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1.
Sensors (Basel) ; 21(22)2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524125

ABSTRACT

The current population worldwide extensively uses social media to share thoughts, societal issues, and personal concerns. Social media can be viewed as an intelligent platform that can be augmented with a capability to analyze and predict various issues such as business needs, environmental needs, election trends (polls), governmental needs, etc. This has motivated us to initiate a comprehensive search of the COVID-19 pandemic-related views and opinions amongst the population on Twitter. The basic training data have been collected from Twitter posts. On this basis, we have developed research involving ensemble deep learning techniques to reach a better prediction of the future evolutions of views in Twitter when compared to previous works that do the same. First, feature extraction is performed through an N-gram stacked autoencoder supervised learning algorithm. The extracted features are then involved in a classification and prediction involving an ensemble fusion scheme of selected machine learning techniques such as decision tree (DT), support vector machine (SVM), random forest (RF), and K-nearest neighbour (KNN). all individual results are combined/fused for a better prediction by using both mean and mode techniques. Our proposed scheme of an N-gram stacked encoder integrated in an ensemble machine learning scheme outperforms all the other existing competing techniques such unigram autoencoder, bigram autoencoder, etc. Our experimental results have been obtained from a comprehensive evaluation involving a dataset extracted from open-source data available from Twitter that were filtered by using the keywords "covid", "covid19", "coronavirus", "covid-19", "sarscov2", and "covid_19".


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Machine Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512312

ABSTRACT

Citizens are increasingly turning to social media to open up debates on issues of utmost importance, such as health or education. When analyzing citizens' social media interactions on COVID-19, research has underlined the importance of sharing and spreading information based on scientific evidence rather than on fake news. However, whether and how citizens' interactions in the field of education, particularly in mathematics, are based on scientific evidence remains underexplored. To contribute to filling this gap, this article presents an analysis of citizen debates in social networks about didactic resources for mathematics. Through social media analytics, 136,964 posts were extracted from Reddit, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, of which 1755 were analyzed. Results show that out of the 213 posts of citizen debates on didactic resources for mathematics, only two contained scientific evidence and eight claimed to contain scientific evidence. These findings highlight the importance of promoting actions to encourage citizen debates around didactic resources for mathematics based on scientific evidence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , Mathematics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22055, 2021 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510617

ABSTRACT

THE AIMS: (i) analyze connectivity between subgroups of university students, (ii) assess which bridges of relational contacts are essential for connecting or disconnecting subgroups and (iii) to explore the similarities between the attributes of the subgroup nodes in relation to the pandemic context. During the COVID-19 pandemic, young university students have experienced significant changes in their relationships, especially in the halls of residence. Previous research has shown the importance of relationship structure in contagion processes. However, there is a lack of studies in the university setting, where students live closely together. The case study methodology was applied to carry out a descriptive study. The participation consisted of 43 university students living in the same hall of residence. Social network analysis has been applied for data analysis. Factions and Girvan-Newman algorithms have been applied to detect the existing cohesive subgroups. The UCINET tool was used for the calculation of the SNA measure. A visualization of the global network will be carried out using Gephi software. After applying the Girvan-Newman and Factions, in both cases it was found that the best division into subgroups was the one that divided the network into 4 subgroups. There is high degree of cohesion within the subgroups and a low cohesion between them. The relationship between subgroup membership and gender was significant. The degree of COVID-19 infection is related to the degree of clustering between the students. College students form subgroups in their residence. Social network analysis facilitates an understanding of structural behavior during the pandemic. The study provides evidence on the importance of gender, race and the building where they live in creating network structures that favor, or not, contagion during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Network Analysis , Social Networking , Female , Housing , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Students , Universities
4.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(10): 2925, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491496
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480741

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, adolescents could not leave their house freely, meet up with friends, or attend school; previous literature showed that youths under enforced confinement or quarantine were five times more likely to suffer from psychopathological symptoms and use social networks sites (SNs) greatly. This study aimed to verify whether the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship could predict youths' psychopathological symptoms and their SN use during the pandemic, and to evaluate the possible moderator role of their the capacity to be alone. Seven hundred and thirty-nine (n = 739) adolescents were recruited from the general population during the COVID-19 lockdown in Italy, and they were administered The Capacity to be Alone Scale, The BSMAS, the YSR, and the Perceived Filial Self-efficacy Scale. Our results confirmed a direct effect of the perceived filial self-efficacy on the psychopathological symptoms so that a poorer perceived quality of the relationship with the caregivers predicted higher psychopathological symptoms in youths. Moreover, greater social networks use was predictive of psychopathological symptoms in adolescents. Our results also showed a significant interaction effect between adolescents' perceived filial efficacy and the capacity to be alone on SN use and on psychopathological symptoms. These results suggest that youths' response to the confinement during the pandemic is influenced both by individual characteristics (the capacity to be alone) and by relational variables (the perceived filial self-efficacy).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Adolescent , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19655, 2021 10 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450294

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 represents the most severe global crisis to date whose public conversation can be studied in real time. To do so, we use a data set of over 350 million tweets and retweets posted by over 26 million English speaking Twitter users from January 13 to June 7, 2020. We characterize the retweet network to identify spontaneous clustering of users and the evolution of their interaction over time in relation to the pandemic's emergence. We identify several stable clusters (super-communities), and are able to link them to international groups mainly involved in science and health topics, national elites, and political actors. The science- and health-related super-community received disproportionate attention early on during the pandemic, and was leading the discussion at the time. However, as the pandemic unfolded, the attention shifted towards both national elites and political actors, paralleled by the introduction of country-specific containment measures and the growing politicization of the debate. Scientific super-community remained present in the discussion, but experienced less reach and became more isolated within the network. Overall, the emerging network communities are characterized by an increased self-amplification and polarization. This makes it generally harder for information from international health organizations or scientific authorities to directly reach a broad audience through Twitter for prolonged time. These results may have implications for information dissemination along the unfolding of long-term events like epidemic diseases on a world-wide scale.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Isolation , Social Media , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Politics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Network Analysis , Social Networking
7.
J Healthc Eng ; 2021: 2122095, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438134

ABSTRACT

This study aims to explore phenomena and laws that occur when different users on social network platforms obtain health information by constructing an opinion mining model, analyzing the user's position on selected cases, and exploring the reflection of the phenomenon of truth decay on platforms. It selects group posts regarding the COVID-19 vaccination dispute on the Douban platform, analyzes the positions of different users, and explores phenomena related to users obtaining health information on domestic social platforms according to different topics and information behaviors. The results reveal a linear relationship between the negative and neutral attitudes of netizens on social networking platforms. Moreover, netizens tend to hold subjective language when expressing their views and attitudes, and their views on social platforms will not change easily. The study explores the health information acquisition behavior of netizens on social platforms based on the constructed user opinion mining model. The study is helpful for relevant units and platforms to make scientific decisions and provide guidance according to different positions of Internet users.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information , Social Media , Social Networking , Attitude , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403602

ABSTRACT

The impact of COVID-19 morbidity and mortality among family and friends on vaccination preferences is not well explored. A valid and reliable questionnaire was deployed online via mTurk to recruit a national random sample of adult Americans to understand COVID-19 vaccination preferences and its relationship with COVID-19 infection in social networks. A total of 1602 individuals participated in the study where the majority had taken at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine (79%) and almost a tenth were planning to do so (10%) or did not want to take the vaccine (11%). Compared to those who knew family members or friends affected by COVID-19, those who did not know anyone infected with (AOR = 3.20), hospitalized for (AOR = 3.60), or died of COVID-19 (AOR = 2.97) had statistically significantly higher odds of refusing the vaccines. Most strategies for reducing COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy focus on highlighting the benefits of COVID-19 vaccines. We suggest that the dangers of not getting the vaccine should also be emphasized as many people who do not know someone who was affected with COVID-19 are also hesitant towards vaccination. These individuals may not fully appreciate the morbidity and mortality impact of COVID-19 infections and the messaging can be tailored to highlight the risk of not having vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Morbidity , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking , Vaccination
9.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 257-263, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392950

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To analyze the content of publications within the medical NLP domain in 2020. METHODS: Automatic and manual preselection of publications to be reviewed, and selection of the best NLP papers of the year. Analysis of the important issues. RESULTS: Three best papers have been selected in 2020. We also propose an analysis of the content of the NLP publications in 2020, all topics included. CONCLUSION: The two main issues addressed in 2020 are related to the investigation of COVID-related questions and to the further adaptation and use of transformer models. Besides, the trends from the past years continue, such as diversification of languages processed and use of information from social networks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Natural Language Processing , Social Networking , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Medical Records , Mental Disorders
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378319

