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1.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(3): e19831, 2020 07 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-651795

ABSTRACT

Before the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), 1 in 3 women and girls, globally, were victimized by an abusive partner in intimate relationships. However, the current pandemic has amplified cases of domestic violence (DV) against women and girls, with up to thrice the prevalence in DV cases compared to the same time last year. Evidence of the adverse effects of the pandemic on DV is still emerging, even as violence prevention strategies are iteratively being refined by service providers, advocacy agencies, and survivors to meet stay-at-home mandates. Emotional and material support for survivors is a critical resource increasingly delivered using digital and technology-based modalities, which offer several advantages and challenges. This paper rapidly describes current DV mitigation approaches using digital solutions, signaling emerging best practices to support survivors, their children, and abusers during stay-at-home advisories. Some examples of technology-based strategies and solutions are presented. An immediate priority is mapping out current digital solutions in response to COVID-19-related DV and outlining issues with uptake, coverage, and meaningful use of digital solutions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Domestic Violence/prevention & control , Intimate Partner Violence/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Domestic Violence/statistics & numerical data , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Prevalence , Social Support , Survivors/psychology
3.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 649-656, 2020 Jun 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand medical students' mental health, professional pride, and intention to work in the front-line during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and provide a reference for psychological intervention. METHODS: We used the depression-anxiety-stress scale and self-designed questionnaire on professional pride, intention to work in the front-line and the extent of family support. Medical students from 4 medical schools in Fujian and Hunan were investigated. Their mental health status, professional pride and first-line work willingness with different characteristics were compared, and the influential factors for professional pride and first-line work willingness were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 266 valid questionnaires were collected. During the pandemic, there were significant differences in the proportion of depressed students among different college and universities, majors and stages (P<0.05), and the professional pride was significantly different (P<0.001). Medical students with different mental health status showed significant differences in professional pride (P<0.01). Marriage, pressure and extent of family support were the influential factors for their professional pride (P<0.05). The latter two were also influential factors for their intention to work in the front-line (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, students from college and nursing have relatively better mental health and higher professional pride. The professional pride is low in medical students who married, with abnormal stress or low family support. The intention to work in front-line is decreased in students with abnormal stress or low family support.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Betacoronavirus , China , Family , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Professionalism , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
BMC Psychiatry ; 20(1): 426, 2020 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733045

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychological status of the general population in mainland China during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and to explore the factors influencing psychological distress, in order to provide the basis for further psychological intervention programs. METHODS: We administered three questionnaires on-line to a convenience sample of the general population from different regions of mainland China from February 1 to February 4, 2020. We used the Mandarin versions of the six-item Kessler psychological distress scale (K6), the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ), and the Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS). We also collected demographic data and other information related to the COVID-19 outbreak. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing psychological distress. RESULTS: Of 1607 respondents, 1588 returned valid questionnaires and were included in the analysis. Nearly one quarter (22.8%) had high levels of psychological distress (K6 score ≥ 13). Individuals with higher psychological distress were more likely to be unmarried, spend more than 6 h per day searching for information about COVID-19, more frequently adopt a passive coping style, and report less social support than those with lower psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 outbreak in China has a great impact on the mental health status of the general population. Active coping strategies and increased social support are significantly correlated with decreased psychological distress, and may serve as the basis for psychological interventions.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychological Distress , Social Support , Adult , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Public Health/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Sex Health ; 17(4): 384-386, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729023

ABSTRACT

Sex workers confront unique challenges in the face of COVID-19. Data from an international sex work website popular with cisgender men and transgender men and women suggest that, after a period of physical distancing, many sex workers are returning to in-person work: from May to August 2020, active sex work profiles increased 9.4% (P < 0.001) and newly created profiles increased by 35.6% (P < 0.001). Analysis of sex work and COVID-19 guidelines published by five community-based organisations found that they focused on altering sexual practices, enhancing hygiene and pivoting to virtual work. To capitalise on these guidelines, funding and research for implementation and evaluation are needed to support COVID-19 risk reduction strategies for sex workers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Promotion/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Sex Work/statistics & numerical data , Sex Workers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Female , Humans , Male , Safe Sex , Social Support , Transgender Persons/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
7.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 9(1): 113, 2020 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical care workers experienced unprecedented levels of workload and pressure since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Little is known about its exact impact on medical care workers and related factors in China. This study aims to identify the psychological impact of COVID-19 on medical care workers in China. METHODS: From February 23 to March 5, 2020, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 863 medical care workers from seven provinces in China using standard questionnaires measuring adverse psychological outcomes including Impact of Event Scale-6 (IES-6), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale(DASS)and related psychosocial factors like perceived threat, social support and coping strategies. Exploratory Factor analysis was performed to identify the dimensions of perceived threat by study participants. Multivariate regression was used to examine the determinants of adverse psychological outcomes. RESULTS: Posttraumatic stress (PTS) were prevalent in this sample of health care professionals, and 40.2% indicated positive screens for significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. The proportion of having mild to extremely severe symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress were 13.6, 13.9 and 8.6%, respectively. Perceived threat and passive coping strategies were positively correlated to PTS and DASS scores, while perceived social support and active coping strategies were negatively correlated to DASS scores. Nurses were more likely to be anxious than others among medical care workers during the COVID-19 epidemic. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse psychological symptoms were prevalent among medical care workers in China during the COVID-19 epidemic. Screening for adverse psychological outcomes and developing corresponding preventive measures would be beneficial in decreasing negative psychological outcomes.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/prevention & control , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Psychological Tests , Psychometrics , Social Support , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
9.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 263, 2020 07 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691246

ABSTRACT

The current study aimed to explore mental health problems in patients diagnosed with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. A cluster sampling, cross-sectional survey with 6213 cancer patients was conducted in one of the largest cancer centers in China. The socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, psychosomatic conditions, interpersonal relationships and social support, COVID-19 infection-related psychological stress, and mental health status were measured. Medical conditions were extracted from patients' electronic healthcare records. Among the 6213 cancer patients, 23.4% had depression, 17.7% had anxiety, 9.3% had PTSD, and 13.5% had hostility. Hierarchical liner regression models showed that having a history of mental disorder, excessive alcohol consumption, having a higher frequency of worrying about cancer management due to COVID-19, having a higher frequency feeling of overwhelming psychological pressure from COVID-19, and having a higher level of fatigue and pain were the predominant risk factors for mental health problems in cancer patients. However, there were only 1.6% of them were seeking psychological counseling during COVID-19. We also revealed the protective factors associated with lower risk of mental health problems among cancer patients. The present study revealed a high prevalence of mental health problems and gaps in mental health services for cancer patients, which also indicated high distress from COVID-19-elevated risks. We call for systematic screening of mental health status for all cancer patients, and developing specific psychological interventions for this vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cluster Analysis , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
12.
J Aging Soc Policy ; 32(4-5): 425-431, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-658576

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 fatalities exemplify "bad deaths" and are distinguished by physical discomfort, difficulty breathing, social isolation, psychological distress, and care that may be discordant with the patient's preferences. Each of these death attributes is a well-documented correlate of bereaved survivors' symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger. Yet the grief experienced by survivors of COVID-related deaths is compounded by the erosion of coping resources like social support, contemporaneous stressors including social isolation, financial precarity, uncertainty about the future, lack of routine, and the loss of face-to-face mourning rituals that provide a sense of community and uplift. National efforts to enhance advance care planning may help dying patients to receive care that is concordant with the preferences of them and their families. Virtual funeral services, pairing bereaved elders with a telephone companion, remote counseling, and encouraging "continuing bonds" may help older adults adapt to loss in the time of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Ceremonial Behavior , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Social Support
13.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 11: 2150132720943328, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-657632

ABSTRACT

In times of the coronavirus pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 psychological support needs to meet certain requirements. Due to the lockdown in many countries of the world, the every-day activities of millions of people are reduced to a minimum. This may cause increased psychosomatic symptoms in persons with pre-existing mental illnesses, and additionally raises new challenges for the general population. As a result of the current contact restrictions, access to psychotherapy is further complicated. To guarantee the best possible care under the given conditions, we developed the CoPE (Coping with Corona: Extended Psychosomatic care in Essen) concept. CoPE is delivered by telephone or video calls as well as online contents. The materials presented at our webpage www.cope-corona.de aim to easily reach citizens affected by symptoms such as worries, depression or anger and let them receive readily understandable expert knowledge and training in basic self-help methods.


Subject(s)
Community Mental Health Services/methods , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Social Support , Adaptation, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Self-Management , Telemedicine
14.
Am Surg ; 86(6): 567-571, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-656872

ABSTRACT

A surgeon was among the teams caring for critically-ill patients with COVID-19 infection during the height of the pandemic in March and April 2020 in Brooklyn. He recorded his experiences and thoughts as events unfolded, a chronicle of the landmark public health event of the century. Working to exhaustion alongside his colleagues from Mount Sinai Hospital, he encountered tragedy and inspiration.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Physician's Role/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Surgeons/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Physician-Patient Relations , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Support
15.
Subst Use Misuse ; 55(11): 1902-1904, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646895

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older people with human immunodeficiency virus - HIV (OPWH) defined as ≥50 years old account for a growing proportion of newly diagnosed infections in Ukraine (16% in 2018), but the prevalence of substance use disorder among OPWH in Ukraine remains unknown. Ukraine responded to the Covid-19 pandemic with a comprehensive lockdown in late March 2020. Objectives: We conducted a phone survey among 123 OPWH with substance use disorders (SUD) in Kyiv in May 2020 to learn if these older adults may continue HIV and SUD therapy while coping with the Covid-19 pandemic. Results: Data from the survey demonstrated that while OPWH with SUD maintained HIV and SUD therapy throughout Covid-19 lockdown, social support is critical to avoiding treatment interruption for OPWH with SUD. Conclusions/Importance: During reopening, reduction of support may lead to OPWH feeling even more isolated. Post-Covid-19 pharmacological approaches to SUD treatment without social support are like vehicles without gas. The research agenda for OPWH patients with SUD going forward must include determining the type of telehealth support that will be optimally effective to retain OPWH including people who inject drugs (PWID), provision of support by lay health workers, and cost-effectiveness of such interventions. The lessons learned may be relevant to other countries as well.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , HIV Infections/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Retention in Care , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Comorbidity , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/psychology , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Social Isolation , Social Support , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Ukraine/epidemiology
16.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 140(7)2020 05 05.
Article in Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-643565
17.
J Investig Med ; 68(6): 1128-1134, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639865

ABSTRACT

Mentorship is a critical component of career development, particularly in academic medicine. Peer mentorship, which does not adhere to traditional hierarchies, is perhaps more accessible for underrepresented groups, including women and minorities. In this article, we review various models of peer mentorship, highlighting their respective advantages and disadvantages. Structured peer mentorship groups exist in different settings, such as those created under the auspices of formal career development programs, part of training grant programs, or through professional societies. Social media has further enabled the establishment of informal peer mentorship through participatory online groups, blogs, and forums that provide platforms for peer-to-peer advice and support. Such groups can evolve rapidly to address changing conditions, as demonstrated by physician listserv and Facebook groups related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Peer mentorship can also be found among colleagues brought together through a common location, interest, or goal, and typically these relationships are informal and fluid. Finally, we highlight here our experience with intentional formation of a small peer mentoring group that provides structure and a safe space for professional and social-emotional growth and support. In order to maximize impact and functionality, this model of peer mentorship requires commitment among peers and a more formalized process than many other peer mentoring models, accounting for group dynamics and the unique needs of members. When done successfully, the depth of these mentoring relationships can produce myriad benefits for individuals with careers in academic medicine including, but not limited to, those from underrepresented backgrounds.


Subject(s)
Inservice Training , Interprofessional Relations , Mentoring , Mentors , Career Choice , Coronavirus Infections , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups , Occupational Exposure , Pandemics , Peer Group , Physicians , Physicians, Women , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Media , Social Support , Societies, Medical , United States , Universities
18.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 12(1): e1-e3, 2020 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-635750

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has presented unprecedented health challenges across all strata in society throughout the world. The COVID experience has caused us to reflect on quality of life, health and well-being and, just as important, end of life. During this time, spiritual care forms a vital component of holistic health management, especially in terms of coping, coming to terms with illness, suffering and ultimately death. The relationship with the transcendent or sacred has a strong influence on a people's beliefs, attitudes, emotions and behaviour. Populations, communities, families and individuals have always found solace through their religious or philosophical beliefs during times of personal adversity and widespread anxiety or disaster. Although spiritual care has always been a part of the domain of religious beliefs, a more contemporary perspective is that spiritual care forms part of the human psyche and thus forms part of human care, health and well-being for families, patients and healthcare workers. Spiritual care deals with the provision of compassion and empathy during periods of heightened stress, distress and anxiety within care. This article provides insights into the necessity of providing spiritual care as a means of coping and well-being for families, patients and healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Religion and Medicine , Spirituality , Adaptation, Psychological , Attitude to Health , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Religion , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
20.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e923549, 2020 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), formerly known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan City, China. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a multivariate analysis method to determine the structural relationship between measured variables. This observational study aimed to use SEM to determine the effects of social support on sleep quality and function of medical staff who treated patients with COVID-19 in January and February 2020 in Wuhan, China. MATERIAL AND METHODS A one-month cross-sectional observational study included 180 medical staff who treated patients with COVID-19 infection. Levels of anxiety, self-efficacy, stress, sleep quality, and social support were measured using the and the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction (SASR) questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Social Support Rate Scale (SSRS), respectively. Pearson's correlation analysis and SEM identified the interactions between these factors. RESULTS Levels of social support for medical staff were significantly associated with self-efficacy and sleep quality and negatively associated with the degree of anxiety and stress. Levels of anxiety were significantly associated with the levels of stress, which negatively impacted self-efficacy and sleep quality. Anxiety, stress, and self-efficacy were mediating variables associated with social support and sleep quality. CONCLUSIONS SEM showed that medical staff in China who were treating patients with COVID-19 infection during January and February 2020 had levels of anxiety, stress, and self-efficacy that were dependent on sleep quality and social support.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Medical Staff , Pneumonia, Viral , Sleep , Social Support , Adult , Anxiety , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Self Efficacy , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
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