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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 Jul 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994030

ABSTRACT

(1) Purpose: Previous studies investigated the positive relationship between professional identity and career satisfaction in teachers, but the underlying reasons were not explored. Therefore, the present study explores the mediating effects of two variables, namely, psychological empowerment and work engagement on the relationship between professional identity and career satisfaction. (2) Method: The present study used the professional identity scale, psychological empowerment scale, Utrecht Work Engagement scale and career satisfaction scale to investigate 2104 teachers (Mage = 39.50 years, SD = 8.74) in a province in China. The demographic variables (e.g., gender, age, teaching age) were controlled as covariates to conduct conservative predictions. (3) Result: (a) professional identity is positively related to career satisfaction; (b) psychological empowerment and career satisfaction play parallel mediator roles between professional identity and career satisfaction; (c) psychological empowerment and career satisfaction play serial mediator roles between professional identity and career satisfaction. (4) Limitations: Data were collected by participant self-report. This method may lead to recall bias. Further, we adopted a cross-sectional rather than experimental or longitudinal design, thus precluding causal conclusions. Lastly, it would be useful to validate our findings with a national sample. (5) Conclusions: The present study indicates that the relationship between professional identity is positively associated with teacher career satisfaction. More importantly, professional identity can indirectly make an impact on teacher career satisfaction through the single mediating effects of psychological empowerment and work engagement, and the chain mediating effect, by improving the level of psychological empowerment, and thereby increasing work engagement.


Subject(s)
Job Satisfaction , Work Engagement , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Power, Psychological , Social Identification , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604812, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933948

ABSTRACT

Many western democracies experienced significant resistance to public health measures designed to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Although there were complex reasons for this resistance, right-wing populist forces seem to have played a significant role in fueling it. Studies show a strong correlation between right-wing populist support and resistance to COVID-19-mitigating measures including vaccination, and those who supported these populist movements were more likely to suffer and die from the virus. The question thus arises: why do people support these movements which openly undermine their own health interests? This paper addresses this question from a social-psychological perspective. Specifically, it draws on social identity theory to explain the considerable success of right-wing populism's radical anti-health agenda and to offer some suggestions about how this negative influence may be countered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Politics , Social Identification
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 545, 2022 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933137

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Covid-19 pandemic, which affected medical students globally, could be viewed as a disorientating dilemma with the potential to offer opportunities for transformative learning. In 2021 the Medical Education Innovation and Research Centre at Imperial College London launched a Global Creative Competition as a platform for medical students to reflect on their experiences during the pandemic. METHODS: Six hundred forty-eight creative pieces with written reflections were submitted by medical students from 52 countries. 155 students from 28 countries consented for their entries to be included in this study. The reflections were analysed thematically and independently by three reviewers to explore how the pandemic impacted students' professional identity formation (PIF). RESULTS: The pandemic increased students' awareness of the social and global role of doctors in addressing health inequities. Students felt part of a wider healthcare community and showed greater appreciation towards person-centred care. Students also became more aware of their personal needs, priorities, and the importance of self-care. DISCUSSION: In agreement with Mezirow's theory of transformative learning (2003), the pandemic led students to re-examine pre-existing epistemic and sociocultural assumptions concerning the role of doctors and explore new perspectives of what it means to be a doctor. In accordance with Cheng's theory of coping flexibility (2021), students developed both emotion-focused coping strategies (e.g., arts engagement) and problem-solving strategies (e.g., volunteering), suggesting they were able to adjust psychologically and develop agency. However, students experienced tension between their sense of duty and sense of wellbeing, highlighting the need for medical educators to design into programmes formal support systems where medical students have the space and time they need to reflect on their emergent identities as a doctor. CONCLUSION: Medical educators should encourage students to reflect on their identity formation while encountering disorientating dilemmas. The inclusion of arts and humanities within the medical curriculum is strongly recommended to provide an avenue for students to access and express complex emotions and experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , Social Identification , Students, Medical/psychology
4.
5.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 28(5): 486-490, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891206

ABSTRACT

To assess variation in the way state health departments collect data on social identity, social needs, and vaccination status for people testing positive for COVID-19, we reviewed all state health department Web sites for COVID-19 disease reporting forms. We located forms for 39 states and coded each one for the presence and format of fields on race, ethnicity, disability, language, sexual and gender identity, comorbidities, pregnancy status, and social needs such as housing stability, occupation, and prior COVID-19 vaccination status. We find considerable variation in both type and format of data collected. For example, 10% of state forms have fields for race and ethnicity that are more disaggregated than the 5 US Census categories, 18% have fields on mental or physical ability, 37% have nonbinary or other fields for gender identity, 28% have fields on housing stability, and 15% have fields on vaccination status. Our findings suggest that national efforts to address COVID-19 may be limited by lack of standardization of data collection methods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Gender Identity , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , Social Identification , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
6.
Br J Soc Psychol ; 61(3): 907-923, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673011

ABSTRACT

Mutual aid groups have allowed community members to respond collectively to the COVID-19 pandemic, providing essential support to the vulnerable. While research has begun to explore the benefits of participating in these groups, there is a lack of work investigating who is likely to engage in this form of aid-giving, although early accounts suggest that existing volunteers have played a significant part in the mutual aid phenomena. Taking a social identity approach, the present study sought to identify what social psychological processes predict this continued engagement by exploring predictors of coordinated COVID-19 aid-giving for pre-existing volunteers. A two-wave longitudinal online survey study (N = 214) revealed that volunteer role identity among existing volunteers at T1 (pre-pandemic) was positively associated with volunteer-beneficiary between-group closeness at T1, which in turn was positively associated with community identification at T1. This in turn positively predicted coordinated COVID-19 aid-giving at T2 (3 months later). This paper therefore reveals the intra- and intergroup predictors of pandemic-related coordinated aid-giving in pre-existing volunteers. Implications for voluntary organisations and emergency voluntary aid provision are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Social Identification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Volunteers/psychology
7.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 517, 2022 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655570

ABSTRACT

Changing collective behaviour and supporting non-pharmaceutical interventions is an important component in mitigating virus transmission during a pandemic. In a large international collaboration (Study 1, N = 49,968 across 67 countries), we investigated self-reported factors associated with public health behaviours (e.g., spatial distancing and stricter hygiene) and endorsed public policy interventions (e.g., closing bars and restaurants) during the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic (April-May 2020). Respondents who reported identifying more strongly with their nation consistently reported greater engagement in public health behaviours and support for public health policies. Results were similar for representative and non-representative national samples. Study 2 (N = 42 countries) conceptually replicated the central finding using aggregate indices of national identity (obtained using the World Values Survey) and a measure of actual behaviour change during the pandemic (obtained from Google mobility reports). Higher levels of national identification prior to the pandemic predicted lower mobility during the early stage of the pandemic (r = -0.40). We discuss the potential implications of links between national identity, leadership, and public health for managing COVID-19 and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
Pandemics/legislation & jurisprudence , Public Health/legislation & jurisprudence , Social Conformity , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Cultural Comparison , Health Behavior , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Social Identification
8.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260973, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546976

ABSTRACT

Contact between people with similar opinions and characteristics occurs at a higher rate than among other people, a phenomenon known as homophily. The presence of clusters of unvaccinated people has been associated with increased incidence of infectious disease outbreaks despite high population-wide vaccination rates. The epidemiological consequences of homophily regarding other beliefs as well as correlations among beliefs or circumstances are poorly understood, however. Here, we use a simple compartmental disease model as well as a more complex COVID-19 model to study how homophily and correlation of beliefs and circumstances in a social interaction network affect the probability of disease outbreak and COVID-19-related mortality. We find that the current social context, characterized by the presence of homophily and correlations between who vaccinates, who engages in risk reduction, and individual risk status, corresponds to a situation with substantially worse disease burden than in the absence of heterogeneities. In the presence of an effective vaccine, the effects of homophily and correlation of beliefs and circumstances become stronger. Further, the optimal vaccination strategy depends on the degree of homophily regarding vaccination status as well as the relative level of risk mitigation high- and low-risk individuals practice. The developed methods are broadly applicable to any investigation in which node attributes in a graph might reasonably be expected to cluster or exhibit correlations.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Social Interaction , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Middle Aged , Social Identification , Social Networking , /statistics & numerical data
10.
Acad Med ; 96(11): 1580-1585, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501151

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Mentorship is valuable to medical students undergoing professional identity formation. Many institutions lack infrastructure to facilitate the personalized mentoring that supports students' integration of new professional identities with their personal identities and values. APPROACH: The authors developed a novel mentorship platform called Weave via a multistep, iterative design process, incorporating in-person and survey-based student and faculty feedback. Features of Weave include clear communication of mentorship offerings and expectations, plus opportunities to engage mentors based on professional and personal (identity-based) attributes. Faculty at Harvard Medical School who created a mentor profile within the first 3 months of launch and students who visited the website within the same period were invited to complete usability surveys in February 2019; students were invited to complete impact surveys in August 2020. OUTCOMES: Fifty-two of 132 invited faculty members (39.4%) and 80 of 185 students (43.2%) completed the usability surveys. Most of these faculty (86.5%) and students (73.8%) reported navigating the website was easy/very easy; 36 faculty (69.2%) created a mentor profile within 10 minutes. Key innovations highlighted by faculty and students were the listing of personal attributes and identities of diverse faculty; centralized, increased access to faculty mentors; ease of use; and provision of clear expectations. Nearly all students who completed the impact surveys agreed that Weave allowed them to connect with a faculty mentor whom they would not have found through other sources and to learn about the dimensions of diverse faculty. NEXT STEPS: Weave is a customizable online mentorship platform that fosters empowered vulnerability and increases dialogue between medical students and faculty based on professional and personal interests and identities. Weave may be expanded to other mentoring contexts and adapted for implementation at other institutions to help cultivate an institutional culture that values mentoring and to strengthen broader diversity and inclusion efforts.


Subject(s)
Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Mentoring/methods , Mentors/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Boston , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Communication , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Empowerment , Formative Feedback , Humans , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Schools, Medical/organization & administration , Social Identification , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457647

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes whether the degree of social identity and the degree of emotional connection influence the subjective well-being of individuals that participated in collective acts of support for health personnel fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic. Our sample was composed of 810 participants who resided in Spain (339 women and 471 men) with an average age of 34.22 (SD = 12.56). All of them frequently participated in the acts of support that took place each day of the lockdown decreed by the National Government on 14 March 2020. The results show that the greater identification with the group (the country) and the greater the emotional connection, the higher the scores obtained in subjective well-being. The results also show that emotional connection had a positive effect on emotional subjective well-being, mediated by the social identity activated in the collective act. The results are interpreted from the perspective of social identity that highlights the role played by social identity in influencing health and subjective well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Identification
12.
Rev. baiana enferm ; 35: e42883, 2021.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1365898

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: compreender as percepções dos profissionais de enfermagem em relação aos possíveis desfechos decorrentes da pandemia da COVID-19 para a profissão. Método: estudo de abordagem qualitativa, fundamentada na História Oral, mediante entrevista e aplicação de um questionário socioeconômico/profissional, realizado na unidade de internação de uma instituição de saúde de grande porte, localizada no município de São Paulo, capital do estado de São Paulo. Resultados: foram extraídas das entrevistas duas categorias relevantes: Crença no fortalecimento da enfermagem no pós-pandemia e Descrença na melhora da imagem da enfermagem no pós-pandemia. Considerações finais: as identidades profissionais são construídas mediante as interações sociais entre o eu (indivíduo) e o outro (grupos sociais e institucionais). Esta interação é marcada por conflitos que resultam na reconstrução desta identidade e com possíveis reflexos na prática profissional.


Objetivo: comprender las percepciones de los profesionales de enfermería sobre los posibles resultados derivados de la pandemia de COVID-19 para la profesión Método: estudio cualitativo, basado en la Historia Oral, a través de entrevistas y aplicación de un cuestionario socioeconómico/profesional, realizado en la unidad de hospitalización de una gran institución de salud, ubicada en la ciudad de São Paulo, capital del estado de São Paulo. Resultados: de las entrevistas se extrajeron dos categorías relevantes: Creencia en el fortalecimiento de la enfermería en el post-pandemia e Incredulidad en el mejoramiento de la imagen de enfermería en el post-pandemia. Consideraciones finales: las identidades profesionales se construyen a través de interacciones sociales entre la yo (individuo) y el otro (grupos sociales e institucionales). Esta interacción está marcada por conflictos que resultan en la reconstrucción de esta identidad y con posibles reflejos en la práctica profesional.


Objective: to understand the perceptions of nursing professionals in relation to possible outcomes resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic for the profession. Method: qualitative study, based on Oral History, through interviews and application of a socioeconomic/professional questionnaire, conducted in the hospitalization unit of a large health institution, located in the city of São Paulo, capital of the state of São Paulo. Results: two relevant categories were extracted from the interviews: Belief in the strengthening of nursing in the post-pandemic and Disbelief in the improvement of nursing image in the post-pandemic. Final considerations: professional identities are constructed through social interactions between the me (subject) and the other (social and institutional groups). This interaction is marked by conflicts that result in the reconstruction of this identity and with possible reflexes in professional practice.


Subject(s)
Humans , Perception , Social Identification , Nursing/trends , Pandemics/history , COVID-19/nursing
13.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e045520, 2021 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307913

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand identity tensions experienced by health professionals when patient partners join a quality improvement committee. DESIGN: Qualitative ethnographic study based on participatory observation. SETTING: An interdisciplinary quality improvement committee of a Canadian urban academic family medicine clinic with little previous experience in patient partnership. PARTICIPANTS: Two patient partners, seven health professionals (two family physicians, two residents, one pharmacist, one nurse clinician and one nurse practitioner) and three members of the administrative team. DATA COLLECTION: Data collection included compiled participatory observations, logbook notes and semi-structured interviews, collected between the summer of 2017 to the summer of 2019. DATA ANALYSIS: Ghadiri's identity threats theoretical framework was used to analyse qualitative material and to develop conceptualising categories, using QDA Miner software (V.5.0). RESULTS: All professionals with a clinical care role and patient partners (n=9) accepted to participate in the ethnographic study and semi-structured interviews (RR=100%). Transforming the 'caregiver-patient' relationship into a 'colleague-colleague' relationship generated identity upheavals among professionals. Identity tensions included competing ideals of the 'good professional', challenges to the impermeability of the patient and professional categories, the interweaving of symbols associated with one or the other of these identities, and the inner balance between the roles of caregiver and colleague. CONCLUSION: This research provides a new perspective on understanding how working in partnership with patients transform health professionals' identity. When they are called to work with patients outside of a simple therapeutic relationship, health professionals may feel tensions between their identity as caregivers and their identity as colleague. This allows us to better understand some underlying tensions elicited by the arrival of different patient engagement initiatives (eg, professionals' resistance to working with patients, patients' status and remuneration, professionals' concerns toward patient 'representativeness'). Partnership with patients imply the construction of a new relational framework, flexible and dynamic, that takes into account this coexistence of identities.


Subject(s)
Nurse Practitioners , Patient Participation , Canada , Humans , Qualitative Research , Social Identification
14.
J Soc Psychol ; 161(4): 435-451, 2021 Jul 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305390

ABSTRACT

The research presented here examined the relationship between the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, social group identity, intergroup contact, and prejudice. Utilizing a common ingroup identity approach, two datasets, which were composed of data from university students collected via online questionnaires before and after the onset of COVID-19, were combined (N = 511). Participants identified as either one of two subordinate student identities: domestic (i.e. U.S. citizen or permanent resident) or international (i.e. non-U.S. citizen or foreign resident), then reported on the strength of their subordinate and superordinate identity (university identity). Participants also reported on their contact experiences with outgroup members, outgroup stereotypes, and completed a novel intergroup bias task. Results indicated that after the onset of the pandemic, participants more strongly identified with the superordinate group, which predicted greater perceived intergroup contact and lower intergroup bias. Theoretical implications and future directions are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Interpersonal Relations , Prejudice/psychology , Social Identification , Students/psychology , Adult , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prejudice/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253195, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264228

ABSTRACT

With the COVID-19 pandemic still raging and the vaccination program still rolling out, there continues to be an immediate need for public health officials to better understand the mechanisms behind the deep and perpetual divide over face masks in America. Using a random sample of Americans (N = 615), following a pre-registered experimental design and analysis plan, we first demonstrated that mask wearers were not innately more cooperative as individuals than non-mask wearers in the Prisoners' Dilemma (PD) game when information about their own and the other person's mask usage was not salient. However, we found strong evidence of in-group favouritism among both mask and non-mask wearers when information about the other partner's mask usage was known. Non-mask wearers were 23 percentage points less likely to cooperate than mask wearers when facing a mask-wearing partner, and 26 percentage points more likely to cooperate than mask wearers when facing a non-mask-wearing partner. Our analysis suggests social identity effects as the primary reason behind people's decision whether to wear face masks during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Masks , Social Identification , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United States , Young Adult
16.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(4): 191-193, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249499

ABSTRACT

The effect on students from the COVID-19 pandemic, violence related to racism, and loss of customary school routines may cause loss of both school connection and a sense of belonging. School nurses can positively influence student belonging and school connection as they encounter students throughout in-person school and virtual school environments. School nurses build connections with students whom they know and outreach to students whom they identify as vulnerable in the areas of belonging and school connectedness. With a mind-set of the Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice and in collaboration with a school team implementing a multitiered system of support, school nurses intentionally outreach and cultural sensitivity to grow positive school climate that benefits students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Mentors/psychology , School Nursing/organization & administration , Social Identification , Students, Nursing/psychology , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Leadership , Nurse's Role , School Health Services/organization & administration , United States
17.
Br J Soc Psychol ; 60(4): 1403-1418, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221537

ABSTRACT

The role of shared identity in predicting both ingroup helping behaviour and adherence to protective norms during COVID-19 has been extensively theorized, but remains largely under-investigated. We build upon previous Social Identity research into community resilience by testing the role of pre-existing local community (or 'neighbourhood') identity as a predictor of these outcomes, via the mediator of perceived social support. Community residents in the UK completed a longitudinal online survey four months before lockdown (T1; N = 253), one month before lockdown (T2; N = 217), and two months into lockdown (T3; N = 149). The cross-lagged panel analysis shows that T1 community identification predicts T3 giving and receiving of pandemic-related support, and that these effects occur via the perception of community support at the second time point (while the alternative pathway from T1 support via T2 identification is non-significant). Moreover, we show that T1 community identification also directly predicts lockdown adherence at T3. Our findings point to the pivotal role played by community identity in effective behavioural responses to the pandemic, and the need to support and foster community development to facilitate local community resilience as the crisis continues to unfold.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Theoretical , Residence Characteristics , Social Identification , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
18.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(3): 330-344, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192097

ABSTRACT

In response to the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global health pandemic, many employees transitioned to remote work, which included remote meetings. With this sudden shift, workers and the media began discussing videoconference fatigue, a potentially new phenomenon of feeling tired and exhausted attributed to a videoconference. In the present study, we examine the nature of videoconference fatigue, when this phenomenon occurs, and what videoconference characteristics are associated with fatigue using a mixed-methods approach. Thematic analysis of qualitative responses indicates that videoconference fatigue exists, often in near temporal proximity to the videoconference, and is affected by various videoconference characteristics. Quantitative data were collected each hour during five workdays from 55 employees who were working remotely because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Latent growth modeling results suggest that videoconferences at different times of the day are related to deviations in employee fatigue beyond what is expected based on typical fatigue trajectories. Results from multilevel modeling of 279 videoconference meetings indicate that turning off the microphone and having higher feelings of group belongingness are related to lower postvideoconference fatigue. Additional analyses suggest that higher levels of group belongingness are the most consistent protective factor against videoconference fatigue. Such findings have immediate practical implications for workers and organizations as they continue to navigate the still relatively new terrain of remote work. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Fatigue/etiology , Social Identification , Social Isolation , Teleworking , Videoconferencing , Adolescent , Adult , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health , Protective Factors , Qualitative Research , Regression Analysis , Risk Factors , Young Adult
19.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(4): e25762, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186742

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health campaigns aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19 are important in reducing disease transmission, but traditional information-based campaigns have received unexpectedly extreme backlash. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate whether customizing of public service announcements (PSAs) providing health guidelines to match individuals' identities increases their compliance. METHODS: We conducted a within- and between-subjects, randomized controlled cross-sectional, web-based study in July 2020. Participants viewed two PSAs: one advocating wearing a mask in public settings and one advocating staying at home. The control PSA only provided information, and the treatment PSAs were designed to appeal to the identities held by individuals; that is, either a Christian identity or an economically motivated identity. Participants were asked about their identity and then provided a control PSA and treatment PSA matching their identity, in random order. The PSAs were of approximately 100 words. RESULTS: We recruited 300 social media users from Amazon Mechanical Turk in accordance with usual protocols to ensure data quality. In total, 8 failed the data quality checks, and the remaining 292 were included in the analysis. In the identity-based PSA, the source of the PSA was changed, and a phrase of approximately 12 words relevant to the individual's identity was inserted. A PSA tailored for Christians, when matched with a Christian identity, increased the likelihood of compliance by 12 percentage points. A PSA that focused on economic values, when shown to individuals who identified as economically motivated, increased the likelihood of compliance by 6 points. CONCLUSIONS: Using social media to deliver COVID-19 public health announcements customized to individuals' identities is a promising measure to increase compliance with public health guidelines. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN Registry 22331899; https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN22331899.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Persuasive Communication , Public Service Announcements as Topic , Social Identification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Quarantine , Social Media , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
J Contin Educ Health Prof ; 41(2): 124-129, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183044

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Fundamental quandaries of clinical and biomedical ethics for health care professionals, committees, and systems have been raised into stark relief by the COVID-19 pandemic. The nature and extent of critical issues raised by this ongoing crisis, including challenging ethical dilemmas for the health care profession, is likely to have an indelible impact on the professional identity formation (PIF) of learners and practitioners across the trajectory of the professional lifecycle. The lifelong process of PIF for health care practitioners, from learner through independent practice, is supported in medical education by intentional reflection, relationships within community of practice include guidance from mentoring, as well as resilience, both emotional and moral. We consider how grappling with ethical dilemmas related to the COVID-19 pandemic can challenge, inform, and even potentially transform the PIF process, thereby supporting development of a morally resilient, humanistic professional identity in health care trainees and health care professionals.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/ethics , Professional-Patient Relations/ethics , Self Concept , Ethics, Medical , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Morals , Professional Competence , Social Identification
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