Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 44
Filter
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686716

ABSTRACT

The goal of the present study is to examine the psychology of working framework/theory with a sample of Korean workers. This study examined the structural model of sociocultural factors (i.e., economic constraints and social marginalization), psychological variables (i.e., work volition and career adaptability), and outcomes of decent work based on the psychology of working framework. This study assumed that decent work helps all workers attain a sense of self-respect, dignity, experience freedom and security in the work environment and provides an opportunity for workers to contribute to society. Data were collected from 420 Korean workers, with an average age of 39.13 years (SD = 9.26). We used a hypothesis model that did not assume a direct path from economic constraints and social marginalization to decent work and work volition and career adaptation to job satisfaction and life satisfaction. We also employed an alternative model that assumed all of its paths and compared the models' goodness of fit based on prior studies. Results indicated that alternative models have higher goodness of fit than hypothesis models. All path coefficients were significant except for the direct path from social marginalization to work volition and career adaptability to life satisfaction. Additionally, work volition and career adaptability mediated both the relationship between social marginalization and job satisfaction and between marginalization and life satisfaction. This study enabled the comprehensive examination of the relevance of various social environments and psychological and occupational characteristics that should be considered when exploring job or life satisfaction in the process of career counseling.


Subject(s)
Job Satisfaction , Occupations , Adult , Humans , Republic of Korea , Social Marginalization/psychology , Workplace/psychology
5.
Int J Public Health ; 66: 1604036, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497191

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Many countries recently approved a number of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. There is therefore growing optimism around the world about their future availability and effectiveness. However, supplies are likely to be limited and restricted to certain categories of individuals, at least initially. Thus, governments have suggested prioritization schemes to allocate such limited supplies. The majority of such schemes are said to be developed to safeguard the weakest sections of society; that is, healthcare personnel and the elderly. Methods: In this work, we analyse three case studies (incarcerated people; homeless people, asylum seekers and undocumented migrants). We propose a bioethical argument that frames the discussion by describing the salient facts about each of the three populations and then argue that these characteristics entail inclusion and prioritization in the queue for vaccination in their country of residence. Results: Through an analysis informed by ethical considerations revolving around the concepts of fairness and equality, we try to raise awareness of these important issues among decision makers. Conclusion: Our goal is to advocate for the development of more inclusive policies and frameworks in SARS-CoV-2 vaccine allocation and, in general, in all scenarios in which there is a shortage of optimal care and treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Consumer Advocacy , Health Care Rationing , Vulnerable Populations , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Humans , Refugees , Social Marginalization , Vaccination
10.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 45, 2021 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248345

ABSTRACT

This Covid-19 pandemic has been a trying time for all countries, governments, societies, and individuals. The physical, social, and organizational infrastructure of healthcare systems across the world is being stressed. This pandemic has highlighted that the healthcare of the country is as strong as its weakest link and that no aspect of life, be it social or economic, is spared from this pandemic. The authors would like to highlight some of the lessons learned from Singapores management of the Covid-19 pandemic. During the Singaporean Covid-19 pandemic, public health policy planning was all encompassing in its coverage, involving various stakeholders in government and society. The important role of individuals, governments, industry, and primary healthcare practitioners when tackling COVID-19 are highlighted. Singapores management of the Covid-19 pandemic involved an approach that involved the whole of society, with a particular focus on supporting the vulnerable foreign worker population, which formed the majority of Covid-19 cases in the country. Hopefully amidst the trying times, valuable lessons are learnt that will be etched into medical history and collective memory. We hope to highlight these lessons for future generations, both for members of the public and fellow healthcare practitioners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , Public Policy , Social Marginalization , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Civil Defense/standards , Government Regulation , Health Services Needs and Demand/organization & administration , Humans , Public Health/methods , Public Health/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data
11.
Indian J Med Ethics ; V(4): 1-14, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239247

ABSTRACT

The spread of Covid-19 and the lockdown have brought in acute deprivation for rural, marginalised communities with loss of wages, returnee migrants and additional state-imposed barriers to accessing facilities and public provisions. Patriarchal norms amplified in such a crisis along with gender-blind state welfare policies have rendered women in these communities "invisible". This has impacted their access to healthcare, nutrition and social security, and significantly increased their unpaid work burden. Several manifestations of violence, and mental stress have surfaced, diminishing their bare minimum agency and rights and impacting their overall health and wellbeing. This article looks at these gendered implications in the context of rural, tribal and high migrant areas of South Rajasthan. We have adopted an intersectional approach to highlight how intersections of several structures across multiple sites of power: the public, the private space of the home and the woman's intimate space, have reduced them to ultra-vulnerable groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Rural Population , Social Marginalization , Vulnerable Populations/ethnology , Women , Female , Humans , India/ethnology , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Lancet Planet Health ; 5(5): e309-e315, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219222

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is unique in the scope of its effects on morbidity and mortality. However, the factors contributing to its disparate racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic effects are part of an expansive and continuous history of oppressive social policy and marginalising geopolitics. This history is characterised by institutionally generated spatial inequalities forged through processes of residential segregation and neglectful urban planning. In the USA, aspects of COVID-19's manifestation closely mirror elements of the build-up and response to the Flint crisis, Michigan's racially and class-contoured water crisis that began in 2014, and to other prominent environmental injustice cases, such as the 1995 Chicago (IL, USA) heatwave that severely affected the city's south and west sides, predominantly inhabited by Black people. Each case shares common macrosocial and spatial characteristics and is instructive in showing how civic trust suffers in the aftermath of public health disasters, becoming especially degenerative among historically and spatially marginalised populations. Offering a commentary on the sociogeographical dynamics that gave rise to these crises and this institutional distrust, we discuss how COVID-19 has both inherited and augmented patterns of spatial inequality. We conclude by outlining particular steps that can be taken to prevent and reduce spatial inequalities generated by COVID-19, and by discussing the preliminary steps to restore trust between historically disenfranchised communities and the public officials and institutions tasked with responding to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
African Americans , Disasters , Environmental Exposure , Healthcare Disparities , Public Health , Cities , Humans , Residence Characteristics , Social Determinants of Health , Social Marginalization , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(5): e218799, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210566

ABSTRACT

Importance: Socioeconomically marginalized communities have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Income inequality may be a risk factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection and death from COVID-19. Objective: To evaluate the association between county-level income inequality and COVID-19 cases and deaths from March 2020 through February 2021 in bimonthly time epochs. Design, Setting, and Participants: This ecological cohort study used longitudinal data on county-level COVID-19 cases and deaths from March 1, 2020, through February 28, 2021, in 3220 counties from all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. Main Outcomes and Measures: County-level daily COVID-19 case and death data from March 1, 2020, through February 28, 2021, were extracted from the COVID-19 Data Repository by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Exposure: The Gini coefficient, a measure of unequal income distribution (presented as a value between 0 and 1, where 0 represents a perfectly equal geographical region where all income is equally shared and 1 represents a perfectly unequal society where all income is earned by 1 individual), and other county-level data were obtained primarily from the 2014 to 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. Covariates included median proportions of poverty, age, race/ethnicity, crowding given by occupancy per room, urbanicity and rurality, educational level, number of physicians per 100 000 individuals, state, and mask use at the county level. Results: As of February 28, 2021, on average, each county recorded a median of 8891 cases of COVID-19 per 100 000 individuals (interquartile range, 6935-10 666 cases per 100 000 individuals) and 156 deaths per 100 000 individuals (interquartile range, 94-228 deaths per 100 000 individuals). The median county-level Gini coefficient was 0.44 (interquartile range, 0.42-0.47). There was a positive correlation between Gini coefficients and county-level COVID-19 cases (Spearman ρ = 0.052; P < .001) and deaths (Spearman ρ = 0.134; P < .001) during the study period. This association varied over time; each 0.05-unit increase in Gini coefficient was associated with an adjusted relative risk of COVID-19 deaths: 1.25 (95% CI, 1.17-1.33) in March and April 2020, 1.20 (95% CI, 1.13-1.28) in May and June 2020, 1.46 (95% CI, 1.37-1.55) in July and August 2020, 1.04 (95% CI, 0.98-1.10) in September and October 2020, 0.76 (95% CI, 0.72-0.81) in November and December 2020, and 1.02 (95% CI, 0.96-1.07) in January and February 2021 (P < .001 for interaction). The adjusted association of the Gini coefficient with COVID-19 cases also reached a peak in July and August 2020 (relative risk, 1.28 [95% CI, 1.22-1.33]). Conclusions and Relevance: This study suggests that income inequality within US counties was associated with more cases and deaths due to COVID-19 in the summer months of 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the vast disparities that exist in health outcomes owing to income inequality in the US. Targeted interventions should be focused on areas of income inequality to both flatten the curve and lessen the burden of inequality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Income/statistics & numerical data , Socioeconomic Factors , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health , Social Marginalization , United States/epidemiology
15.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 51(2): 6-9, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173808

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has revealed myriad social, economic, and health inequities that disproportionately burden populations that have been made medically or socially vulnerable. Inspired by state and local governments that declared racism a public health crisis or emergency, the Anti-Racism in Public Health Act of 2020 reflects a shifting paradigm in which racism is considered a social determinant of health. Indeed, health inequities fundamentally rooted in structural racism have been exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic, which calls for the integration of antiracist praxis to promote ethical public health research processes. This commentary describes ways in which antiracist praxis-which emphasizes empowerment of traditionally marginalized populations-offers strategies to explicitly address power imbalance, stigmatization, and other consequences of structural racism in public health research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Public Health , Racism , Social Determinants of Health , Codes of Ethics , Humans , Public Health/ethics , Public Health/methods , Public Health/standards , Racism/prevention & control , Racism/trends , Social Determinants of Health/ethics , Social Determinants of Health/standards , Social Discrimination/prevention & control , Social Marginalization , United States
16.
J Trauma Dissociation ; 22(2): 135-140, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132308
17.
Am J Public Health ; 111(4): 588-589, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133762
20.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e042647, 2020 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004171

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 outbreak in Singapore has largely centred around migrant worker dormitories, comprising over 90% of all cases in the country. Dormitories are home to a culturally and linguistically distinct, low-income population, without on-site healthcare after-hours. The primary objective of this study was to assess the engagement and utilisation of a simple, low-cost, accessible, mobile health solution for remote self-reporting of vital parameters in dormitory residents with COVID-19. DESIGN: Retrospective review of medical care. SETTING: Two large migrant worker dormitories with a combined population of 31 546. PARTICIPANTS: All COVID-19-affected residents housed in dormitories during the study period. INTERVENTION: All residents were taught to use a chat assistant to self-report their temperature, heart rate and oxygen saturations. Results flowed into a dashboard, which alerted clinicians of abnormal results. OUTCOMES: The primary outcome measure was engagement rate. This was derived from the total number of residents who registered on the platform over the total number of COVID-19-affected residents in the dormitories during the study period. Secondary outcome measures included outcomes of the alerts and subsequent escalations of care. RESULTS: 800 of the 931 COVID-19-affected residents (85.9%) engaged with the platform to log a total of 12 511 discrete episodes of vital signs. Among 372 abnormal readings, 96 teleconsultations were initiated, of which 7 (1.8%) were escalated to emergency services and 18 (4.9%) were triaged to earlier physical medical review on-site. CONCLUSIONS: A chat-assistant-based self-reporting platform is an effective and safe community-based intervention to monitor marginalised populations with distinct cultural and linguistic backgrounds, living communally and affected by COVID-19. Lessons learnt from this approach may be applied to develop safe and cost-effective telemedicine solutions across similar settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Health Services Accessibility , Housing/organization & administration , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention , Male , Remote Consultation/economics , Remote Consultation/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Social Marginalization , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL