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5.
J Surg Oncol ; 124(2): 193-199, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378940

ABSTRACT

Telesimulation (TS), the process of using the internet to link educators and trainees at locations remote from one another, harnesses the powers of technology to enable access to high-quality simulation-based education and assessment to learners across the globe. From its first uses in the teaching and assessment of laparoscopic skills to more recent interpretations during the current pandemic, TS has shown promise in helping educators to address pressing dilemmas in medical education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Simulation Training/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Educational Technology , Global Health , Humans , International Cooperation , Internet
6.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 77: 63-70, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The corona virus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has radically changed the possibilities for vascular surgeons and trainees to exchange knowledge and experience. The aim of the present survey is to inventorize the e-learning needs of vascular surgeons and trainees as well as the strengths and weaknesses of vascular e-Learning. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 18 questions was created in English, with a separate bilingual English-Mandarin version. The survey was dispersed to vascular surgeons and trainees worldwide through social media and via direct messaging from June 15, 2020 to October 15, 2020. RESULTS: Eight hundred and fifty-six records from 84 different countries could be included. Most participants attended several online activities (>4: n = 461, 54%; 2-4: n = 300, 35%; 1: n = 95, 11%) and evaluated online activities as positive or very positive (84.7%). In deciding upon participation, the topic of the activity was most important (n = 440, 51.4%), followed by the reputation of the presenter or the panel (n = 178, 20.8%), but not necessarily receiving accreditation or certification (n = 52, 6.1%). The survey identified several shortcomings in vascular e-Learning during the pandemic: limited possibility to attend due to lack of time and increased workload (n = 432, 50.5%), no protected/allocated time (n = 488, 57%) and no accreditation or certification, while technical shortcomings were only a minor problem (n = 25, 2.9%). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic vascular e-Learning has been used frequently and was appreciated by vascular professionals from around the globe. The survey identified strengths and weaknesses in current e-Learning that can be used to further improve online learning in vascular surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Learning , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Comorbidity , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Diseases/surgery
8.
Am J Surg ; 223(2): 395-403, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The time course and longitudinal impact of the COVID -19 pandemic on surgical education(SE) and learner well-being (LWB)is unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Check-in surveys were distributed to Surgery Program Directors and Department Chairs, including general surgery and surgical specialties, in the summer and winter of 2020 and compared to a survey from spring 2020. Statistical associations for items with self-reported ACGME Stage and the survey period were assessed using categorical analysis. RESULTS: Stage 3 institutions were reported in spring (30%), summer (4%) [p < 0.0001] and increased in the winter (18%). Severe disruption (SD) was stage dependent (Stage 3; 45% (83/184) vs. Stages 1 and 2; 26% (206/801)[p < 0.0001]). This lessened in the winter (23%) vs. spring (32%) p = 0.02. LWB severe disruption was similar in spring 27%, summer 22%, winter 25% and was associated with Stage 3. CONCLUSIONS: Steps taken during the pandemic reduced SD but did not improve LWB. Systemic efforts are needed to protect learners and combat isolation pervasive in a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Education, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Education, Medical/standards , Humans , Learning , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
10.
BJS Open ; 5(3)2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281850

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had a global impact on all aspects of healthcare including surgical training. This study aimed to quantify the impact of COVID-19 on operative case numbers recorded by surgeons in training, and annual review of competency progression (ARCP) outcomes in the UK. METHODS: Anonymized operative logbook numbers were collated from electronic logbook and ARCP outcome data from the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme database for trainees in the 10 surgical specialty training specialties.Operative logbook numbers and awarded ARCP outcomes were compared between predefined dates. Effect sizes are reported as incident rate ratios (IRR) with 95 per cent confidence intervals. RESULTS: Some 5599 surgical trainees in 2019, and 5310 in surgical specialty training in 2020 were included. The IRR was reduced across all specialties as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic (0.62; 95 per cent c.i. 0.60 to 0.64). Elective surgery (0.53; 95 per cent c.i. 0.50 to 0.56) was affected more than emergency surgery (0.85; 95 per cent c.i. 0.84 to 0.87). Regional variation indicating reduced operative activity was demonstrated across all specialties. More than 1 in 8 trainees in the final year of training have had their training extended and more than a quarter of trainees entering their final year of training are behind their expected training trajectory. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a major effect on surgical training in the UK. Urgent, coordinated action is required to minimize the impacts from the reduction in training in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Pandemics , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
11.
Eur J Pediatr Surg ; 31(4): 319-325, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281760

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted our way of living in an unprecedented manner. Medical professionals at all levels have been forced to adapt to the novel virus. The delivery of surgical services and the subsequent learning opportunities for surgical residents have especially been disrupted and the pediatric surgical community has not been exempted by this. This article highlights the challenges imposed by the pandemic and outlines the various learning modalities that can be implemented to ensure continued learning opportunities throughout the pandemic and beyond. Furthermore, it aims to show how the utilization and expansion of technologies maintain and further increase the communication, as well as the exchange of and access to knowledge among peers. Virtual education-, application-, and simulation-based learning and social media, as well as telemedicine and online conferences, will play a considerable role in the future of surgical specialties and surgical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/trends , Pediatrics/education , Specialties, Surgical/education , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Competence , Simulation Training , Social Media , Telemedicine
12.
J Vasc Surg ; 74(4): 1354-1361.e4, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237797

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Integrated vascular surgery residency is among the most competitive specialties, but little is known about the applicant perspective. The coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak impacted the 2021 integrated vascular surgery residency match because of travel restrictions. We sought to better understand pre-pandemic applicant recruitment strategies, logistics of away rotations, and the residency interview process to identify areas for improvement in the application process. METHODS: An anonymous survey was sent to matched students in 2020, inquiring about motivations for pursuing vascular surgery (VS), logistic of away rotations and interviews, and factors influencing students' rank lists. RESULTS: Seventy of the 73 matched students completed the survey (95.9% response rate). The median age was 27 (range, 25-41); 32.9% were female, 91.4% were U.S. medical students, and 77.1% were from institutions with a VS training program. Factors most strongly influencing the decision to choose VS as a career were interest in open vascular procedures, endovascular procedures, perceived job satisfaction, emerging technologies, and influence of a mentor. The prospect of the job market, future salary, and competitiveness of the application process had the least impact. Of the matched students, 82.9% completed an away rotation (median, 2; range, 1-4), with 51.7% of students paying a total cost of more than $2500. Fifty percent of students matched either at their home institution or where they had performed an away rotation. Students reported application submissions to a median of 50 programs (range, 1-70) and interviewed at 17 (range, 1-28), with 40% of students paying a total of more than $4000 for interview costs. The most significant factors affecting students' rank lists included program culture, open aortic surgical volume, geography, and complex endovascular procedure volume. Tours of facilities, resident salary, and male/female distribution had the least importance. CONCLUSIONS: Successfully matched applicants in 2020 prioritized operative case volume and program collegiality when ranking programs. Despite their high cost, away rotations played an important role in the Match, suggesting that time spent at potential institutions allowed ideal assessment of factors for students. The high average number of away rotations and in-person interviews performed in 2019-2020 was limited for the 2021 Match due to coronavirus disease 2019 restrictions. Programs will have to continue developing creative alternatives or additions to away rotations and the application processes to assure continued success in future post-pandemic Match cycles.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Male , Mentors , Motivation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical/education , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Travel
14.
BJS Open ; 5(2)2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic had a profound impact on surgical services, potentially having a detrimental impact on training opportunities. The aim of this global survey was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on surgical training and to develop a framework for recovery. METHODS: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted. This was designed by a steering committee of medical educationalists and validated by a group of trainees before dissemination. RESULTS: A total of 608 responses were obtained from 34 countries and 15 specialties. The results demonstrated major disruption in all aspects of training. The impact was greatest for conferences (525 of 608) and hands-on courses (517 of 608), but less for inpatient care-related training (268 of 608). European trainees were significantly more likely to experience direct training disruption than trainees in Asia (odds ratio 0.15) or Australia (OR 0.10) (χ2 = 87.162, P < 0.001). Alternative training resources (webinars, 359 of 608; educational videos, 234 of 608) have emerged, although trainees expressed some dissatisfaction with them. The collective responses generated a four-pillar framework for training recovery that involved: guidance from training stakeholders with the involvement of trainees; prioritization of training, especially the roles of senior surgeons/trainers; provision of access to alternative/new teaching methods; and measures to address trainee anxiety. CONCLUSION: Training has been greatly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The introduction of new teaching methods and a focus on training after the pandemic are imperative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Female , Global Health , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): e125-e126, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132687

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has highlighted existing systemic inequities that adversely affect a variety of communities in the United States. These inequities have a direct and adverse impact on the healthcare of our patient population. While civic engagement has not been cultivated in surgical and anesthesia training, we maintain that it is inherent to the core role of the role of a physician. This is supported by moral imperative, professional responsibility, and a legal obligation. We propose that such civic engagement and social justice activism is a neglected, but necessary aspect of physician training. We propose the implementation of a civic advocacy education agenda across department, community and national platforms. Surgical and anesthesiology residency training needs to evolve to the meet these increasing demands.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities , Physician's Role , Social Justice/education , Specialties, Surgical/education , Anesthesiology/ethics , Education, Medical, Graduate/ethics , Health Policy , Healthcare Disparities/ethics , Humans , Patient Advocacy/education , Patient Advocacy/ethics , Social Justice/ethics , Specialties, Surgical/ethics , United States
16.
Int J Surg ; 88: 105903, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114457