ABSTRACT

Online social networks have become an everyday aspect of many people's lives. Users spend more and more time on these platforms and, through their interactions on social media platforms, they create active and passive digital footprints. These data have a strong potential in many research areas; indeed, understanding people's communication on social media is essential for understanding their attitudes, experiences, behaviors and values. Researchers have found that the use of social networking sites impacts eating behavior; thus, analyzing social network data is important for understanding the meaning behind expressions used in the context of healthy food. This study performed a communication analysis of data from the social network Twitter, which included 666,178 messages posted by 168,134 individual users. These data comprised all tweets that used the #healthyfood hashtag between 2019 and 2020 on Twitter. The results revealed that users most commonly associate healthy food with a healthy lifestyle, diet, and fitness. Foods associated with this hashtag were vegan, homemade, and organic. Given that people change their behavior according to other people's behavior on social networks, these data could be used to identify current and future associations with current and future perceptions of healthy food characteristics.


Subject(s)
Social Media , Communication , Food, Organic , Humans , Social Networking , Vegans
11.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256036, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372006

ABSTRACT

Notable cross-country differences exist in the diffusion of the Covid-19 and in its lethality. Contact patterns in populations, and in particular intergenerational contacts, have been argued to be responsible for the most vulnerable, the elderly, getting infected more often and thus driving up mortality in some context, like in the southern European one. This paper asks a simple question: is it between whom contacts occur that matters or is it simply how many contacts people have? Due to the high number of confounding factors, it is extremely difficult to empirically assess the impact of single network features separately. This is why we rely on a simulation exercise in which we counterfactually manipulate single aspects of countries' age distribution and network structures. We disentangle the contributions of the kind and of the number of contacts while holding constant the age structure. More precisely, we isolate the respective effects of inter-age contact patterns, degree distribution and clustering on the virus propagation across age groups. We use survey data on face-to-face contacts for Great Britain, Italy, and Germany, to reconstruct networks that mirror empirical contact patterns in these three countries. It turns out that the number of social contacts (degree distribution) largely accounts for the higher infection rates of the elderly in the Italian context, while differences in inter-age contacts patterns are only responsible for minor differences. This suggests that policies specifically targeting inter-age contacts would be little effective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Social Networking , Age Distribution , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cluster Analysis , Contact Tracing/methods , Germany , Humans , Italy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
12.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1276-1281, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371750

ABSTRACT

The clinical learning environment (CLE) encompasses the learner's personal characteristics and experiences, social relationships, organizational culture, and the institution's physical and virtual infrastructure. During the COVID-19 pandemic, all 4 of these parts of the CLE have undergone a massive and rapid disruption. Personal and social communications have been limited to virtual interactions or shifted to unfamiliar clinical spaces because of redeployment. Rapid changes to the organizational culture required prompt adaptations from learners and educators in their complex organizational systems yet caused increased confusion and anxiety among them. A traditional reliance on a physical infrastructure for classical educational practices in the CLE was challenged when all institutions had to undergo a major transition to a virtual learning environment. However, disruptions spurred exciting innovations in the CLE. An entire cohort of physicians and learners underwent swift adjustments in their personal and professional development and identity as they rose to meet the clinical and educational challenges they faced due to COVID-19. Social networks and collaborations were expanded beyond traditional institutional walls and previously held international boundaries within multiple specialties. Specific aspects of the organizational and educational culture, including epidemiology, public health, and medical ethics, were brought to the forefront in health professions education, while the physical learning environment underwent a rapid transition to a virtual learning space. As health professions education continues in the era of COVID-19 and into a new era, educators must take advantage of these dynamic systems to identify additional gaps and implement meaningful change. In this article, health professions educators and learners from multiple institutions and specialties discuss the gaps and weaknesses exposed, opportunities revealed, and strategies developed for optimizing the CLE in the post-COVID-19 world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical/methods , Learning , Physical Distancing , Students, Medical/psychology , Cooperative Behavior , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Interdisciplinary Placement , Organizational Culture , Social Environment , Social Networking , United States
13.
Sci Prog ; 104(3): 368504211029793, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369465

ABSTRACT

Strong lockdowns to control COVID-19 pandemic have been enforced globally and strongly restricted social activities with consequent negative effects on mental health. Japan has effectively implemented a unique voluntary policy to control COVID-19, but the mental health impact of the policy has not been examined on a large scale. In this study, we examined the effect of the first declaration on the mental health of affected residents. We used population-level questionnaire data of 17,400 people living under the state of emergency and 9208 who were not through a social-networking-service app and applied a difference-in-differences regression model to estimate the causal effect of the declaration of the state of emergency on psychological wellbeing, stratified by job category. No statistically significant effect of the declaration was observed among all job categories. This suggests that residents' psychological situation has gradually changed, possibly influenced by other factors such as the surrounding environment, rather than the declaration itself. Given that Japan has a unique policy to control COVID-19 instead of a strict lockdown, our results showed the Japanese-style policy may serve as a form of harm reduction strategy, to control the epidemic with minimal psychological harm, and enable a policy that balances disease control and mental health. Caution is necessary that this study used self-reported data from a limited time period before and after the first declaration in April 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Japan , Mobile Applications , Social Networking
14.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(10): 2925, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368539
15.
Acad Med ; 96(7): 947-950, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364847

ABSTRACT

While advances in science and technology continue to be at the forefront of the evolution of medical practice, the 21st century is also undergoing a unique and profound cultural shift that is changing the very nature of what it means to be a medical professional, namely humankind's transition to an information-based internet society. Medical care will increasingly depend on computer-generated probabilities guided and supported by a growing variety of individuals in health care-related professions, including statisticians, technologists, and information managers. Perhaps the biggest challenge to the profession will come from the erosion of professional autonomy, driven by smart machines, social networks, and internet search engines. As a result of these and other changes, physicians are facing a systematic loss of control, often without the direct input and leadership of the profession itself. In this commentary, the author urges the profession to adopt several strategies, including shifting its focus from reimbursement to the care patients value most, meaningfully addressing critical issues in health policy, becoming the definitive source for publicly available medical information, reimagining medical education, and overhauling the existing accreditation and licensing systems. Medical education must go beyond a focus on physicians whose professional identity revolves around being the exclusive source of medical knowledge. In the digitized 21st century, medical education should emphasize the centrality of the humanistic interface with patients such that the doctor-patient relationship is paramount in the complex medical world of machines and social media. Removing the roadblocks to successful professional reform is no small task, but the process can begin with a grassroots movement that empowers physicians and facilitates organizational and behavioral change. Failure to take action may well hasten the diminishment of patient care and the profession's trusted role in society.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/history , Medical Informatics/instrumentation , Medicine/instrumentation , Physician-Patient Relations/ethics , Physicians/organization & administration , Access to Information , Accreditation/methods , Accreditation/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/methods , Empowerment , Health Policy , History, 21st Century , Humans , Knowledge , Leadership , Medical Informatics/legislation & jurisprudence , Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Professional Autonomy , Social Networking
16.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256363, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362093

ABSTRACT

The most unexpected and toughest phenomenon that has occurred in recent times is the global COVID-19 pandemic. One of the first measures to prevent the spread of the disease was to close educational institutions. The students were forced to start a learning process through social networks and web platforms. In some countries, a return to face-to-face classes was established. However, weeks later, some of them had to return to virtual activities due to an upswing in the COVID-19 cases. In Mexico, classes have been held virtually, with face-to-face activities only re-established in two of the 32 states. In our state, Yucatan, scholarly activities are still virtual. In this work, the dispersion of COVID-19 at different academic establishments in Yucatan was simulated. Networks of Friendship, noncordial treatment, family ties and study groups were considered. Based on these networks, we evaluated the possibility of returning to school without inducing a rebound in the COVID-19 cases in the state. Agent-based simulations were used, with each student as an agent. Interaction rules were established based on international research regarding good practices in times of COVID-19. We used seven networks from different academic institutions, ranging from primary through college level. As a result, possible contagion curves were obtained for different scenarios, which leads to a discussion about the measures that would be relevant once a return to face-to-face classes is overseen. Simulations show that isolating students and reducing the number of students in the same classroom are good strategies and substantially reduce the possible contagiousness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Schools , Social Networking , Systems Analysis , Universities
17.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256179, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354769

ABSTRACT

Conspiracy theories in social networks are considered to have adverse effects on individuals' compliance with public health measures in the context of a pandemic situation. A deeper understanding of how conspiracy theories propagate through social networks is critical for the development of countermeasures. The present work focuses on a novel approach to characterize the propagation of conspiracy theories through social networks by applying epidemiological models to Twitter data. A Twitter dataset was searched for tweets containing hashtags indicating belief in the "5GCoronavirus" conspiracy theory, which states that the COVID-19 pandemic is a result of, or enhanced by, the enrollment of the 5G mobile network. Despite the absence of any scientific evidence, the "5GCoronavirus" conspiracy theory propagated rapidly through Twitter, beginning at the end of January, followed by a peak at the beginning of April, and ceasing/disappearing approximately at the end of June 2020. An epidemic SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed) model was fitted to this time series with acceptable model fit, indicating parallels between the propagation of conspiracy theories in social networks and infectious diseases. Extended SIR models were used to simulate the effects that two specific countermeasures, fact-checking and tweet-deletion, could have had on the propagation of the conspiracy theory. Our simulations indicate that fact-checking is an effective mechanism in an early stage of conspiracy theory diffusion, while tweet-deletion shows only moderate efficacy but is less time-sensitive. More generally, an early response is critical to gain control over the spread of conspiracy theories through social networks. We conclude that an early response combined with strong fact-checking and a moderate level of deletion of problematic posts is a promising strategy to fight conspiracy theories in social networks. Results are discussed with respect to their theoretical validity and generalizability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Public Health , Social Media , Social Networking , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Physis (Rio J.) ; 31(2): e310204, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1350198

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective was to analyze the information related to the new coronavirus pandemic in Brazil, conveyed by national and state authorities, through the lens of risk communication and community engagement. This is a qualitative and reflective study, anchored in rhetorical analysis. Two groups of speeches were analyzed. The first, nationwide, subdivided into the discourse by the Presidency of the Republic of Brazil and by the Ministry of Health. The second, of the states, represented by their normative actions related to the fight against the pandemic. Some recommendations in the management of the disease have unanimous understanding. Other actions, however, do not find the same support in the national and subnational discourse, reason why the following is adopted for a more detailed analysis in this article: the organization of risk communication and community engagement; the practice of social distancing; and the use of medications to treat the disease. Risk communication is based on the premise that every public health emergency faces communication challenges and may benefit from the lessons already learned. The fact that there are different discourses among the entities of the Federation implies disorganization of information, disagreements, and a greater degree of uncertainty in the population about the disease and how to prevent it.


Resumo Objetivou-se analisar as informações relacionadas à pandemia do novo coronavírus no Brasil, veiculadas pelas autoridades nacionais e estaduais, pelas lentes da comunicação de risco e engajamento comunitário. Trata-se de um estudo qualitativo, reflexivo, ancorado na análise retórica. Foram analisados dois grupos de discursos. O primeiro, de âmbito nacional, subdividido em discurso da Presidência da República do Brasil e do Ministério da Saúde. O segundo, dos estados, representados por seus atos normativos relacionados ao enfrentamento da pandemia. Algumas recomendações no manejo da doença têm compreensão unânime. Outras ações, no entanto, não encontram o mesmo amparo no discurso nacional e subnacional, por esse motivo sendo tomado para análise mais detalhada nesse artigo, a saber: a organização da comunicação de risco e o engajamento comunitário; a prática de distanciamento social; e o uso de medicamentos para o tratamento da doença. A comunicação de risco parte da premissa de que toda emergência de saúde pública enfrenta desafios de comunicação e pode se beneficiar das lições aprendidas anteriormente. O fato da existência de discursos distintos entre os entes da federação implica na desorganização das informações, desentendimentos e maior grau de incerteza da população sobre a doença e como se prevenir.


Subject(s)
Humans , Politics , Public Health , Policy , Health Communication , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Brazil , Access to Information , Information Dissemination/methods , Social Networking
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 08 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348635

ABSTRACT

In a transnational context defined by the irruption of COVID-19 and the social isolation it has generated around the world, social networking sites are essential channels for communicating and developing new forms of social coexistence based on connectivity and interaction. This study analyzes the feelings expressed on Twitter through the hashtags #YoMeQuedoEnCasa, #stayhome, #jeresteàlamaison, #restealamaison, #stoacasa, #restaacasa, #ficaemcasa, #euficoemcasa, #ichbleibezuHause and #Bleibzuhause, and the communicative and social processes articulated from network participation, during the lockdown in 2020. Through Gephi software, the aspects underlying the communicative interaction and the distribution of the network at a global level are studied, with the identification of leaderships, communities and connectivity nodes. As a result of this interaction, the emergence of social and organizational links derived from community participation and motivated by the common interest of preserving health and general wellbeing through collective action is detected. The study notes the presence of feelings of solidarity, a sense of community and social support among connected crowds who, despite being in geographically dispersed settings, share similar concerns about the virus effect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Social Participation , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Social Networking
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