Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 124
Filter
1.
J Virol ; 96(17): e0114022, 2022 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001778

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variants were first detected in November 2021, and several Omicron lineages (BA.1, BA.2, BA.3, BA.4, and BA.5) have since rapidly emerged. Studies characterizing the mechanisms of Omicron variant infection and sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies induced upon vaccination are ongoing by several groups. In the present study, we used pseudoviruses to show that the transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) enhances infection of BA.1, BA.1.1, BA.2, and BA.3 Omicron variants to a lesser extent than ancestral D614G. We further show that Omicron variants have higher sensitivity to inhibition by soluble angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and the endosomal inhibitor chloroquine compared to D614G. The Omicron variants also more efficiently used ACE2 receptors from 9 out of 10 animal species tested, and unlike the D614G variant, used mouse ACE2 due to the Q493R and Q498R spike substitutions. Finally, neutralization of the Omicron variants by antibodies induced by three doses of Pfizer/BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine was 7- to 8-fold less potent than the D614G. These results provide insights into the transmissibility and immune evasion capacity of the emerging Omicron variants to curb their ongoing spread. IMPORTANCE The ongoing emergence of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variants with an extensive number of spike mutations poses a significant public health and zoonotic concern due to enhanced transmission fitness and escape from neutralizing antibodies. We studied three Omicron lineage variants (BA.1, BA.2, and BA.3) and found that transmembrane serine protease 2 has less influence on Omicron entry into cells than on D614G, and Omicron exhibits greater sensitivity to endosomal entry inhibition compared to D614G. In addition, Omicron displays more efficient usage of diverse animal species ACE2 receptors than D614G. Furthermore, due to Q493R/Q498R substitutions in spike, Omicron, but not D614G, can use the mouse ACE2 receptor. Finally, three doses of Pfizer/BNT162b2 mRNA vaccination elicit high neutralization titers against Omicron variants, although the neutralization titers are still 7- to 8-fold lower those that against D614G. These results may give insights into the transmissibility and immune evasion capacity of the emerging Omicron variants to curb their ongoing spread.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 , Immune Evasion , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , BNT162 Vaccine/administration & dosage , BNT162 Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immune Evasion/immunology , Mice , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
2.
Innate Immun ; 28(3-4): 107-121, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854721

ABSTRACT

Species differences in the structure and function of the immune system of laboratory animals are known to exist and have been reviewed extensively. However, the number and diversity of wild and exotic species, along with their associated viruses, that come into contact with humans has increased worldwide sometimes with lethal consequences. Far less is known about the immunobiology of these exotic and wild species. Data suggest that species differences of the mechanisms of inflammation, innate immunity and adaptive immunity are all involved in the establishment and maintenance of viral infections across reservoir hosts. The current review attempts to collect relevant data concerning the basics of innate and adaptive immune functions of exotic and wild species followed by identification of those differences that may play a role in the maintenance of viral infections in reservoir hosts.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera , Virus Diseases , Animals , Immune System , Immunity, Innate , Pangolins , Species Specificity
3.
Cell Rep ; 38(7): 110387, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654154

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) display enhanced transmissibility and resistance to antibody neutralization. Comparing the early 2020 isolate EU-1 to the VOCs Alpha, Beta, and Gamma in mice transgenic for human ACE2 reveals that VOCs induce a broadened scope of symptoms, expand systemic infection to the gastrointestinal tract, elicit the depletion of natural killer cells, and trigger variant-specific cytokine production patterns. Gamma infections result in accelerated disease progression associated with increased immune activation and inflammation. All four SARS-CoV-2 variants induce pDC depletion in the lungs, paralleled by reduced interferon responses. Remarkably, VOCs also use the murine ACE2 receptor for infection to replicate in the lungs of wild-type animals, which induce cellular and innate immune responses that apparently curtail the spread of overt disease. VOCs thus display distinct intrinsic pathogenic properties with broadened tissue and host range. The enhanced pathogenicity of VOCs and their potential for reverse zoonotic transmission pose challenges to clinical and pandemic management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Host Specificity , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Mice , Species Specificity , Viral Load , Viral Tropism , Virulence , Virus Replication
4.
Antiviral Res ; 198: 105253, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654044

