Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 65
Filter
1.
JAMA Intern Med ; 182(5): 469-470, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1843821
4.
JAMA Pediatr ; 176(1): 98-99, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664331
5.
JAMA Pediatr ; 176(1): 99, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664330
6.
J Palliat Med ; 25(2): 193-199, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662097

ABSTRACT

The issue of generalist versus specialist palliative care is on the minds of healthcare leaders everywhere. We are amid changing demographics of physicians. The industrialization of medicine is well underway in the US and around the developing world. Is it important to identify patients who benefit the most from specialist palliative care, given that it is currently a limited resource? Should we step out of standard practice and redesign palliative care using principles of population management? The COVID pandemic rapidly introduced virtual palliative care consults. Is it a better way to promote wide access to specialty palliative care? Looking forward, should we promote ways to advance primary palliative care and reserve specialty palliative care to patients who will benefit most from this level of care? These questions, and others, are considered in this transcribed discussion between leading physicians in the field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Medicine , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Palliative Care , Specialization
7.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 258, 2021 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635568

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Hungarian primary care system faces a severe shortage of family physicians. Medical students' perceptions of family medicine need to be known and medical students need to be given appropriate and comprehensible information about this speciality. The expected future salary is an important factor in career choice. Most of the family doctors are self-employed and the practices have a corrected capitation-type financing. Although the majority of health care services are covered by social health insurance and are provided for the insured patients free of charge, informal payment is an existing phenomenon with different motivations and consequences. This study aimed to investigate medical students' knowledge about their future earning opportunities and their attitudes towards informal payment. METHODS: A cross sectional survey with a self-administered questionnaire was conducted. Each of the four Hungarian medical universities were represented by their medical students who attended family medicine lectures in person from December 2019 to April 2020. The students were asked about their career plans, about their estimations of current and ideal expected salaries and about the effect of expected income for the choice of specialisation. Their attitudes towards informal payment were assessed. RESULTS: Response rate was 67.3% (N = 465/691). Almost two-thirds of the participants were women. Only 5% of the respondents (N = 23/462) plan to work as a family doctor in the future. The vast majority (91.9%) of the students had already thought about their future income. On a 10-point Likert scale (1 = 'no influence', 10 = 'very big influence') 76% answered that the expected future income exerts a considerable (≥5 Likert points) influence on their career choice in general. The mean of the ideal expected monthly income of the residents, GPs and other specialists was €1154 ± 648, €1696 ± 904 and €2174 ± 1594, respectively. The mean of the monthly income for a GP, as estimated by the studenst, was €1140 in rural and €1122 in urban settings. More than four-fifths of the students (N = 375/453) rejected the practice of informal payment. CONCLUSIONS: Expected salaray is one important aspect in the career choice of medical students, students wish to have more information on this topic. The reported ideal incomes are higher than those expected. This points to a relevant gap. However, most of the students do not accept informal payment as a possibility to close this gap. The expected and the ideal income differ from the real incomes of Hungarian GPs - this indicates the need of bringing objectoive information to the students to enhance attractivity of GP as a carer choice.


Subject(s)
Students, Medical , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Practice , Female , Humans , Specialization , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389361

ABSTRACT

This study aims to identify factors related with SARS-CoV-2 infection in physicians and internal residents during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic at a tertiary hospital in Spain, through a cross- sectional descriptive perception study with analytical components through two questionnaires directed at professionals working at the Ramon y Cajal University Hospital between February and April 2020. In total, 167 professionals formed the study group, and 156 professionals comprised the comparison group. Seventy percent of the professionals perceived a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), while 40% perceived a shortage of hand sanitiser, although more than 70% said they used it properly. Soap was more available and had a higher percentage of correct use (73.6-79.5%) (p > 0.05). Hand hygiene was optimal in >70% of professionals according to all five WHO measurements. In the adjusted model (OR; CI95%), belonging to a high-risk specialty (4.45; 1.66-11.91) and the use of public transportation (3.27; 1.87-5.73) remained risk factors. Protective factors were changes of uniform (0.53; 0.32-0.90), sanitation of personal objects before the workday (0.55; 0.31-0.97), and the disinfection of shared material (0.34; 0.19-0.58). We cannot confirm that a shortage or misuse of PPE is a factor in the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Fears and assessments are similar in both groups, but we cannot causally relate them to the spread of infection. The perception of the area of risk is different in both groups, suggesting that more information and education for healthcare workers is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Spain/epidemiology , Specialization
12.
Dent Med Probl ; 58(3): 285-290, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380141

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) has had drastic effects among healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess knowledge and awareness among dental specialists, general dentists and dental assistants regarding standard patient care guidelines for minimizing the spread of the infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A survey-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 84 participants. The participants were divided into groups of dental specialists, general dentists and dental assistants. A modified version of a validated questionnaire was used to evaluate knowledge and awareness regarding SARS­CoV­2 as per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. Data was analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's tests to assess differences in knowledge regarding the SARS­CoV­2 guidelines across the 3 groups. The simple linear regression analysis was used to examine factors influencing the knowledge scores. RESULTS: Among all dental specialists, 13 orthodontists, 9 operative dentists, 8 maxillofacial surgeons, 4 prosthodontists, and 1 periodontist responded to the survey. The mean knowledge scores of dental specialists, general dentists and dental assistants were 10.05 ±2.10, 9.95 ±2.30 and 8.53 ±2.10, respectively. Overall, we found a significant difference (p = 0.02) in the knowledge scores between the groups, and pairwise comparisons showed that there was a significant difference (p = 0.03) in the knowledge scores between dental specialists and dental assistants. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that hospitals should conduct mandatory workshops, training sessions and seminars to raise the awareness of the novel coronavirus pandemic and disinfection protocols, not only for specialists, but for all staff members.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Assistants , Dentists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Specialization , United States
13.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(11): 1693.e1-1693.e8, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347547

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To define the status of infectious diseases (ID) as an approved specialty in Europe; to enumerate the number of specialists (in general and in relation to the overall population) and specialist trainees and describe the content, delivery and evaluation of postgraduate training in ID in different countries. METHODS: Structured web-based questionnaire surveys in March 2021 of responsible national authorities, specialist societies and individual country representatives to the Section of Infectious Diseases of the European Union for Medical Specialties. Descriptive analysis of quantitative and qualitative responses. RESULTS: In responses received from 33/35 (94.3%) countries, ID is recognized as a specialty in 24 and as a subspecialty of general internal medicine (GIM) in eight, but it is not recognized in Spain. The number of ID specialists per country varies from <5 per million inhabitants to 78 per million inhabitants. Median length of training is 5 years (interquartile range 4.0-6.0 years) with variable amounts of preceding and/or concurrent GIM. Only 21.2% of countries (7/33) provide the minimum recommended training of 6 months in microbiology and 30% cover competencies such as palliative care, team working and leadership, audit, and quality control. Training is monitored by personal logbook or e-portfolio in 75.8% (25/33) and assessed by final examinations in 69.7% (23/33) of countries, but yearly reviews with trainees only occur in 54.5% (18/33) of countries. CONCLUSIONS: There are substantial gaps in modernization of ID training in many countries to match current European training requirements. Joint training with clinical microbiology (CM) and in multidisciplinary team working should be extended. Training/monitoring trainers should find greater focus, together with regular feedback to trainees within many national training programmes.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Education, Medical , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/therapy , Curriculum , Education, Medical/trends , Europe , Humans , Specialization , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Ann Diagn Pathol ; 54: 151805, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336215

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have shown that relatively few MD, DO, and underrepresented in medicine (URM) students and physicians are matching into pathology residency in the United States (US). In the 2021 Main Residency Match, just 33.6% of filled pathology residency positions were taken by senior year students at US allopathic medical schools. This has been attributed to the fact that pathology is not a required rotation in most US medical schools, pathology is often taught in an integrated curriculum in the US where is does not stand out as a distinct field, and because the COVID-19 pandemic led to a suspension of in-person pathology rotations and electives. Ultimately, many US medical students fail to consider pathology as a career pathway. The objective of this article is to provide medical students with basic information, in the form of frequently asked questions (FAQs), about pathology training and career opportunities. This was accomplished by forming a team of MD and DO pathology attendings, pathology trainees, and a medical student from multiple institutions to create a pathology guide for medical students. This guide includes information about post-sophomore fellowships, 5 major pathology residency tracks, more than 20 fellowship pathways, and allopathic and osteopathic board examinations. This guide also contains photographs and descriptions of major pathology sub-specialties, including the daily and on-call duties and responsibilities of pathology residents. The exciting future of pathology is also discussed. This guide supports the agenda of the College of American Pathologists' (CAP) Pathologist Pipeline Initiative to improve student recruitment into pathology.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Fellowships and Scholarships , Internship and Residency , Pathology/education , Students, Medical , Biomedical Research/economics , Biomedical Research/education , Humans , Pathology/economics , Pathology/methods , Periodicals as Topic , Research Support as Topic , Specialization , United States
15.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(10): e14666, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the perspectives of dermatology specialists and residents on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines. METHODS: Present questionnaire-based study was conducted on dermatology residents and specialists between January 5 and 20. A non-validated online questionary evaluating the attitude of the participants about the COVID-19 vaccine was performed. In the first step of the study, data related to the demographic features, all participants' clinical characteristics, and working conditions were recorded. Thereafter answers given to 12 specific questions were recorded. The study population was divided into two groups: dermatology residents (n = 138) and specialists (n = 159). Mentioned variables were compared between the two defined groups. Furthermore, a correlation analysis was performed to assess the relationship between vaccination acceptance and various study parameters. RESULTS: Majority of the cases had positive attitudes against COVID-19 vaccines. However, there were significant differences between the resident and specialist groups related to the source of information, working conditions, degree of concern, and type of vaccines. Statistically significant negative, weak correlations were observed for age and duration of medical practice (r = -.128, P = .028; r = -.132, P = .041 respectively). Statistically significant positive weak correlations were observed for chronic diseases, level of knowledge about COVID-19 vaccines, number of information sources about COVID-19, and previous COVID-19 infection (r = .133, P = .021; r = .207, P < .001; r = .335, P < .001; r = .176, P = .002 respectively). CONCLUSION: The acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination may be affected by working conditions, medical experience, level of knowledge and the presence of risk factors for severe disease among dermatology residents and specialists.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialization , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(11): 1595-1600, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284009

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has demonstrated the value of highly skilled and extensively trained specialists in clinical microbiology (CM) and infectious diseases (ID). Training curricula in CM and ID must constantly evolve to prepare trainees for future pandemics and to allow trainees to reach their full clinical and academic potential. OBJECTIVES: In this narrative review, we aim to outline necessary future adaptations in CM and ID training curricula and identify current structural barriers in training with the aim of discussing possibilities to address these shortcomings. SOURCES: We reviewed literature from PubMed and included selected books and online publications as appropriate. There was no time constraint on the included publications. CONTENT: Drawing from the lessons learnt during the pandemic, we summarize novel digital technologies relevant to CM and ID trainees and highlight interdisciplinary teamwork and networking skills as important competencies. We centre CM and ID training within the One Health framework and discuss gender inequalities and structural racism as barriers in both CM and ID training and patient care. IMPLICATIONS: CM and ID trainees should receive training and support developing skills in novel digital technologies, leadership, interdisciplinary teamwork and networking. Equally important is the need for equity of opportunity, with firm commitments to end gender inequality and structural racism in CM and ID. Policy-makers and CM and ID societies should ensure that trainees are better equipped to achieve their professional goals and are better prepared for the challenges awaiting in their fields.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Microbiology/education , Specialization , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Gender Equity , Humans , One Health , Pandemics , Racism
18.
Acta Derm Venereol ; 101(9): adv00540, 2021 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247772

ABSTRACT

Most teledermatology studies focus on patients' satisfaction; fewer focus on the experiences of healthcare professionals. This qualitative study explored healthcare professionals' perceptions of teledermatology used for linking public primary care clinics with the specialist dermatology centre in Singapore. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 family physicians and dermatologists. Six themes were identified: satisfaction with the service; perceived patient benefits; rationale for introducing teledermatology; educational impact; challenges of virtual consultations; and desirable service refinements for the future. Family physicians and dermatologists were positive about the service, but highlighted a need to streamline referral processes and improve the quality of transmitted images. Reduced need for referral to the specialist centre could be achieved by expanding the polyclinic's pharmacopoeia and treatment modalities. This study highlights the benefits of telemedicine for patient, professionals, and healthcare organizations, and these are reassuring given the widespread and rapid introduction of telemedicine through necessity during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Skin Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , Physicians, Family , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/therapy , Specialization
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL