control group (P=0.001 and <0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Model 328-based peer education intervention can significantly reduce the level of anxiety and depression in adolescents and improve their sleep quality.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , China , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy
17.
Sleep Med Clin ; 15(3S): e1-e7, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739928

ABSTRACT

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, few pediatric sleep medicine clinicians routinely engaged in telemedicine visits because thorough examinations were difficult to perform; there was lack of consistent reimbursement; and many clinicians were busy with their in-office practices. This article reviews how telemedicine has been explored in pediatric sleep medicine prior to the pandemic, current applications of telemedicine, challenges, and reimagining pediatric sleep within the realm of telemedicine.


Subject(s)
Pediatrics , Sleep Medicine Specialty , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Coronavirus Infections , Humans , Otolaryngology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Polysomnography , Referral and Consultation , Restless Legs Syndrome/diagnosis , Restless Legs Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/diagnosis , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/therapy , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/diagnosis , Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/therapy , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/therapy
18.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 77(1): 113-125, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A system of photosensitive retinal ganglion cells provides 'non-visual' information on the circadian sequences of light to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which, as the 'master clock', synchronizes the chronobiological mechanisms of all the biological clocks. Damage to SCN structure alters circadian behavioral and hormonal rhythms and interferes with a regular sleep-wake pattern. Several studies have shown that, in aging and in Alzheimer's disease (AD), circadian rhythms change their synchronization with the environment and behavior loses sync with light. OBJECTIVE: The current overview aims to examine research studies showing the effect of bright light therapy (BLT) on sleep disorders and sleep-wake patterns in AD. METHODS: A literature search was conducted, taking into consideration the relevant studies over the last 20 years. Fifteen studies have been thorough: seven followed an environmental-architectural approach and eight followed a treatment devices approach. RESULTS: Studies agree in considering BLT as a promising non-pharmacological intervention to compensate for circadian rhythm alterations and they support the need for standardized protocols that allow a comparison between multicenter studies. CONCLUSION: Interestingly, in an attempt to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, health authorities have forced the population to stay home. Therefore, AD people are not currently able to enjoy exposure to sunlight. It is predictable that they may experience an exacerbation of circadian disturbances and that the BLT can be an effective response to prevent such exacerbation.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/therapy , Phototherapy/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/physiopathology , Sunlight , Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
19.
Sleep Med ; 75: 21-26, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-694867

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders may exacerbate many physical and mental health conditions, causing difficulty function in a healthcare setting. Workers screening for the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infection have a high risk of not only occupational exposure to the virus but also sleep disorders. However, the job-related factors associated with reduced sleep quality remain unclear. METHODS: All healthcare workers temporarily scheduled to screen the 2019-nCoV patients were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire that included questions on demographics, job-related factors, and sleep quality as assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Sleep quality was assessed over a one-month follow-up period. RESULTS: A total of 116 doctors and 99 nurses were recruited for this study. The total scheduled work time was 14.78 ± 6.69 days during follow-up. Some job-related factors, such as number of work days, years of work experience, and subjective psychological stress, were associated with changes in the PSQI score. During the study, some workers tried out cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for sleep disorders using methods that were available online and easily accessible. Adopting online CBT was shown to be associated with scores of components of sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep disturbance (ß = -0.152, P = 0.01; ß = -0.175, P = 0.008; and ß = -0.158, P = 0.011, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers involved in screening for 2019-nCoV experienced reduced sleep quality, and a reasonable work schedule may help with maintaining sleep quality. In addition, interventions for healthcare workers should target self-help sleep assistance.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/psychology , Sleep , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mass Screening , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
20.
Sleep Med ; 74: 18-24, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-653706

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic is a large-scale public health emergency that likely precipitated sleep disturbances in the community. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of sleep disturbances during the early phase of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This web-based cross-sectional study recruited 1138 Hong Kong adults using convenience sampling over a two-week period from 6th April 2020. The survey collected data on sleep disturbances, mood, stress, stock of infection control supplies, perceived risk of being infected by COVID-19, and sources for acquiring COVID-19 information. The participants were asked to compare their recent sleep and sleep before the outbreak. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) was used to assess their current insomnia severity. Prevalence was weighted according to 2016 population census. RESULTS: The weighted prevalence of worsened sleep quality, difficulty in sleep initiation, and shortened sleep duration since the outbreak were 38.3%, 29.8%, and 29.1%, respectively. The prevalence of current insomnia (ISI score of ≥10) was 29.9%. Insufficient stock of masks was significantly associated with worsened sleep quality, impaired sleep initiation, shortened sleep duration, and current insomnia in multivariate logistic regression (adjusted OR = 1.57, 1.72, 1.99, and 1.96 respectively, all p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: A high proportion of people in Hong Kong felt that their sleep had worsened since the COVID-19 outbreak. Insufficient stock of masks was one of the risk factors that were associated with sleep disturbances. Adequate and stable supply of masks may play an important role to maintain the sleep health in the Hong Kong general population during a pandemic outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Urban Population , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Urban Population/trends , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL