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1.
Acta Paul. Enferm. (Online) ; 35: eAPE01406, 2022. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20234685

ABSTRACT

Resumo Objetivo Identificar, a partir das evidências presentes na literatura, os impactos da COVID-19 na saúde mental de mulheres grávidas. Métodos Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa da literatura, realizada nas bases de dados/biblioteca eletrônica MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBCOVID19 e MEDRXIV. A busca aconteceu de forma pareada no mês de dezembro de 2020, com artigos disponíveis na íntegra abordando a saúde mental das grávidas na pandemia. Resultados Os estudos que compuseram a amostra foram publicados entre os meses de abril e dezembro de 2020 e nos 10 estudos incluídos, a depressão e a ansiedade são apontados como fatores impactantes na saúde das gestantes, tendo como elementos contribuintes o medo da COVID-19, estresse e preocupações associadas à pandemia. Conclusão Houve impacto na saúde mental das gestantes na pandemia com repercussões de ordem psicossocial, socioeconômica e de assistência à saúde. Nesse contexto, a abordagem do componente psicológico na consulta de enfermagem pode fazer a diferença na atenção à gestação.


Resumen Objetivo Identificar, a partir de evidencias presentes en la literatura, los impactos del COVID-19 en la salud mental de mujeres embarazadas. Métodos Se trata de una revisión integradora de la literatura, realizada en las bases de datos/biblioteca electrónica MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBCOVID19 y MEDRXIV. La búsqueda se realizó de forma pareada en el mes de diciembre de 2020, con artículos con texto completo disponible que abordaban la salud mental de embarazadas en la pandemia. Resultados Los estudios que formaron la muestra fueron publicados entre los meses de abril y diciembre de 2020. En los diez estudios incluidos, la depresión y la ansiedad son señaladas como factores impactantes en la salud de las mujeres embarazadas, donde los elementos contribuyentes son el miedo al COVID-19, el estrés y las preocupaciones relacionadas con la pandemia. Conclusión Hubo impacto en la salud mental de las mujeres embarazadas en la pandemia, con repercusiones de orden psicosocial, socioeconómica y de atención a la salud. En este contexto, el enfoque del componente psicológico en la consulta de enfermería puede marcar una diferencia en la atención al embarazo.


Abstract Objective To identify the impacts of COVID-19 on pregnant women's mental health from evidence in the literature. Methods This is an integrative literature review performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PUBCOVID19 and MEDRXIV databases/electronic libraries. The search took place in pairs in December 2020, with articles available in full addressing pregnant women's mental health in the pandemic. Results The studies that made up the sample were published between April and December 2020 and in the ten studies included, depression and anxiety were identified as factors exerting impact on pregnant women's health, and the fear of COVID-19, stress and worries associated with the pandemic as contributing elements. Conclusion There was an impact on pregnant women's mental health in the pandemic with psychosocial, socioeconomic and health care repercussions. In this context, the approach to the psychological component in the nursing consultation can make a difference in pregnancy care.


Subject(s)
Humans , Social Isolation/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Women's Health , Pregnant Women , COVID-19/psychology , Anxiety , Delivery of Health Care
2.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1158716, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20231773

ABSTRACT

Objective: Social isolation and loneliness (SI/L) are considered critical public health issues. The primary objective of this scoping review is to document the experience of SI/L among older adults in Africa during the COVID-19 pandemic, given research gaps in this area. We identified the reasons for SI/L, the effects of SI/L, SI/L coping strategies, and research and policy gaps in SI/L experiences among older adults in Africa during COVID-19. Methods: Six databases (PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, APA PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Ageline) were used to identify studies reporting the experiences of SI/L among older adults in Africa during the COVID-19 lockdown. We adopted the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) methodology and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR). Results: Social isolation and loneliness due to COVID-19 in Africa affected older adults' mental, communal, spiritual, financial, and physical health. The use of technology was vital, as was the role of social networks within the family, community, religious groups, and government. Methodological challenges include the risk of selective survival bias, sampling biases, and limited inductive value due to context. Also, lack of large-scale mixed methods longitudinal studies to capture the experiences of older adults during COVID-19. There were essential policy gaps for African mental health support services, media programs, and community care service integration targeting older adults in the era of the COVID-19 lockdown. Discussion: Like in other countries, COVID-19 lockdown policies and the lockdown restrictions primarily caused the experience of SI/L among older adults in Africa. In African countries, they resulted in a severance of older adults from the cultural structure of care for older adults and their familial support systems. Weak government intervention, personal situations, challenges regarding technology, and detachment from daily activities, disproportionately affected older adults in Africa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , Humans , Aged , Loneliness/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Social Isolation/psychology , Africa
3.
Gerontology ; 69(5): 641-649, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240017

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Delaying the onset of disability is important for maintaining independence and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults. Given that social isolation is a significant risk factor for disability, effective means associated with social isolation are needed to alleviate disability. Although information and communication technology (ICT) may be a reasonable measure considering the recent social contexts due to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, further insights are required. This study aimed to investigate whether ICT use can alleviate the onset of disability in community-dwelling older adults with and without social isolation. METHODS: This longitudinal cohort study on 4,346 community-dwelling independent Japanese older adults (mean age, 73.5 ± 5.3 years) was conducted between 2017 and 2018. Participants were classified into four groups based on social isolation (the condition where two or more of the following measures were met: domestic isolation, less social contact, and social disengagement) and ICT users (those who had recently used a computer or a smartphone) and followed up to assess disability incidence for 24 months after baseline assessments. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to identify the effect of social isolation and ICT use on the risk of disability onset by adjusting for age, sex, education history, number of medications, eye disease, level of annual income, Mini-Mental State Examination, Geriatric Depression Scale 15, and gait speed. RESULTS: The group comprised nonsocial isolation and ICT users (44.7%), social isolation and ICT users (5.4%), nonsocial isolation and ICT nonusers (41.7%), and social isolation and ICT nonusers (8.2%). At the follow-up, 2.2%, 2.4%, 5.5%, and 12.4% of the participants in the above order developed disability (p < 0.01). Cox regression models revealed a significantly higher risk of disability onset in the social isolation and ICT nonusers group than in the social isolation and ICT users group (HR = 2.939; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.029-8.397; p = 0.044). In the subgroup analysis stratified by social isolation, ICT use significantly reduced the risk of disability onset in the socially isolated group (HR = 0.320; 95% CI 0.109-0.943; p = 0.039), although the same association was not observed in the nonsocially isolated group (HR = 0.845; 95% CI 0.565-1.264; p = 0.411). CONCLUSION: ICT use can alleviate the onset of disability in socially isolated older adults in a community setting. Considering ICT-applied methods for alleviating disability is beneficial for older adults in social isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Longitudinal Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Isolation , Cohort Studies , Independent Living , Communication , Technology
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239567

ABSTRACT

Loneliness has been linked to morbidity and mortality across the lifespan. Social media could reduce loneliness, though research on the relation between social media and loneliness has been inconclusive. This study used person-centered analyses to elucidate the inconsistencies in the literature and examine the possible role technology barriers played in the relation between social media use and loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (n = 929; M age = 57.58 ± 17.33) responded to a series of online questions covering demographics, loneliness, technology barriers, and social media use (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, etc.) across a range of devices (e.g., computer, smartphone, etc.). A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify distinct profiles of social media use, loneliness patterns, and age. Results yielded five distinct profiles characterized that showed no systematic associations among age, social media use, and loneliness. Demographic characteristics and technology barriers also differed between profiles and were associated with loneliness. In conclusion, person-centered analyses demonstrated distinct groups of older and younger adults that differed on social media use and loneliness and may offer more fruitful insights over variable-centered approaches (e.g., regression/correlation). Technology barriers may be a viable target for reducing loneliness in adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Loneliness , Pandemics , Fruit , Social Isolation
5.
Age Ageing ; 52(6)2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238635

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is little research conducted to systematically synthesize the evidence on psychological interventions for social isolation and loneliness among older adults during medical pandemics. This systematic review aims to address this information gap and provides guidance for planning and implementing interventions to prevent and reduce loneliness and social isolation for older adults, especially during medical pandemics. METHODS: Four electronic databases (EMBASE, PsychoInfo, Medline and Web of Science) and grey literature from 1 January 2000 to 13 September 2022 were searched for eligible studies on loneliness and social isolation. Data extraction and methodological quality assessment on key study characteristics were conducted independently by two researchers. Both qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis were used. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 3,116 titles. Of the 215 full texts reviewed, 12 intervention articles targeting loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic met the inclusion criteria. No studies were found concerning intervention with respect to social isolation. Overall, interventions targeting social skills and the elimination of negativities effectively alleviated the feelings of loneliness in the older population. However, they had only short-term effects. CONCLUSION: This review systematically summarised the key characteristics and the effectiveness of existing interventions addressing loneliness in older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future interventions should focus on social skills and eliminating negativities and be tailored to the needs and characteristics of older people. Repeated larger-scale randomized controlled trials and long-term effectiveness evaluations on this topic are warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , Humans , Aged , Loneliness/psychology , Pandemics , Psychosocial Intervention , COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology
6.
J Gerontol Nurs ; 49(6): 27-32, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240985

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and resulting instructions to stay home and social distance enhanced concerns of the impact of social isolation on the physical and mental well-being of older adults. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults participated in interviews describing their experiences early in the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants experienced loss of activities, routines, and social connection, and feelings of worry and uncertainty. Nevertheless, participants were hopeful about the future and demonstrated resilience in overcoming boredom as they became intentional in finding new activities and using technology to maintain connection with others. Older adults may need support in such situations to manage boredom and uncertainty and avoid social isolation. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 49(6), 27-32.].


Subject(s)
Boredom , COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , Uncertainty , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Social Isolation
7.
PLoS One ; 18(5): e0285797, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325003

ABSTRACT

The need for physical distancing due to COVID-19 mitigation efforts forced prolonged social isolation, which may affect sleep and lead to mental health problems. Previous research has shown that young adults are particularly vulnerable to psychological stress caused by social isolation, the negative psychological impact of the pandemic, and greater frequency and severity of sleep problems. Therefore, the main goal of the present study was to examine whether insomnia could constitute a mediation mechanism that explains the relationship between social isolation experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic and mental health outcomes (depression and anxiety) reported up to 1.5 years later. The study was conducted among young (M±SD; 24.08±3.75) men (N = 1025) in Poland. Data were collected by means of self-report questionnaires, including The Social Isolation Index, The Athens Insomnia Scale, The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II). The results show that insomnia mediates the relationships between social isolation and both anxiety and depression. The current findings emphasize the role of insomnia in the relationships between social isolation experienced during COVID-19 and negative emotional states. From a clinical perspective, the results suggest that implementing therapeutic components that address social isolation in insomnia treatment programs may prevent the development of depression and anxiety symptoms among young men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Male , Young Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology
8.
Eur Psychiatry ; 63(1): e58, 2020 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317414

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has forced governments to implement strict social mitigation strategies to reduce the morbidity and mortality from acute infections. These strategies, however, carry a significant risk for mental health, which can lead to increased short-term and long-term mortality and is currently not included in modeling the impact of the pandemic. METHODS: We used years of life lost (YLL) as the main outcome measure, applied to Switzerland as an example. We focused on suicide, depression, alcohol use disorder, childhood trauma due to domestic violence, changes in marital status, and social isolation, as these are known to increase YLL in the context of imposed restriction in social contact and freedom of movement. We stipulated a minimum duration of mitigation of 3 months based on current public health plans. RESULTS: The study projects that the average person would suffer 0.205 YLL due to psychosocial consequence of COVID-19 mitigation measures. However, this loss would be entirely borne by 2.1% of the population, who will suffer an average of 9.79 YLL. CONCLUSIONS: The results presented here are likely to underestimate the true impact of the mitigation strategies on YLL. However, they highlight the need for public health models to expand their scope in order to provide better estimates of the risks and benefits of mitigation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Risk Assessment , Switzerland/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
Eur Psychiatry ; 63(1): e61, 2020 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313894

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic has forced many people into self-isolation and to practice social distancing. When people are physically isolated and distant from each other, technology may play a fundamental role by enabling social connection and reducing feelings of loneliness caused by this prolonged social isolation. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many mental health services worldwide have had to shift their routine face-to-face outpatient appointments to remote telepsychiatry encounters. The increased pressure on mental health services highlights the importance of community-led health-promotion interventions, which can contribute to preventing mental illness or their relapses, and to reduce the burden on health services. Patients with psychosis are particularly socially isolated, have sedentary lifestyles, and commonly face stigma and discrimination from the general population. At the same time, patients with psychosis value technology, are interested in, use and own smart-phones to digitally connect, and are satisfied with their use. Thus, among psychosocial interventions, a helpful resource may be "Phone Pal," a complex intervention which facilitates remote communication between volunteers and socially isolated patients with psychosis through different smart-phone tools. While "Phone Pal" has been originally developed for people with psychosis, it may also be useful to the wider population, helping to overcome the social isolation caused by physical distancing, particularly in these times of widespread isolation. "Phone Pal" may be a potential public health resource for society, providing important support to those that may need it the most, and possibly benefit most from it.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Loneliness/psychology , Mental Health Services , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychotic Disorders/psychology , Smartphone , Social Isolation/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19 , Communication , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Social Stigma , Telemedicine/instrumentation
10.
Scand J Public Health ; 51(5): 744-753, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317759

ABSTRACT

AIM: The main aim of this study was to examine leisure engagement and loneliness among older adults before and during the COVID-19 pandemic by analysing population-based data from western Finland and northern Sweden. METHODS: The data originated from the Gerontological Regional Database (GERDA) postal questionnaire study conducted in 2016 (n=7996) and 2021 (n=8148) among older adults aged 65, 70, 75, 80 and 85 years. Associations between loneliness and leisure engagement were analysed using logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 10% and 9% of the older adults reported loneliness in 2016 and 2021, respectively. The results showed that a lack of engagement in socialising and pleasure was independently associated with loneliness in both study years, while a lack of engagement in cultural activities was associated with loneliness in 2016 only. In 2021, the likelihood of experiencing loneliness was higher in the Finnish region than in the Swedish region. In addition, those reporting a decrease in hobby and socialising leisure activities due to the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to report loneliness. CONCLUSIONS: Most leisure activities decreased during the pandemic, suggesting an increase in social isolation. However, this did not reflect an increase in loneliness in the studied regions. The evidence suggests that leisure engagement, especially socialising activities, continued to be important for well-being among older adults during the pandemic. Further, loneliness was affected by contextual factors as well as individual-level characteristics. Thus, according to the measures reported here, the pandemic seemed to have a slightly weakened well-being impact in Finland.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Social Isolation , Leisure Activities
11.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 7748, 2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317117

ABSTRACT

Prenatal experiences can influence offspring physiology and behaviour through the lifespan. Various forms of prenatal stress impair adult learning and memory function and can lead to increased occurrence of anxiety and depression. Clinical work suggests that prenatal stress and maternal depression lead to similar outcomes in children and adolescents, however the long-term effects of maternal depression are less established, particularly in well controlled animal models. Social isolation is common in depressed individuals and during the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Accordingly, for this study we were interested in the effects of maternal stress induced via social isolation on adult offspring cognitive functions including spatial, stimulus-response, and emotional learning and memory that are mediated by different networks centered on the hippocampus, dorsal striatum, and amygdala, respectively. Tasks included a discriminative contextual fear conditioning task and cue-place water task. Pregnant dams in the social isolation group were single housed prior to and throughout gestation. Once offspring reached adulthood the male offspring were trained on a contextual fear conditioning task in which rats were trained to associate one of two contexts with an aversive stimulus and the opposing context remained neutral. Afterwards a cue-place water task was performed during which they were required to navigate to both a visible and invisible platform. Fear conditioning results revealed that the adult offspring of socially isolated mothers, but not controls, were impaired in associating a specific context with a fear-inducing stimulus as assessed by conditioned freezing and avoidance. Results from the water task indicate that adult offspring of mothers that were socially isolated showed place learning deficits but not stimulus-response habit learning on the same task. These cognitive impairments, in the offspring of socially isolated dams, occurred in the absence of maternal elevated stress hormone levels, anxiety, or altered mothering. Some evidence suggested that maternal blood-glucose levels were altered particularly during gestation. Our results provide further support for the idea that learning and memory networks, centered on the amygdala and hippocampus are particularly susceptible to the negative impacts of maternal social isolation and these effects can occur without elevated glucocorticoid levels associated with other forms of prenatal stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects , Pregnancy , Female , Rats , Male , Humans , Animals , Rodentia , Adult Children , Pandemics , Cognition , Social Isolation
12.
Nutrients ; 15(9)2023 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314156

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in economic, social, and behavioral changes in people, which may favor several long-term consequences. This study evaluated the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on eating behavior and mental health in the final phase of social isolation. This cross-sectional study included 756 adults that completed an online questionnaire. Individuals were stratified into those who had been infected with COVID-19 (GCOV) and those who did not (GNCOV). The GCOV group had higher weight (p = 0.013), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.005), anxiety levels (p = 0.040), sleep disorders (p = 0.009), and poorer sleep quality (p = 0.0028). In the GCOV, the consumption of ultra-processed foods was associated with higher anxiety levels and poorer sleep quality. A higher proportion of individuals who consumed more than five servings of in natura food was observed in the group with taste and olfactory dysfunction than in the group without. Obesity contributes to uncontrolled and emotional eating disorders, increased anxiety, and worsened sleep. Therefore, COVID-19 impaired mental health and eating behavior even in the long term. These changes were potentiated by the presence of obesity and consumption of ultra-processed foods, evidencing the importance of monitoring these individuals even after the resolution of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Quality , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior , Social Isolation , Anxiety/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology
13.
HERD ; 16(3): 61-82, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320902

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We explored the importance of environmental and mobility strategies during early COVID-19 by age and ethnicity and investigated predictors of park visitations considering the COVID-19 impacts. BACKGROUND: Parks are safe and accessible venues to stay active and reduce social isolation, which is especially important considering COVID-19 and the associated lockdowns. METHODS: We analyzed online survey data from 683 residents (collected July 2020) of El Paso, TX, and objective measures of neighborhood park characteristics. Chi-square tests and mixed-effects logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the environmental/mobility strategies, personal and environmental factors, and park visitations, considering the COVID-19 impacts. RESULTS: The percentage of those who visited (1+ times/week) parks or trails/paths in the neighborhood dropped from 41.7% to 19.5% since the start of COVID-19 (OR = 0.015, p < .001). Before COVID-19, middle-aged and older adults were less likely to visit parks than younger adults, while this difference became insignificant during early COVID-19. Hispanic adults were more likely to visit parks than non-Hispanics both before and during early COVID-19. Positive environmental predictors of park visitations included park availability in the neighborhood, proximity to the closest park, seeing people being physically active in the neighborhood, and neighborhood aesthetics. CONCLUSIONS: Proximately located parks, trails, and paths well integrated into residential communities, and high aesthetic quality of the neighborhood are the potential features of pandemic-resilient communities and should be considered an important national priority to maintain and promote the health and well-being of the population, especially during pandemics like COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Environment Design , Parks, Recreational , Recreation , Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Environment Design/statistics & numerical data , Hispanic or Latino/statistics & numerical data , Residence Characteristics/statistics & numerical data , Social Isolation , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Parks, Recreational/statistics & numerical data
14.
Healthc Q ; 26(1): 14-17, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319084

