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1.
Epidemiol Infect ; 150: e32, 2022 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683881

ABSTRACT

Gatherings where people are eating and drinking can increase the risk of getting and spreading SARS-CoV-2 among people who are not fully vaccinated; prevention strategies like wearing masks and physical distancing continue to be important for some groups. We conducted an online survey to characterise fall/winter 2020-2021 holiday gatherings, decisions to attend and prevention strategies employed during and before gatherings. We determined associations between practicing prevention strategies, demographics and COVID-19 experience. Among 502 respondents, one-third attended in person holiday gatherings; 73% wore masks and 84% practiced physical distancing, but less did so always (29% and 23%, respectively). Younger adults were 44% more likely to attend gatherings than adults ≥35 years. Younger adults (adjusted prevalence ratio (aPR) 1.53, 95% CI 1.19-1.97), persons who did not experience COVID-19 themselves or have relatives/close friends experience severe COVID-19 (aPR 1.56, 95% CI 1.18-2.07), and non-Hispanic White persons (aPR 1.57, 95% CI 1.13-2.18) were more likely to not always wear masks in public during the 2 weeks before gatherings. Public health messaging emphasizing consistent application of COVID-19 prevention strategies is important to slow the spread of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Social Participation , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Family , Female , Holidays/psychology , Humans , Male , Meals , Middle Aged , Social Participation/psychology , United States , Young Adult
4.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(9): 953-957, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177693

ABSTRACT

This study explored older adults' technology use patterns and attitudes toward virtual volunteering during the COVID-19 pandemic. A 22-item survey was administered to 229 volunteers in the St. Louis region who tutor children through the Oasis Intergenerational Tutoring program. Although most respondents are familiar with technology and expressed that they are likely to volunteer virtually, their responses varied significantly by age, education, gender, income, and school districts. Some tutors expressed that virtual volunteering may eliminate barriers to in-person volunteering, while others were concerned with establishing a personal connection with students online. These findings suggest that tutors anticipate both benefits and challenges with virtual volunteering and that efforts to engage older adults during the pandemic should factor in prior use of technology and ensure that different subgroups are not marginalized.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19 , Computer Literacy , Education, Distance/methods , Educational Technology/methods , Social Participation/psychology , Teaching , Volunteers/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Intergenerational Relations , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Missouri , Teaching/psychology , Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/instrumentation
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102524

ABSTRACT

The majority of research on the fear of missing out (FOMO) has focused on understanding how social media posts about attractive unattended experiences taking place in the physical world (e.g., a friend's vacation) influence individuals' affective states. With quarantine measures in place, and in the absence of travel and party photos on social media, do individuals feel they are missing out on enjoyable experiences? The current work shows that FOMO has not disappeared during the pandemic, even when socially distancing at home, but has been replaced by feelings towards new online activities (e.g., online concerts, virtual gatherings). As a consequence, we find that FOMO threatens well-being by causing important psychological and health issues, such as sleep deprivation, loss of focus, declined productivity, and finding relief in knowing that others have difficulty keeping up with abundant digital content. Importantly, we find these consequential effects both during the initial (May 2020) and late stages (December 2020) of the pandemic. With excessive Internet use and virtual FOMO likely to be a continuing reality of life, questions remain as to how one can refrain from its negative effects and stay healthy during the pandemic and in the post-pandemic era. We discuss remedies and suggest new research avenues that may help elevate the negative consequences of FOMO on well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Social Participation/psychology , Students/psychology , Universities , Fear , Humans
7.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) ; 30(2): e13385, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963041

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perception of self-isolation at home in patients with cancer during the lockdown period resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy. METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted through an online survey of patients with cancer who were sheltering at home from 29th March to 3rd May 2020. Perception of self-isolation was assessed using the ISOLA scale, after evaluation of its psychometric properties. Content analysis was used to analyse two open-ended questions. RESULTS: The participants were 195 adult patients with cancer (female = 76%; mean age = 50.3 ± 11.2; haematological malignancy = 51.3%). They reported moderate isolation-related suffering (M = 2.64 ± 0.81), problems in their relationships with others (M = 3.31 ± 1.13) and difficulties in their relationships with themselves (M = 3.14 ± 1.06). Patients who experienced significantly more social problems were older, had less education and were living without minor children. Overall, four main categories emerged from the qualitative content analysis: (1) lack of freedom and social life, (2) uncertainty and worries, (3) feeling supported and (4) dealing with isolation. CONCLUSION: Living with cancer in the COVID-19 pandemic was often perceived as an isolating experience, primarily in terms of detachment from loved ones.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Educational Status , Family Characteristics , Neoplasms/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Social Support , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Residence Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Participation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uncertainty
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895368

ABSTRACT

Older adults are less familiar with communication technology, which became essential to maintain social contacts during the COVID-19 lockdown. The present study aimed at exploring how older adults, previously trained for Social Networking Sites (SNSs) use, experienced the lockdown period. In the first two weeks of May 2020, telephone surveys were conducted with individuals aged 81-85 years and resident in Abbiategrasso (Milan), who previously participated in a study aimed at evaluating the impact of SNSs use on loneliness in old age (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04242628). We collected information on SNSs use, self-perceived loneliness, and social engagement with family and friends. Interviewed participants were stratified as trained (N = 60) and untrained (N = 70) for SNSs use, based on their attendance to group courses held the previous year as part of the main experimental study. The groups were comparable for sociodemographics and clinical features. Participants trained for SNSs use reported significantly higher usage of SNSs and reduced feeling of being left out. Compared to pre-lockdown levels, individuals trained for SNSs use showed a lighter reduction in social contacts. These findings support the utility of training older adults for SNSs use in order to improve their social inclusion, even in extreme conditions of self-isolation and perceived vulnerability.


Subject(s)
Aging/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Loneliness/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quality of Life , Social Networking , Social Participation/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci ; 76(3): e99-e103, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-648782

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has excluded older adults from a society based on physical social contact. Vulnerable populations like older adults also tend to be excluded from digital services because they opt not to use the internet, lack necessary devices and network connectivity, or inexperience using the technology. Older adults who are frail and are not online, many of whom are in long-term care facilities, struggle with the double burden of social and digital exclusion. This paper discusses the potential outcomes of this exclusion and provides recommendations for rectifying the situation, with a particular focus on older adults in long-term care facilities.


Subject(s)
Aging , COVID-19 , Internet Access , Social Isolation , Social Networking , Social Participation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/psychology , Female , Homes for the Aged , Humans , Internet Access/statistics & numerical data , Male , Nursing Homes , Social Participation/psychology
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