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant changes to healthcare systems which impact the delivery of surgical training. This study aimed to investigate the qualitative impact of COVID-19 on surgical training in the United Kingdom (UK) & Republic of Ireland (ROI) METHODS: This national, collaborative, cross-sectional study involving 13 surgical trainee associations distributed a pan-surgical specialty questionnaire on the impact of COVID-19 on surgical training over 4 weeks in May 2020. Various aspects of training were assessed. RESULTS: 810 completed responses were analysed (males = 401, females = 390) from all deaneries and training grades. The perceived negative overall impact of the pandemic on surgical training experience was significant. (Weighted average = 8.66). 41% of respondents (n = 301) were redeployed with 74% redeployed for >4 weeks. Complete loss of training was reported in elective operating (69.5%), outpatient activity (67.3%) and endoscopy (69.5%). A reduction of >50% was reported in emergency operating (48%) and completion of work-based assessments (WBAs) (46%). 3.3% (n = 17) of respondents reported plans to leave medicine altogether. Cancellations in study leave and regional teaching programmes without rescheduling were reported in 72% and 60% of the cohort respectively. Elective operative exposure and WBAs completion were the primary reported factors affecting potential trainee progression. Only 9% of trainees reported that they would definitely meet all required competencies. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has had a negative impact on surgical training across all grades and specialties, with implications for trainee progression, recruitment and retention of the surgical workforce. Further investigation of the long-term impact at a national level is required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialties, Surgical/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Graduate , Female , Humans , Ireland , Male , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
17.
J Surg Res ; 264: 534-543, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare systems and surgical residency training programs have been significantly affected by the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A shelter-in-place and social distancing mandate went into effect in our county on March 16, 2020, considerably altering clinical and educational operations. Along with the suspension of elective procedures, resident academic curricula transitioned to an entirely virtual platform. We aimed to evaluate the impact of these modifications on surgical training and resident concerns about COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We surveyed residents and fellows from all eight surgical specialties at our institution regarding their COVID-19 experiences from March to May 2020. Residents completed the survey via a secure Qualtrics link. A total of 38 questions addressed demographic information and perspectives regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical training, education, and general coping during the pandemic. RESULTS: Of 256 eligible participants across surgical specialties, 146 completed the survey (57.0%). Junior residents comprised 43.6% (n = 61), compared to seniors 37.1% (n = 52) and fellows 19.3% (n = 27). Most participants, 97.9% (n = 138), anticipated being able to complete their academic year on time, and 75.2% (n = 100) perceived virtual learning to be the same as or better than in-person didactic sessions. Participants were most concerned about their ability to have sufficient knowledge and skills to care for patients with COVID-19, and the possibility of exposure to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Although COVID-19 impacted residents' overall teaching and clinical volume, residency programs may identify novel virtual opportunities to meet their educational and research milestones during these challenging times.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
18.
Transpl Int ; 34(2): 220-223, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066770

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 challenges to keep a valuable educational offer with lockdown measures and social distancing are reviewed. Scientific Societies had to think of new alternatives to maintain meetings with conversion to a virtual format and development of online resources, rapidly available and broadly accessible. Other in person activities as face-to-face clinics have been substituted by telemedicine; the same happened with surgical training in theatre, given the suspension of most of the operations. Finally, the need to share and communicate in a continuous evolving scenario, has impacted negatively the integrity of peer review process, not following the normal procedures to ensure scientific integrity and reproducibility in the earliest phases of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Specialties, Surgical/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Biomedical Research/standards , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Peer Review, Research/standards , Peer Review, Research/trends , Periodicals as Topic/standards , Periodicals as Topic/trends , Physical Distancing
19.
Am J Surg ; 222(2): 248-253, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Eight novel virtual surgery electives (VSEs) were developed and implemented in April-May 2020 for medical students forced to continue their education remotely due to COVID-19. METHODS: Each VSE was 1-2 weeks long, contained specialty-specific course objectives, and included a variety of teaching modalities. Students completed a post-course survey to assess changes in their interest and understanding of the specialty. Quantitative methods were employed to analyze the results. RESULTS: Eighty-three students participated in the electives and 67 (80.7%) completed the post-course survey. Forty-six (68.7%) respondents reported "increased" or "greatly increased" interest in the course specialty completed. Survey respondents' post-course understanding of each specialty increased by a statistically significant amount (p-value = <0.0001). CONCLUSION: This initial effort demonstrated that VSEs can be an effective tool for increasing medical students' interest in and understanding of surgical specialties. They should be studied further with more rigorous methods in a larger population.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Career Choice , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Learning , Pandemics/prevention & control , Program Evaluation , Smartphone , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/instrumentation
20.
Surgeon ; 19(5): e199-e206, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919514

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The covid-19 pandemic has dramatically changed lives of residents and medical students. In particular, the learning process has undergone widely changes, especially due to the rules of social distancing which have forced universities and various institutes to modify lessons, work shifts and internships. PURPOSE: The purpose of our review is to evaluate how the various institutes have faced the covid-19 emergency and guaranteed the perpetuation of the learning process of resident and students. METHODS: A comprehensive search of the medical literature in PubMed and Google Scholar was performed including all the works explaining how the institutes have reorganized teaching for resident and undergraduate students. MAIN FINDINGS: The use of internet for the dissemination of teaching material and educational meetings has built bridges, albeit virtual, between resident and teachers. New techniques for teaching and conducting exams have been introduced. The rotating team system allowed the continuation of the teaching activity in safety. CONCLUSION: Thanks to remodulation of the teach modalities, the massive use of internet platforms, a wise distribution of work shifts, and others, universities and hospitals have not only reduced the impact on the learning process of resident and students but also turn this pandemic into a moment of personal and professional growth for the new generation of healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Specialties, Surgical/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
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