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1.
Rom J Ophthalmol ; 65(2): 125-129, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285635

ABSTRACT

Social Media in the COVID-19 pandemic context has become a real dissemination medium of ophthalmology information for both physicians and health care consumers. This trend of sharing information has revealed new and innovative interventions in Ophthalmology such as teleophthalmology on Social Media by providing synchronous and asynchronous consultations, education, and prevention solutions as well as scientific research findings. This paper is a review of the current challenges and limitations faced by ophthalmologists and health care consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Consumer Health Information , Information Dissemination/methods , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/organization & administration , Health Information Systems , Humans , Information Centers , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine
3.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 21(4): 561-564, 2020 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005372

ABSTRACT

Social Media usage has been shown to increase in situations of natural disaster and other crises. It is crucial for the scientific community to understand how social media works in order to enhance our capabilities and make a more resilient community. Through social media communication, the scientific community can collaborate around the globe in a faster way the most important findings of a disease, with a decreased knowledge transition time to other healthcare providers (HCPs). This is greatly important to coordinate research and knowledge during a time of uncertainty and protentional fake news. During the 2020 global pandemic, social media has become an ally but also a potential threat. High volumes of information compressed into a short period can result in overwhelmed HCPs trying to discern fact from noise. A major limitation of social media currently is the ability to quickly disseminate false information which can confuse and distract. Society relies on educated scientists and physicians to be leaders in delivering fact-based information to the public. For this reason, in times of crises it is important to be leaders in the conversation of social media to guide correct and helpful information and knowledge to the masses looking for answers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/organization & administration , Humans
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e21820, 2020 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616134

ABSTRACT

In this issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research, the World Health Organization (WHO) is presenting a framework for managing the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infodemic. Infodemiology is now acknowledged by public health organizations and the WHO as an important emerging scientific field and critical area of practice during a pandemic. From the perspective of being the first "infodemiologist" who originally coined the term almost two decades ago, I am positing four pillars of infodemic management: (1) information monitoring (infoveillance); (2) building eHealth Literacy and science literacy capacity; (3) encouraging knowledge refinement and quality improvement processes such as fact checking and peer-review; and (4) accurate and timely knowledge translation, minimizing distorting factors such as political or commercial influences. In the current COVID-19 pandemic, the United Nations has advocated that facts and science should be promoted and that these constitute the antidote to the current infodemic. This is in stark contrast to the realities of infodemic mismanagement and misguided upstream filtering, where social media platforms such as Twitter have advertising policies that sideline science organizations and science publishers, treating peer-reviewed science as "inappropriate content."


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Health Education/methods , Health Education/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Public Health/methods , Social Media/organization & administration , Social Media/standards , World Health Organization/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Education/standards , Health Literacy , Humans , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Politics , Public Health/education , Public Health/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/supply & distribution
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e19659, 2020 06 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-607410

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An infodemic is an overabundance of information-some accurate and some not-that occurs during an epidemic. In a similar manner to an epidemic, it spreads between humans via digital and physical information systems. It makes it hard for people to find trustworthy sources and reliable guidance when they need it. OBJECTIVE: A World Health Organization (WHO) technical consultation on responding to the infodemic related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic was held, entirely online, to crowdsource suggested actions for a framework for infodemic management. METHODS: A group of policy makers, public health professionals, researchers, students, and other concerned stakeholders was joined by representatives of the media, social media platforms, various private sector organizations, and civil society to suggest and discuss actions for all parts of society, and multiple related professional and scientific disciplines, methods, and technologies. A total of 594 ideas for actions were crowdsourced online during the discussions and consolidated into suggestions for an infodemic management framework. RESULTS: The analysis team distilled the suggestions into a set of 50 proposed actions for a framework for managing infodemics in health emergencies. The consultation revealed six policy implications to consider. First, interventions and messages must be based on science and evidence, and must reach citizens and enable them to make informed decisions on how to protect themselves and their communities in a health emergency. Second, knowledge should be translated into actionable behavior-change messages, presented in ways that are understood by and accessible to all individuals in all parts of all societies. Third, governments should reach out to key communities to ensure their concerns and information needs are understood, tailoring advice and messages to address the audiences they represent. Fourth, to strengthen the analysis and amplification of information impact, strategic partnerships should be formed across all sectors, including but not limited to the social media and technology sectors, academia, and civil society. Fifth, health authorities should ensure that these actions are informed by reliable information that helps them understand the circulating narratives and changes in the flow of information, questions, and misinformation in communities. Sixth, following experiences to date in responding to the COVID-19 infodemic and the lessons from other disease outbreaks, infodemic management approaches should be further developed to support preparedness and response, and to inform risk mitigation, and be enhanced through data science and sociobehavioral and other research. CONCLUSIONS: The first version of this framework proposes five action areas in which WHO Member States and actors within society can apply, according to their mandate, an infodemic management approach adapted to national contexts and practices. Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and the related infodemic require swift, regular, systematic, and coordinated action from multiple sectors of society and government. It remains crucial that we promote trusted information and fight misinformation, thereby helping save lives.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Crowdsourcing , Health Education/methods , Health Education/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Media/organization & administration , Social Media/standards , World Health Organization , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Education/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Public Health/methods , Public Health/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/supply & distribution
7.
Health Info Libr J ; 37(3): 233-239, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597768

ABSTRACT

The virus, commonly known as COVID-19 which emerged in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, has spread in 213 countries, areas or territories around the globe, with nearly 144 683 deaths worldwide on 18 April 2020. In the wake of this pandemic, we have witnessed a massive infodemic with the public being bombarded with vast quantities of information, much of which is not scientifically correct. Fighting fake news is now the new front in the COVID-19 battle. This regular feature comments on the role of health sciences librarians and information professionals in combating the COVID-19 infodemic. To support their work, it draws attention to the myth busters, fact-checkers and credible sources relating to COVID-19. It also documents the guides that libraries have put together to help the general public, students and faculty recognise fake news.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Media/organization & administration , Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Databases, Factual , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Med Teach ; 42(7): 772-775, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245670

ABSTRACT

Health Professions' Educators (HPEs) and their learners have to adapt their educational provision to rapidly changing and uncertain circumstances linked to the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper reports on an AMEE-hosted webinar: Adapting to the impact of COVID-19: Sharing stories, sharing practice. Attended by over 500 colleagues from five continents, this webinar focused on the impact of the virus across the continuum of education and training. Short formal presentations on teaching and learning, assessment, selection and postgraduate training generated wide-ranging questions via the Chatbox. A thematic analysis of the Chatbox thread indicated the most pressing concerns and challenges educators were experiencing in having to adapt programmes and learning across the continuum of medical education and training. The main areas of concern were: campus-based teaching and learning; clinical teaching; selection and assessment, and educator needs. While there is clearly no one simple solution to the unprecedented issues medical education and training face currently, there were two over-arching messages. First, this is a time for colleagues across the globe to help and support each other. Second, many local responses and innovations could have the potential to change the shape of medical education and training in the future.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Organizational Innovation , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Education, Medical/standards , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology
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