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2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(4): 1403-1413, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732623

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was planned to determine the burnout levels of physicians during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to contribute to taking the necessary measures by determining the associated factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This research was designed via Google Online Form as an online survey with questions of Sociodemographic Data Form, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory and was conducted with 40 specialist physicians actively working at the Sakarya University Training and Research Hospital. The same questionnaire was re-applied online after two months, and 24 out of 40 physicians were accessed. The SPSS 25 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) program was used for the analysis of the data. RESULTS: According to the Maslach Burnout Inventory applied in the pre-test, it was found that the feeling of personal accomplishment was high, emotional burnout was normal, and depersonalization was low. Anxiety and burnout were found to be positively correlated, and there were no statistically significant differences in the average values of the pre-and post-test Maslach Burnout Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores. CONCLUSIONS: Detecting possible burnout in physicians working in a pandemic, identifying associated factors and taking required measures can be beneficial both for physicians and society from a biopsychosocial perspective.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Workload/psychology , Adult , Anxiety , Correlation of Data , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Social Conditions , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
3.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 171, 2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662413

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Studies on the public health consequences of COVID-19 pandemic showing data based on robust methods are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate mental and physical health as well as living conditions and lifestyle habits in the general population before and after the COVID-19 outbreak in Sweden. METHODS: The study is based on 2273 persons 16-84 years who responded to the national public health survey in February-May 2020 in Värmland county (overall response rate 45%). The differences between early respondents (before the outbreak, n = 1711) and late respondents (after the outbreak, n = 562) were studied using multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for background characteristics: age, gender, educational level, and country of birth. The same analyses were also completed in the corresponding survey carried out in February-June 2018. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences between the groups were obtained for economic difficulties and worry about losing one's job, which were more common among late respondents, and for sleeping difficulties, which were more common among early respondents after adjusting for background characteristics. There were no differences in other living conditions nor in lifestyle factors. Prevalence of good self-rated health, high blood pressure, aches in shoulders or neck, anxiety or worry and stress did not differ between the groups. In 2018, the only statistically significant difference between early and late respondents concerned economic difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Very few differences in living conditions, lifestyle factors and health were observed in the study population before and after the COVID-19 outbreak. The results suggest that, in addition to a possible decrease in sleeping difficulties, the prevalence of being worried about losing one's job increased among the employed after the outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Habits , Humans , Life Style , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Conditions , Surveys and Questionnaires , Sweden/epidemiology
4.
Intern Med ; 60(24): 3879-3888, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574992

ABSTRACT

Objective The stress brought on by changes in social conditions due to COVID-19 is diverse. However, there have been no studies examining the relationship between the type of stress felt by an individual due to such changes in social conditions and the degree of change in HbA1c, prompting us to conduct this study. Methods We conducted a collaborative study at two diabetes clinics. A total of 1,000 subjects responded to the questionnaire. Data on HbA1c and body weight before and after the declaration of the state of emergency were collected. Results We conducted a questionnaire on some stressors, but when comparing the two groups with respect to whether or not they felt stress from each item, only "school closures for children," seemed to be associated with a significant difference in the amount of change in HbA1c. In the stressed group, i.e. the group of parents who experienced stress due to their children's schools being closed, the HbA1c value changed from 7.30±0.78 to 7.30±1.13 (p=0.985). By contrast, in the unstressed group, the HbA1c value significantly decreased from 7.28±0.98 to 7.06±0.85 (p<0.001). In addition, as a result of comparing the amount of change between the 2 groups, a significant decrease was observed in the unstressed group compared with the stressed group (p=0.032). There was no significant difference in body weight change between the two groups. Conclusion Stress that cannot be avoided by one's own will, such as school closures for children, may affect glycemic control.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Body Weight , Child , Glycemic Control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Conditions
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 23711, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565733

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, evidence shows the negative psychological impact of lockdown measures in the general population. It is also important to identify predictors of psychological distress in vulnerable people, particularly patients with history of depressive episodes (the most prevalent psychiatric disorder), in order to adapt mental health strategies for future lockdown measures. This study aim was to (1) compare in 69 healthy controls (HC) and 346 patients with a major depressive episode in the two previous years (PP) self-reported psychological symptoms (depression, anxiety, insomnia, suicidal ideation, traumatic stress, anger) and living conditions during the first national French lockdown, and (2) identify predictors of significant psychological distress in PP. The levels of psychological symptoms were very low in HC compared with PP, independently of the living conditions. Half of PP had no psychiatric contact during the lockdown. Loneliness and boredom were independent predictors of depression, anxiety and insomnia, whereas daily physical activity was a protective factor. Virtual contacts protected against suicidal ideation. Our results highlight the need of specific strategies to target loneliness and boredom and to improve care access, including telepsychiatry. Longitudinal studies must investigate the COVID-19 pandemic psychological impact in clinical samples.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology , Mood Disorders/psychology , Patients/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anger , Anxiety/psychology , Boredom , Female , France , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Social Conditions/statistics & numerical data , Social Determinants of Health , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/psychology , Suicidal Ideation , Telemedicine , Young Adult
6.
Cien Saude Colet ; 26(11): 5629-5638, 2021 Nov.
Article in Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547036

ABSTRACT

This paper makes a critical assessment of epidemiology with the COVID-19 pandemic as a social event. It examines the philosophical reflection in which Agamben defines as contemporary those able to stand back to see the dark side of their own era. In the light of decolonial criticism, the concept of "epidemiological transition," with its theory of transcendence of "social determinants of health" and binarism of epidemiological variables as supports of the biomedical and quantitative structuring of the epidemiology of risk factors is queried. The scientific ambition to dominate nature and the engendering of a linear and evolutionary historical time, beginning in western modernity, contextualizes the epistemicides of popular wisdom and the coloniality of epidemiological knowledge. The theoretical constitution of decolonial thought is historically analyzed, highlighting its greater critical potential to reveal the structural colonization of epidemiological knowledge. The post-pandemic future is considered and Prigogine's idea of bifurcation - as elaborated by Sousa Santos - and Paulo Freire's untested feasibility are related with the concept of time as the creation and expectation of social transformation.


O ensaio epistemológico relaciona criticamente a epidemiologia com a pandemia de COVID-19 enquanto evento social. Explora-se a reflexão filosófica em que Agamben define contemporâneo como quem é capaz de se afastar e enxergar o lado escuro do seu tempo. À luz da crítica decolonial, questionam-se a ideia de "transição epidemiológica", com sua transcendência na teoria dos "determinantes sociais de saúde", e a disposição binarista das varáveis epidemiológicas, como suportes da estruturação quantitativa e biomédica da epidemiologia dos fatores de risco. A pretensão científica de domínio da natureza e o engendramento de um tempo histórico linear e evolutivo, que inicia com a modernidade ocidental, contextualizam os epistemicídios dos saberes populares e a colonização do saber epidemiológico. Historiciza-se a constituição do pensamento crítico decolonial e pontua-se seu potencial para a revelação do caráter estrutural da colonização do saber epidemiológico. Considera-se o futuro pós-pandemia e relacionam-se as ideias de bifurcação, originada de Ilya Prigogine e elaborada por Boaventura de Sousa Santos, e inédito viável, de Paulo Freire com a concepção do tempo como criação e a expectativa de transformação social.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Colonialism , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Conditions
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(5)2020 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389345

ABSTRACT

Within last 17 years two widespread epidemics of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in China, which were caused by related coronaviruses (CoVs): SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. Although the origin(s) of these viruses are still unknown and their occurrences in nature are mysterious, some general patterns of their pathogenesis and epidemics are noticeable. Both viruses utilize the same receptor-angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)-for invading human bodies. Both epidemics occurred in cold dry winter seasons celebrated with major holidays, and started in regions where dietary consumption of wildlife is a fashion. Thus, if bats were the natural hosts of SARS-CoVs, cold temperature and low humidity in these times might provide conducive environmental conditions for prolonged viral survival in these regions concentrated with bats. The widespread existence of these bat-carried or -released viruses might have an easier time in breaking through human defenses when harsh winter makes human bodies more vulnerable. Once succeeding in making some initial human infections, spreading of the disease was made convenient with increased social gathering and holiday travel. These natural and social factors influenced the general progression and trajectory of the SARS epidemiology. However, some unique factors might also contribute to the origination of SARS in Wuhan. These factors are discussed in different scenarios in order to promote more research for achieving final validation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS Virus/pathogenicity , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Chiroptera , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Seasons , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/transmission , Social Conditions , Travel , Zoonoses
10.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256261, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367705

ABSTRACT

Evidence suggests that non-binary people have poorer mental and physical health outcomes, compared with people who identify within the gender binomial (man/woman). Research on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health has been conducted worldwide in the last few months. It has however overlooked gender diversity. The aim of our study was to explore social and health-related factors associated with mental health (anxiety and depression) among people who do not identify with the man/woman binomial during COVID-19 lockdown in Spain. A cross-sectional study with online survey, aimed at the population residing in Spain during lockdown, was conducted. Data were collected between the 8th of April until the 28th of May 2020, the time period when lockdown was implemented in Spain. Mental health was measured using the Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale for anxiety, and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depression. The survey included the question: Which sex do you identify with? The options "Man", "Woman", "Non-binary" and "I do not identify" were given. People who answered one of the last two options were selected for this study. Multivariate regression logistic models were constructed to evaluate the associations between sociodemographic, social and health-related factors, anxiety and depression. Out of the 7125 people who participated in the survey, 72 (1%) identified as non-binary or to not identify with another category. People who do not identify with the man/woman binomial (non-binary/I do not identify) presented high proportions of anxiety (41.7%) and depression (30.6%). Poorer mental health was associated with social-employment variables (e.g., not working before the pandemic) and health-related variables (e.g., poor or regular self-rated health). These findings suggest that social inequities, already experienced by non-binary communities before the pandemic, may deepen due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Mental Health , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Gender Identity , Humans , Male , Social Conditions , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Front Public Health ; 9: 694191, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348573

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic had huge impacts on the global world, with both a negative impact on society and economy but a positive one on nature. But this universal effect resulted in different infection rates from country to country. We analyzed the relationship between the pandemic and ecological, economic, and social conditions. All of these data were collected in 140 countries at six time points. Correlations were studied using univariate and multivariate regression models. The world was interpreted as a single global ecosystem consisting of ecosystem units representing countries. We first studied 140 countries around the world together, and infection rates were related to per capita GDP, Ecological Footprint, median age, urban population, and Biological Capacity, globally. We then ranked the 140 countries according to infection rates. We created four groups with 35 countries each. In the first group of countries, the infection rate was very high and correlated with the Ecological Footprint (consumption) and GDP per capita (production). This group is dominated by developed countries, and their ecological conditions have proved to be particularly significant. In country groups 2, 3, and 4, infection rates were high, medium, and low, respectively, and were mainly related to median age and urban population. In the scientific discussion, we have interpreted why infection rates are very high in developed countries. Sustainable ecosystems are balanced, unlike the ecosystems of developed countries. The resilience and the health of both natural ecosystems and humans are closely linked to the world of microbial communities, the microbiomes of the biosphere. It is clear that both the economy and society need to be in harmony with nature, creating sustainable ecosystems in developed countries as well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ecosystem , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Conditions
12.
Front Public Health ; 9: 642983, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317254

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases exacerbated by Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) are of increasing concern in Sweden, with multi-drug resistant strains associated with new resistance mechanisms that are emerging and spreading worldwide. Existing research has identified that sub-optimal living conditions and poor access to healthcare are significant factors in the spread and incubation of AMR strains. The article considers this linkage and the effort to control the spread of AMR in relation to migrants, highlighting deficiencies in public policy where such individuals are often increasingly exposed to those conditions that exacerbate AMR. In many of the richest countries, those conditions are not accidental, but often direct goals of policies designed with the goal of deterring migrants from staying within host countries. Without engaging with the politics around migration control, the article points to urgent need for more holistic assessment of all public policies that may, however unintentionally, undermine AMR control through worsening living conditions for vulnerable groups. The consequences of prioritizing policies meant to deliberately worsen the living conditions of migrants over avoiding those conditions that accelerate AMR spread, are today made ever apparent where new AMR strains have the potential to dwarf the societal effects of the current Covid-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , Public Policy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Conditions , Sweden/epidemiology
13.
Nature ; 595(7866): 205-213, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303778

ABSTRACT

Social and cultural forces shape almost every aspect of infectious disease transmission in human populations, as well as our ability to measure, understand, and respond to epidemics. For directly transmitted infections, pathogen transmission relies on human-to-human contact, with kinship, household, and societal structures shaping contact patterns that in turn determine epidemic dynamics. Social, economic, and cultural forces also shape patterns of exposure, health-seeking behaviour, infection outcomes, the likelihood of diagnosis and reporting of cases, and the uptake of interventions. Although these social aspects of epidemiology are hard to quantify and have limited the generalizability of modelling frameworks in a policy context, new sources of data on relevant aspects of human behaviour are increasingly available. Researchers have begun to embrace data from mobile devices and other technologies as useful proxies for behavioural drivers of disease transmission, but there is much work to be done to measure and validate these approaches, particularly for policy-making. Here we discuss how integrating local knowledge in the design of model frameworks and the interpretation of new data streams offers the possibility of policy-relevant models for public health decision-making as well as the development of robust, generalizable theories about human behaviour in relation to infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/transmission , Disease Transmission, Infectious , Models, Biological , Social Conditions/statistics & numerical data , Climate , Culture , Datasets as Topic , Epidemics , Female , Humans , Locomotion , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Assessment , Weather
15.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 63(1): e1-e3, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1296013

ABSTRACT

In the wake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the links between poor hygiene, unclean environments and human health cannot be overemphasised, particularly in South Africa with its high incidence of infectious diseases and overburdened health system. One very controllable factor that is often overlooked is the poor disposal of litter and waste management and its adverse effects on public health. By wearing masks, regular handwashing and sanitising, as well as making sure that neighbourhoods and public spaces are clean and safe, the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases can be prevented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Environmental Health/organization & administration , Environmental Restoration and Remediation , Public Health/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Humans , Hygiene/standards , Social Conditions , Social Determinants of Health , South Africa/epidemiology
16.
Environ Microbiol ; 23(8): 4077-4091, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263778

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an acute, highly transmissible respiratory infection that is potentially lethal, but often mild, sometimes asymptomatic, especially in the young. However, it has become clear that, in some patients, there may be sequelae involving tissues other than the lung, resulting in other types of morbidity, and sometimes longer term consequences that are often termed 'long covid'. In this Lilliput, we summarize recent findings about COVID-19 sequelae, with a particular focus on long covid. We also discuss some of the long scars that COVID-19 and long covid will collectively leave on society that we term Societal Long Covid.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Humans , Lung , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Conditions
17.
Global Health ; 17(1): 46, 2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183549

ABSTRACT

Health innovations are generally oriented on a techno-economic vision. In this perspective, technologies are seen as an end in themselves, and there is no arrangement between the technical and the social values of innovation. This vision prevails in sanitary crises, in which management is carried out based on the search for punctual, reactive, and technical solutions to remedy a specific problem without a systemic/holistic, sustainable, or proactive approach. This paper attempts to contribute to the literature on the epistemological orientation of innovations in the field of public health. Taking the Covid-19 and Ebola crises as examples, the primary objective is to show how innovation in health is oriented towards a techno-economic paradigm. Second, we propose a repositioning of public health innovation towards a social paradigm that will put more emphasis on the interaction between social and health dimensions in the perspective of social change. We will conclude by highlighting the roles that public health could play in allowing innovations to have more social value, especially during sanitary crises.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Technology , COVID-19/therapy , Health Care Reform , Health Priorities , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/therapy , Public Health , Access to Information , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Diffusion of Innovation , Health Equity , Health Services Accessibility , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/prevention & control , Humans , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Social Conditions , Social Environment , Social Values , Technology , Vaccines
19.
Med Decis Making ; 41(4): 419-429, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153779

ABSTRACT

As the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continues to expand, policymakers are striving to balance the combinations of nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to keep people safe and minimize social disruptions. We developed and calibrated an agent-based simulation to model COVID-19 outbreaks in the greater Seattle area. The model simulated NPIs, including social distancing, face mask use, school closure, testing, and contact tracing with variable compliance and effectiveness to identify optimal NPI combinations that can control the spread of the virus in a large urban area. Results highlight the importance of at least 75% face mask use to relax social distancing and school closure measures while keeping infections low. It is important to relax NPIs cautiously during vaccine rollout in 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Contact Tracing , Masks , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Social Conditions , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computer Simulation , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Urban Population , Washington
20.
Psychiatriki ; 32(1): 15-18, 2021 Apr 19.
Article in English, Greek | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148408

