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2.
J Trop Pediatr ; 67(4)2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, its terrible infectiousness has caused great panic, anxiety and poor sleep quality to the vulnerable adolescent populations. METHODS: This cross-sectional online survey recruited 10 569 Chinese junior and senior high school adolescents during 31 January to 9 February 2020. Basic socio-demographic information, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Fear of negative evaluation (FNE) were included in the survey. The χ2 and logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors correlated with poor sleep quality. RESULTS: The prevalence of poor sleep quality was 18.6% in the Chinese adolescent population. The average score of PSQI was 3.39 (SD = 2.64), which was significantly correlated with scores for anxiety (r = 0.50, p < 0.01), and FNE (r = 0.36, p < 0.01). Adjusted logistic regression indicated that gender (females) and education (senior high school) were associated with poor sleep quality, while living in Hubei Province and time spent on the COVID-19 information were inversely associated with poor sleep quality. Having a family member or friend infected/suspected and spending time on electronics were associated with higher odds of having poor sleep quality. Adolescents with anxiety were 8 times, and those with FNE were three times more likely than ones without anxiety or FNE to have poor sleep quality. In addition, the number of meals, exercise time and diet quality were also significantly associated with sleep quality. (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep quality was common during the COVID-19 pandemic in Chinese adolescents. Understanding several factors associated with the poor sleep quality will offer some important insights into determining potential interventions to improve sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2134803, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516698

ABSTRACT

Importance: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 is associated with fatigue and sleep problems long after the acute phase of COVID-19. In addition, there are concerns of SARS-CoV-2 infection causing psychiatric illness; however, evidence of a direct effect is inconclusive. Objective: To assess risk of risk of incident or repeat psychiatric illness, fatigue, or sleep problems following SARS-CoV-2 infection and to analyze changes according to demographic subgroups. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study assembled matched cohorts using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink Aurum, a UK primary care registry of 11 923 499 individuals aged 16 years or older. Patients were followed-up for up to 10 months, from February 1 to December 9, 2020. Individuals with less than 2 years of historical data or less than 1 week follow-up were excluded. Individuals with positive results on a SARS-CoV-2 test without prior mental illness or with anxiety or depression, psychosis, fatigue, or sleep problems were matched with up to 4 controls based on sex, general practice, and year of birth. Controls were individuals who had negative SARS-CoV-2 test results. Data were analyzed from January to July 2021. Exposure: SARS-CoV-2 infection, determined via polymerase chain reaction testing. Main Outcomes and Measures: Cox proportional hazard models estimated the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result and subsequent psychiatric morbidity (depression, anxiety, psychosis, or self-harm), sleep problems, fatigue, or psychotropic prescribing. Models adjusted for comorbidities, ethnicity, smoking, and body mass index. Results: Of 11 923 105 eligible individuals (6 011 020 [50.4%] women and 5 912 085 [49.6%] men; median [IQR] age, 44 [30-61] years), 232 780 individuals (2.0%) had positive result on a SARS-CoV-2 test. After applying selection criteria, 86 922 individuals were in the matched cohort without prior mental illness, 19 020 individuals had prior anxiety or depression, 1036 individuals had psychosis, 4152 individuals had fatigue, and 4539 individuals had sleep problems. After adjusting for observed confounders, there was an association between positive SARS-CoV-2 test results and psychiatric morbidity (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.66-2.02), fatigue (aHR, 5.98; 95% CI, 5.33-6.71), and sleep problems (aHR, 3.16; 95% CI, 2.64-3.78). However, there was a similar risk of incident psychiatric morbidity for those with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test results (aHR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.65-1.77) and a larger increase associated with influenza (aHR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.55-5.75). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of individuals registered at an English primary care practice during the pandemic, there was consistent evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with increased risk of fatigue and sleep problems. However, the results from the negative control analysis suggest that unobserved confounding may be responsible for at least some of the positive association between COVID-19 and psychiatric morbidity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/etiology , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep , Adult , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , England/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Primary Health Care , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/etiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology
4.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 384-390, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513255

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To measure the Saudi population's sleep quality during the lockdown of COVID-19. METHODS: An internet-based questionnaire that was performed during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Saudi population over 2 weeks from April 1 to April 15, 2020. We used the instant messaging application WhatsApp and Twitter to reach the targeted population. Saudi citizens and non-Saudi residents who can read and understand the questionnaire were recruited. Data were analyzed using Stata and SPSS. RESULTS: A total of 790 responses were included. The majority of participants were the Saudi population 735 (92.9%). The prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality were 54.4% and 55.5%, respectively. Saudi citizenship was associated with longer sleep duration (p=0.031). Female gender and being married were associated with worse global PSQI, sleep quality, sleep distribution, sleep latency, and daytime dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Saudi population had a high prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality. Routine monitoring of the psychological impact of life-threatening outbreaks and the adoption of effective early mental health actions should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Public Policy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Sleep Latency , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(11): e2134241, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1508587

ABSTRACT

Importance: The influence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and sleep-related hypoxemia in SARS-CoV-2 viral infection and COVID-19 outcomes remains unknown. Controversy exists regarding whether to continue treatment for SDB with positive airway pressure given concern for aerosolization with limited data to inform professional society recommendations. Objective: To investigate the association of SDB (identified via polysomnogram) and sleep-related hypoxia with (1) SARS-CoV-2 positivity and (2) World Health Organization (WHO)-designated COVID-19 clinical outcomes while accounting for confounding including obesity, underlying cardiopulmonary disease, cancer, and smoking history. Design, Setting, and Participants: This case-control study was conducted within the Cleveland Clinic Health System (Ohio and Florida) and included all patients who were tested for COVID-19 between March 8 and November 30, 2020, and who had an available sleep study record. Sleep indices and SARS-CoV-2 positivity were assessed with overlap propensity score weighting, and COVID-19 clinical outcomes were assessed using the institutional registry. Exposures: Sleep study-identified SDB (defined by frequency of apneas and hypopneas using the Apnea-Hypopnea Index [AHI]) and sleep-related hypoxemia (percentage of total sleep time at <90% oxygen saturation [TST <90]). Main Outcomes and Measures: Outcomes were SARS-CoV-2 infection and WHO-designated COVID-19 clinical outcomes (hospitalization, use of supplemental oxygen, noninvasive ventilation, mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and death). Results: Of 350 710 individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2, 5402 (mean [SD] age, 56.4 [14.5] years; 3005 women [55.6%]) had a prior sleep study, of whom 1935 (35.8%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Of the 5402 participants, 1696 were Black (31.4%), 3259 were White (60.3%), and 822 were of other race or ethnicity (15.2%). Patients who were positive vs negative for SARS-CoV-2 had a higher AHI score (median, 16.2 events/h [IQR, 6.1-39.5 events/h] vs 13.6 events/h [IQR, 5.5-33.6 events/h]; P < .001) and increased TST <90 (median, 1.8% sleep time [IQR, 0.10%-12.8% sleep time] vs 1.4% sleep time [IQR, 0.10%-10.8% sleep time]; P = .02). After overlap propensity score-weighted logistic regression, no SDB measures were associated with SARS-CoV-2 positivity. Median TST <90 was associated with the WHO-designated COVID-19 ordinal clinical outcome scale (adjusted odds ratio, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.10-1.74; P = .005). Time-to-event analyses showed sleep-related hypoxia associated with a 31% higher rate of hospitalization and mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.08-1.57; P = .005). Conclusions and Relevance: In this case-control study, SDB and sleep-related hypoxia were not associated with increased SARS-CoV-2 positivity; however, once patients were infected with SARS-CoV-2, sleep-related hypoxia was an associated risk factor for detrimental COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cause of Death , Hospitalization , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/complications , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Florida , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypoxia , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Ohio , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/pathology , Sleep Apnea Syndromes/therapy
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 543-545, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504076

ABSTRACT

Sufficient sleep is vital to the health and safety of healthcare workers and patients alike. Despite this, formal sleep promotion programs rarely exist within healthcare. Guidance does exist for how to incorporate strategies within healthcare organizations. Nurse leaders can spearhead efforts by promoting healthy sleep and instituting change through scheduling practices, unit policies, and supporting staff when barriers to healthy sleep develop.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Organizational Innovation , Sleep/physiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Leadership , Organizational Culture
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502424

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Only a few studies have studied the link between risk perception and sleep in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of our study is to propose and test a theoretical model to understand the relationships between COVID-19 risk appraisals-risk perception and perception of collective coordinated defense (PCCD) in particular-and subjective sleep quality in Chinese adults in Hong Kong during the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19-related fear and rumination were examined as potential mediators of the relationships. METHODS: Data were collected using a self-report online questionnaire from a convenience sample of 224 Chinese adults during the fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong. RESULTS: Risk perception and PCCD were found to predict poor sleep quality. Mediation analysis showed that both fear and rumination mediated the relationship between risk perception and sleep quality, whereas only fear mediated the relationship between PCCD and sleep quality. The model was an excellent fit to the data and accounted for 44% of the variance in sleep quality in Chinese adults. This study indicated that both perception of high risks of contracting COVID-19 and anticipations of collective disease preventive efforts had adverse effects on subjective sleep quality via increasing COVID-19-related fear. CONCLUSIONS: These findings underscore the need for addressing sleep problems induced by psychological consequences of the pandemic. While policy makers often deliver public messaging campaigns that frame disease prevention as a collective goal, developing evidence-based coping strategies to combat COVID-19 adverse impacts on psychological health is equally important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
9.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(5): 296-: I-303, XXVIII, oct. 2021. tab, ilus
Article in English, Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1502722

ABSTRACT

Los problemas del sueño (PS) son frecuentes, principalmente en niñas y niños con trastornos del desarrollo (TD), y causan un impacto en su funcionamiento y calidad de vida familiar. El pediatra tiene un rol importante en su abordaje. Objetivo. Definir la frecuencia y los tipos de PS en una muestra de niñas y niños con TD, determinar la proporción de pediatras que abordaron estas dificultades, evaluar los efectos de la higiene del sueño (HS) y describir el impacto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en el sueño. Población y métodos. Estudio cuasiexperimental. El diagnóstico de PS se realizó con la preocupación de los padres y/o criterios clínicos. Se brindaron estrategias de HS, luego se evaluó su efecto según referencia de los padres y uso del cuestionario CSHQ-S (Children ́s Sleep Habits Questionnaire en español) pre- y posestrategias. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19, se midió nuevamente la variable PS y las relacionadas a HS. Resultados. Se incluyeron 161 niñas y niños. La frecuencia de PS fue del 55 %. El 80 % mejoró con HS. El 83 % tenía pediatra de cabecera, y de ellos, el 45 % había preguntado acerca del sueño. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 hubo aumento de PS y cambios en las variables de HS. Conclusión. Aproximadamente la mitad de los niñas y niños con TD presentan PS; esto solo fue abordado por el 45 % de los pediatras. La HS resultó beneficiosa para la mayoría, por lo que la intervención del pediatra parece fundamental. Durante la pandemia por COVID-19 aumentaron los PS, como posible reflejo del impacto ambiental en los niñas y niños con TD.


Sleep problems (SPs) are common, especially among children with developmental disorders (DDs), and affect their functioning and quality of family life. Pediatricians play a major role in their management. Objective. To define the frequency and types of SPs in a sample of children with DDs, determine the proportion of pediatricians who addressed such difficulties, assess the effects of sleep hygiene (SH), and describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on sleep. Population and methods. This was a quasi-experiment. SPs were diagnosed based on parents' concerns and/or clinical criteria. SH strategies were provided and their effect was assessed as per parents' reports and the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire in Spanish (CSHQ-S) before and after the strategies. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the SP outcome measure and SH-related outcome measures were measured again. Results. A total of 161 children were included. The frequency of SPs was 55 %; 80 % improved with SH. Eighty-three percent of children had a primary pediatrician; of these, 45 % had consulted about sleep. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased and SH outcome measures changed. Conclusion. Approximately half of children with DDs have SPs; and the problem was only addressed by 45 % of pediatricians. SH was beneficial for most children, so pediatricians' role seems critical. During the COVID-19 pandemic, SPs increased, probably as a result of its environmental impact on children with DD


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Sleep , Developmental Disabilities , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21342, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493216