ABSTRACT

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, two interdisciplinary pan-Canadian research initiatives have illuminated the social isolation and loneliness of seniors who age at home. The National Institute on Ageing at Toronto Metropolitan University and the Canadian Coalition for Seniors' Mental Health are exemplars in how to treat healthcare innovations as opportunities to create a sustainable high-quality healthcare system. Knowledge translation and communication with the public are core to the values and strategy of both organizations. Clinician leaders at these organizations take a holistic approach to understanding and communicating the importance of social isolation and loneliness among seniors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Aged , Canada , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Social Isolation , Aging
15.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e23, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315150

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the experiences of caregivers of children with tracheostomies. DESIGN: Qualitative semistructured interviews. SETTING: All participants were currently, or had previously cared for, a tracheostomised child who had attended a tertiary care centre in the North of England. Health professionals were purposively sampled to include accounts from a range of professions from primary, community, secondary and tertiary care. PARTICIPANTS: Carers of children with tracheostomies (n=34), including health professionals (n=17) and parents (n=17). INTERVENTIONS: Interviews were undertaken between July 2020 and February 2021 by telephone or video link. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Qualitative reflexive thematic analysis with QSR NVivo V.12. RESULTS: The pandemic has presented an additional and, for some, substantial challenge when caring for tracheostomised children, but this was not always felt to be the most overriding concern. Interviews demonstrated rapid adaptation, normalisation and varying degrees of stoicism and citizenship around constantly changing pandemic-related requirements, rules and regulations. This paper focuses on four key themes: 'reconceptualising safe care and safe places'; 'disrupted support and isolation'; 'relationships, trust and communication'; and 'coping with uncertainty and shifting boundaries of responsibility'. These are described within the context of the impact on the child, the emotional and physical well-being of carers and the challenges to maintaining the values of family-centred care. CONCLUSIONS: As we move to the next phase of the pandemic, we need to understand the impact on vulnerable groups so that their needs can be prioritised.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Parents/psychology , Tracheostomy , Adaptation, Psychological , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Professional-Family Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Social Support , Trust
16.
Immun Inflamm Dis ; 9(2): 561-568, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2320071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The lockdown imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a completely different style of life with possible effects on the attitude toward their disease in patients with chronic lung disease, such as asthma. The aim of our study was to investigate in asthmatic children the level of asthma control and the maintenance therapy used during the lockdown. METHODS: Among asthmatic children attending our clinic, we identified those who had been prescribed the same therapy in March-April 2019 and March-April 2020. The level of asthma control (GINA-score) and the maintenance therapy used during the lockdown (March-April 2020) were compared with those of March-April 2019. We separately analyzed a small group of children with severe asthma treated with Omalizumab during the lockdown. RESULTS: We enrolled 92 asthmatic children (67 males). Compared to 2019, in 2020 a higher proportion of children modified their maintenance therapy (38% vs. 15.2%, p < .001), with a significant increase in both the proportion of children who increased (p = .033) and in that of children who decreased their therapy (p = .026). The level of control resulted as significantly higher in 2020 (March p = .023; April p = .007). Also, the 13 children treated with Omalizumab showed a good level of control in 2020. CONCLUSIONS: In asthmatic children, the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown had a significant impact on their asthma control and on their attitude toward maintenance therapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Asthmatic Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Omalizumab/therapeutic use , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Asthma/epidemiology , Asthma/psychology , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Maintenance Chemotherapy , Male , Retrospective Studies , Rhinitis, Allergic/epidemiology , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
J Affect Disord ; 334: 43-49, 2023 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2311986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to characterize the prevalence of social disconnection and thoughts of suicide among older adults in the United States, and examine the association between them in a large naturalistic study. METHODS: We analyzed data from 6 waves of a fifty-state non-probability survey among US adults conducted between February and December 2021. The internet-based survey collected the PHQ-9, as well as multiple measures of social connectedness. We applied multiple logistic regression to analyze the association between presence of thoughts of suicide and social disconnection. Exploratory analysis, using generalized random forests, examined heterogeneity of effects across sociodemographic groups. RESULTS: Of 16,164 survey respondents age 65 and older, mean age was 70.9 (SD 5.0); the cohort was 61.4 % female and 29.6 % male; 2.0 % Asian, 6.7 % Black, 2.2 % Hispanic, and 86.8 % White. A total of 1144 (7.1 %) reported thoughts of suicide at least several days in the prior 2 week period. In models adjusted for sociodemographic features, households with 3 or more additional members (adjusted OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.28-2.33) and lack of social supports, particularly emotional supports (adjusted OR 2.60, 95 % CI 2.09-3.23), were independently associated with greater likelihood of reporting such thoughts, as was greater reported loneliness (adjusted OR 1.75, 95 % CI 1.64-1.87). The effects of emotional support varied significantly across sociodemographic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Thoughts of suicide are common among older adults in the US, and associated with lack of social support, but not with living alone. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NA.


Subject(s)
Social Isolation , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Loneliness/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Suicide/psychology , United States/epidemiology
19.
Motriz (Online) ; 27: e10200200, 2021.
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2292910

ABSTRACT

Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic had an impact in several areas, and in scientific research was not different. Researchers are working from their homes since research facilities and universities were closed, and face-to-face interaction where limited to stop the virus spread. This brought a lot of changes in observational studies, especially in epidemiology research. Since most studies are being conducted through internet-based assessments, researchers are facing different challenges regarding data collection and participants recruitment, for example. In this paper, we share some of the challenges faced in a population-based study conducted in Southern Brazil, as well as possible alternatives to help researchers to overcome these issues.


Subject(s)
Social Isolation , Health Care Surveys/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Collection/supply & distribution
20.
Psychogeriatrics ; 23(4): 561-570, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social distancing and 'stay-at-home' orders are essential to contain the coronavirus outbreak; however, it has affected older adults very negatively psychosocially. The present study explored the impact of a videoconferencing-implemented program on older adults' psychosocial health during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We carried out this experimental research with pretest-posttest and control groups between November 02 to December 26, 2020 on individuals aged 60 years and over who were enrolled at Fethiye Refreshment University (60+ FRU). While the intervention group consisted of 40 people, we recruited 52 participants in the control group. Unlike the control group, the intervention group participated in a structured videoconferencing program held there days a week for 8 weeks. We collected the data using the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPS), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21), and the Loneliness Scale for Elderly (LSE). The data were then analysed on the SPSS 22.0 program. RESULTS: The participants had a mean age of 66.13 ± 5.13 years; 65.2% were females, 58.7% were married, 55.4% held a university degree and 93.5% had a regular income. Following the intervention, we found the experimental group to have significantly a lower posttest FCV-19S score (p < 0.05) and a higher posttest MSPS score than the control group (p < 0.05). Besides, the experimental group had significantly lower posttest scores on the DASS-21 and the anxiety and stress subscales than the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the posttest score of the experiential group on the emotional loneliness subscale (LSE) was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group (p < 0.05); nevertheless, we could not conclude significant differences between the groups' pretest and posttest LSE scores and their scores on the other LSE subscales (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Overall, the videoconferencing program was found to be efficient in providing older adults with psychosocial support amid social isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Male , Pandemics , Social Isolation/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Videoconferencing
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