ABSTRACT

As of the end of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to over 82 million verified infections and almost 1.8 million COVID-19-related deaths worldwide,1 resulting to an unprecedented public health response around the globe. The COVID-19 pandemic, together with the applied multi-level restrictive measures, has generated a unique combination of an unpredictable and stressful biomedical and socioeconomic environment (i.e., syndemic),2 introducing real-life threat, involuntary and drastic every-day life-style changes with uncertain financial and future prospects, alongside with minimized coping and stress management possibilities.3 This combination of so many different and vital stressors may lead to acute as well as long-term, direct, indirect and even transgenerational unfavourable effects on physical and mental health and functioning, which might even represent the most precarious and still unpredictable public-health-related part of the pandemic.4 Thereby, specific population groups could be at particular risk of poor health outcomes in relation to applied public health measures.4, 5 However, not every individual will experience the same level of negative impact on health and well-being during the pandemic, as several additional national, socioeconomic, environmental, behavioural, emotional and cognitive factors can moderate individual resilience and coping.6 Pandemic-related research should, thus, assess as many multidimensional risk and protective factors as possible in a longitudinal, large-scale and multi-national manner, enabling a profound and comprehensive understanding of the complex health and societal impact of the pandemic worldwide.7 Nevertheless, to date, most research findings are cross-sectional, report on small and non- representative samples from individual countries, or on specific population groups (e.g., health care workers, students, clinical populations) and usually assess only a very restricted set of outcomes and time-points. Thereby, only few studies assess coping strategies, medical history or detailed socioeconomic, demographic and environmental data. In addition, most studies leave behind linguistic differences, being available in one or at best two different languages. Such investigations of small outcome subsets within a narrow framework preclude a broader and clear understanding of the multifaceted pandemic impact on the general population and specific subgroups. Acknowledging these gaps in the existing literature, large- scale, collaborative research prospectively collecting and monitoring a broad range of real- time, multi-dimensional health-related, societal and behavioural outcome data from countries across the globe is currently explicitly needed. The Collaborative Outcomes study on Health and Functioning during Infection Times (COH- FIT) envisions to fill this gap. Based on an easy-to-access webpage (www.coh-fit.com), COH- FIT is the currently largest-scale known international collaborative study of over 200 researchers around the globe, prospectively collecting the biggest set of multi-dimensional and multi-disciplinary data from 150 high, middle, and low-income countries in over 30 languages and in three different age groups (adults, adolescents, children) of the general population, focusing also on relevant at-risk subgroups. Albeit being a cross-sectional anonymous survey on an individual level, it is a longitudinal study on a population level, as data are collected continuously since April 2020 and until the WHO declares the end of the pandemic. In addition to snowball recruitment, this project also collects information from nationally representative samples. Furthermore, COH-FIT is the first study of this scale investigating pandemic effects on health and functioning measures between family members, while it also specifically assesses a large list of behavioral and coping factors (e.g., screen time, social media usage, physical activity, social interaction, religious practices, etc.) on outcomes of interest. COH-FIT also monitors changes in public health restrictive measures to enhance data harmonization across nations and time, and to better investigate their impact on physical and mental health, while it also collects information on changes in healthcare systems functioning. The COH-FIT project was worldwide first initiated in Greece after the ethics committee approval of the School of Medicine of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and is officially supported by the Hellenic Psychiatric Association, European Psychiatric Association, World Association of Social Psychiatry, ECNP Network on the Prevention of Mental Disorders and Mental Health Promotion, among many other national and international scientific associations. To date, COH-FIT has already collected >115,000 participations worldwide (>8,000 in Greece), but more participants are still needed, both during the second and third wave of the pandemic, as in the future, after the pandemic has ended. Currently, the COH-FIT survey actively collects the largest sample on multifactorial data on the impact of the COVD-19 pandemic on health and functioning not only in Greece, but around the globe. The elaborated design of COH-FIT and similar studies may allow a better identification of key parameters and population groups at increased risk during the pandemic, as well as potential targets for acute and long-term prevention or intervention strategies in the current as in possible future pandemics. A profound understanding of the health and societal impact of the pandemic could facilitate an optimized governmental, social and individual health preparedness during infection times8 and the bridging of individuals', societal and systemic needs and actions through multi-level guideline development with the aim to improve mental health outcomes globally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emotions , Holistic Health , Pandemics , Social Conditions , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
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