ABSTRACT

Community-wide lockdowns in response to COVID-19 influenced many families, but the developmental cascade for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be especially detrimental. Our objective was to evaluate behavioral patterns of risk and resilience for children with ASD across parent-report assessments before (from November 2019 to February 2020), during (March 2020 to May 2020), and after (June 2020 to November 2020) an extended COVID-19 lockdown. In 2020, our study Mobile-based care for children with ASD using remote experience sampling method (mCARE) was inactive data collection before COVID-19 emerged as a health crisis in Bangladesh. Here we deployed "Cohort Studies", where we had in total 300 children with ASD (150 test group and 150 control group) to collect behavioral data. Our data collection continued through an extended COVID-19 lockdown and captured parent reports of 30 different behavioral parameters (e.g., self-injurious behaviors, aggression, sleep problems, daily living skills, and communication) across 150 children with ASD (test group). Based on the children's condition, 4-6 behavioral parameters were assessed through the study. A total of 56,290 behavioral data points was collected (an average of 152.19 per week) from parent cell phones using the mCARE platform. Children and their families were exposed to an extended COVID-19 lockdown. The main outcomes used for this study were generated from parent reports child behaviors within the mCARE platform. Behaviors included of child social skills, communication use, problematic behaviors, sensory sensitivities, daily living, and play. COVID-19 lockdowns for children with autism and their families are not universally negative but supports in the areas of "Problematic Behavior" could serve to mitigate future risk.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Phone Use , Child Behavior/psychology , Child Care/methods , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Activities of Daily Living , Aggression , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Communication , Female , Humans , Male , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Sleep , Social Skills
11.
Int Psychogeriatr ; 33(10): 1005-1007, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492960
12.
In Vivo ; 35(6): 3333-3337, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485629

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: A considerable number of patients with lung cancer are scheduled for definitive or adjuvant radiotherapy. Prevalence and potential risk factors of pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances were evaluated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen factors were retrospectively investigated for associations with pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbances in 77 lung cancer patients. Factors included COVID-19 pandemic; age; gender; performance score; comorbidity index; history of another malignancy; distress score; number of emotional, physical or practical problems; patient's request for psychological support; histology; tumor stage; upfront surgery; chemotherapy; and type of radiotherapy. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients (40.3%) reported sleep disturbances that were significantly associated with distress score 6-10 (p=0.019), ≥2 emotional problems (p=0.001), ≥5 physical problems (p<0.001), and request for psychological support (p=0.006). Trends were found for female gender (p=0.064) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (p=0.057). CONCLUSION: Many lung cancer patients assigned to radiotherapy reported sleep disturbances. Risk factors can be used to identify patients in need of psychological support already before treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic may lead to a significant decrease in physical activity, an increase in sedentary behavior, and thus also such things as screen time or a change in health behavior patterns. The survey aimed to compare levels of physical activity, screen time, hours spent sitting and sleeping time among Polish children aged 3-5 years of age before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We identified 3000 respondents under five years of age, at Polish kindergartens. The questionnaire consists of 62 questions according to the recommendations of health behavior in school-aged children. The questionnaire was completed by the parents of these children. RESULTS: Only 30.77% of children complied with WHO criteria before the pandemic. During the pandemic, the percentage of children meeting the recommendations for physical activity decreased even more. Children spent much more time in a sitting position before the restrictions. The children slept as recommended 10-13 h a day, and the pandemic caused an increase in sleep duration of 10-18%. Most children had a limited time allowed for the use of electronic devices already before the pandemic, but during the pandemic the results negatively decreased by 71.54%. CONCLUSIONS: The results clearly indicate decreased physical activity and increased screen time. It is also crucial to develop recommendations for prevention management strategies of sedentary lifestyles in the youngest group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Cohort Studies , Exercise , Humans , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Screen Time , Sedentary Behavior , Sleep , World Health Organization
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480759

ABSTRACT

Stress and lack of quality sleep affect a large portion of the population around the globe, and the COVID-19 pandemic has genuinely brought attention to these problems. This study aimed to investigate whether using a virtual heart-based meditation program is associated with improved stress levels and quality of sleep among participants from the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic. We recruited 63 participants to receive an 8-week virtually conducted Heartfulness meditation program in a prospective pre-post single-arm intervention study from September 28 to November 22 2020. Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores were collected at baseline, at 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Of the 63 participants enrolled in the study, 36 (57%) completed an 8-week Heartfulness meditation program. There was a significant decrease in PSS (mean difference of 6.68 with 95% C.I. 4.89-8.47, p < 0.0001) and in PSQI (mean difference of 2.05 with 95% C.I. 1.03-3.07, p < 0.0001) between week zero and week eight, regardless of Health Care Professional status. The qualitative thematic analysis strongly supported the survey results. A significant reduction in perceived stress score and improvement in sleep quality index was noted at the end of a virtual Heartfulness meditation program. Moreover, Heartfulness meditation practice may help cultivate the quality of empathy, acceptance, and individual peace. We conclude that the effects of virtually accessible Heartfulness meditation practice need to be explored further in larger studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meditation , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
15.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e051497, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476604

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In spring 2020, the first COVID-19 national lockdown placed unprecedented restrictions on the behaviour and movements of the UK population. Citizens were ordered to 'stay at home', only allowed to leave their houses to buy essential supplies, attend medical appointments or exercise once a day. We explored how lockdown and its subsequent easing changed young children's everyday activities, eating and sleep habits to gain insight into the impact for health and well-being. DESIGN: In-depth qualitative interviews; data analysed using thematic analysis. SETTING: South West and West Midlands of England. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty parents (16 mothers; 4 fathers) of preschool-age children (3-5 years) due to start school in September 2020. Forty per cent of the sample were from Black, Asian or minority ethnic backgrounds and half lived in the most deprived areas. RESULTS: Children's activity, screen time, eating and sleep routines had been disrupted. Parents reported children ate more snacks, but families also spent more time preparing meals and eating together. Most parents reported a reduction in their children's physical activity and an increase in screen time, which some linked to difficulties in getting their child to sleep. Parents sometimes expressed guilt about changes in activity, screen time and snacking over lockdown. Most felt these changes would be temporary, though others worried about re-establishing healthy routines. CONCLUSIONS: Parents reported that lockdown negatively impacted on preschool children's eating, activity and sleep routines. While some positive changes were identified, many participants described lack of routines, habits and boundaries which may have been detrimental for child health and development. Guidance and support for families during COVID-19 restrictions could be valuable to help maintain healthy activity, eating, screen time and sleeping routines to protect child health and ensure unhealthy habits are not adopted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Sleep
16.
Psychiatry Res ; 301: 113863, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474998

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and its accompanying infection control measures introduced significant disruptions to the routines of many higher education students around the world. It also deprived them of in-person counselling services and social support. These changes have put students at a greater risk of developing mental illness. The objective of this review is to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances in higher education students during the pandemic. A systematic search of English and Chinese databases was conducted current to January 1st, 2021. The quality of included studies was evaluated using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and sleep disturbances were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Eighty-nine studies (n=1,441,828) were included. The pooled prevalence of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and sleep disturbances was 34%, 32% and 33%, respectively. The prevalence values differ based on geographical regions, diagnostic criteria, education level, undergraduate year of study, financial situation, living arrangements and gender. Overall, the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms synthesized in this study was higher compared to pre-pandemic prevalence in similar populations. Evidently, mental health screening and intervention should be a top priority for universities and colleges during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep/physiology , Universities
17.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0257904, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468162

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 pandemic cautionary measures have affected the daily life of people around the globe. Further, understanding the complete lifestyle behaviors profile can help healthcare providers in designing effective interventions and assessing overall health impact on risk of disease development. Thus, this study aims to assess the complete spectrum of lifestyle behaviors (physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, distress, social support, dietary habits, and smoking) prevalence and its association with fear of COVID-19 in people living in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: Self-administered survey consisted of seven sections was used to collect data on fear of COVID-19 using Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S), physical activity and sedentary behavior using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ), sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), psychosocial distress using Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K-10), social support using the MOS social support survey, and dietary habits using a short version of food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The online survey was distributed via social media platforms during lockdown period of COVID-19 pandemic (May-June 2020). Each section consisted of validated questionnaire examining one of aforementioned lifestyle behaviors. Associations were analyzed using multiple linear regression. RESULTS: A total of 669 individuals attempted to complete the online survey, 554 participants completed at least 2 sections of the survey (82.8%), and 41.3% (n = 276) completed the whole online survey. The majority of the sample were female (83%), not smokers (86.5%), had sufficient sleep duration (7.5 hrs ± 2.1), and only indicated mild level of distress (21.4 ± 8.9); they also reported high level of sedentary behavior (7.7 hrs ± 4.5), poor sleep quality (5.4 ± 2.4), were not engaged in healthy eating habits, and moderate level of perceived social support (62.0% ± 27). Only physical activity results indicated that about half of the sample were engaged in moderate to vigorous level of physical activity (54.3%). Further, being female (ß = 0.12; 95% CI: 0.45, 2.94) and married (ß = 0.13; 95% CI: 0.3, 2.63) were associated with fear of COVID-19 level (ß = 0.21; 95% IC: 0.05, 0.19) with a confidence interval level of 95%. In addition, distress was associated with fear. CONCLUSION: The trend of lifestyle behaviors measured during lockdown period changed from previously published rates. Future research needs to establish the short-term and long-term effect of lifestyle behaviors complete profile on physical and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Life Style , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sedentary Behavior , Sleep , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
Psychiatry Res ; 305: 114243, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466842

ABSTRACT

The long-term impact of the COVID-19 infection on mental health in people and its relation to the severity is unclear. We aimed to study the long-term effect of post-COVID-19 disease on sleep and mental health and to detect possible relationship between severity of COVID-19 at onset and sleep and mental illness. We enrolled 182 participants 6 months post COVID-19 infection and grouped into non-severe(101),severe(60) and critical(20) according to according to WHO guidance. All participants were assessed using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index ", Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist for DSM-5, and Symptom Checklist90 test. Only 8.8% had no psychiatric symptoms while 91.2% had psychiatric symptoms as follow (poor sleep (64.8%), PTSD (28.6%), somatization (41.8%), obsessive-compulsive (OCD) (19.8%), depression (11.5%), anxiety (28%), phobic-anxiety (24.2%), psychoticism (17.6%)). Diabetes, oxygen support or mechanically ventilated were a risk for sleep impairment, while high Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio(NLR) was the only risk factor for PTSD. Other psychiatric illnesses had several risk factors: being female, diabetes, oxygen support or mechanically ventilated. Abnormal sleep, somatization and anxiety are the most common mental illnesses in Post-Covid19. The critical group is common associated with PTSD, anxiety, and psychosis. Being female, diabetic, having oxygen support or mechanically ventilated, and high NLR level are more vulnerable for mental illness in post COVID19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
19.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(18)2021 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468445

ABSTRACT

Older adults are susceptible to poor night-time sleep, characterized by short sleep duration and high sleep disruptions (i.e., more frequent and longer awakenings). This study aimed to longitudinally and objectively assess the changes in sleep patterns of older Australians during the 2020 pandemic lockdown. A non-invasive mattress-based device, known as the EMFIT QS, was used to continuously monitor sleep in 31 older adults with an average age of 84 years old before (November 2019-February 2020) and during (March-May 2020) the COVID-19, a disease caused by a form of coronavirus, lockdown. Total sleep time, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, time to bed, and time out of bed were measured across these two periods. Overall, there was no significant change in total sleep time; however, women had a significant increase in total sleep time (36 min), with a more than 30-min earlier bedtime. There was also no increase in wake after sleep onset and sleep onset latency. Sleep efficiency remained stable across the pandemic time course between 84-85%. While this sample size is small, these data provide reassurance that objective sleep measurement did not deteriorate through the pandemic in older community-dwelling Australians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Australia/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468399

ABSTRACT

Regular exercise may be associated with better self-rated health and sleep status. However, this correlation among various age groups, such as young, middle-aged, and older people, as well as during the COVID-19 pandemic, has not been examined. This study examined the correlation between regular exercise and self-rated health and sleep quality among adults in Japan during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected using an online survey conducted between February 26 and 27, 2021. A total of 1410 adults in Japan (age range, 20-86 years) completed the online survey. Regular exercise was divided into: (1) more than 30 min of moderate exercise a day, (2) more than 2 days per week, and (3) continuous for 1 year or longer. Self-rated health and sleep quality were assessed using the Likert scale. After adjusting for multiple confounders, regular exercise was correlated with decreased poor self-rated health and poor sleep quality in middle-aged adults; however, no significant correlation was observed among young and older adults. The promotion of regular exercise among middle-aged people during the COVID-19 pandemic may contribute to better self-rated health and sleep quality status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Exercise , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Young Adult
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