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VoCs) has exacerbated the COVID-19 pandemic. End of November 2021, a new SARS-CoV-2 variant namely the omicron (B.1.1.529) emerged. Since this omicron variant is heavily mutated in the spike protein, WHO classified this variant as the 5th variant of concern (VoC). We previously demonstrated that the ancestral strain and the other SARS-CoV-2 VoCs replicate efficiently in and cause a COVID19-like pathology in Syrian hamsters. We here wanted to explore the infectivity of the omicron variant in comparison to the ancestral D614G strain in the hamster model. Strikingly, in hamsters that had been infected with the omicron variant, a 3 log10 lower viral RNA load was detected in the lungs as compared to animals infected with D614G and no infectious virus was detectable in this organ. Moreover, histopathological examination of the lungs from omicron-infected hamsters revealed no signs of peri-bronchial inflammation or bronchopneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Disease Models, Animal , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Animals , Cricetinae , Humans , Lung/virology , Mesocricetus/virology , Species Specificity , Viral Load
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622609

ABSTRACT

Kiwifruit is moderately sweet and sour and quite popular among consumers; it has been widely planted in some areas of the world. In 2019, the crown gall disease of kiwifruit was discovered in the main kiwifruit-producing area of Guizhou Province, China. This disease can weaken and eventually cause the death of the tree. The phylogeny, morphological and biological characteristics of the bacteria were described, and were related to diseases. The pathogenicity of this species follows the Koch hypothesis, confirming that A. fabacearum is the pathogen of crown gall disease of kiwifruit in China. In this study, Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) analysis for genome-specific gene sequences was developed for the specific detection of A. fabacearum. The detection limit of the LAMP method is 5 × 10-7 ng/µL, which has high sensitivity. At the same time, the amplified product is stained with SYBR Green I after the reaction is completed, so that the amplification can be detected with the naked eye. LAMP analysis detected the presence of A. fabacearum in the roots and soil samples of the infected kiwifruit plant. The proposed LAMP detection technology in this study offers the advantages of ease of operation, visibility of results, rapidity, accuracy and high sensitivity, making it suitable for the early diagnosis of crown gall disease of kiwifruit.


Subject(s)
Actinidia/microbiology , Agrobacterium/physiology , Fruit/microbiology , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Plant Tumors/microbiology , Agrobacterium/pathogenicity , Base Sequence , China , Phylogeny , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Species Specificity
6.
Viruses ; 14(1)2022 01 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611142

ABSTRACT

We found and genetically described two novel SARS-like coronaviruses in feces and oral swabs of the greater (R. ferrumequinum) and the lesser (R. hipposideros) horseshoe bats in southern regions of Russia. The viruses, named Khosta-1 and Khosta-2, together with related viruses from Bulgaria and Kenya, form a separate phylogenetic lineage. We found evidence of recombination events in the evolutionary history of Khosta-1, which involved the acquisition of the structural proteins S, E, and M, as well as the nonstructural genes ORF3, ORF6, ORF7a, and ORF7b, from a virus that is related to the Kenyan isolate BtKY72. The examination of bats by RT-PCR revealed that 62.5% of the greater horseshoe bats in one of the caves were positive for Khosta-1 virus, while its overall prevalence was 14%. The prevalence of Khosta-2 was 1.75%. Our results show that SARS-like coronaviruses circulate in horseshoe bats in the region, and we provide new data on their genetic diversity.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/virology , SARS Virus/genetics , Animals , Base Sequence , Chiroptera/classification , Evolution, Molecular , Feces/virology , Metagenomics , Mouth/virology , Phylogeny , Prevalence , Recombination, Genetic , Russia , SARS Virus/classification , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 807134, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604257

ABSTRACT

ORF8 is a viral immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain protein encoded by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA genome. It tends to evolve rapidly and interfere with immune responses. However, the structural characteristics of various coronavirus ORF8 proteins and their subsequent effects on biological functions remain unclear. Herein, we determined the crystal structures of SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 (S84) (one of the epidemic isoforms) and the bat coronavirus RaTG13 ORF8 variant at 1.62 Å and 1.76 Å resolution, respectively. Comparison of these ORF8 proteins demonstrates that the 62-77 residues in Ig-like domain of coronavirus ORF8 adopt different conformations. Combined with mutagenesis assays, the residue Cys20 of ORF8 is responsible for forming the covalent disulfide-linked dimer in crystal packing and in vitro biochemical conditions. Furthermore, immune cell-binding assays indicate that various ORF8 (SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 (L84), ORF8 (S84), and RaTG13 ORF8) proteins have different interaction capabilities with human CD14+ monocytes in human peripheral blood. These results provide new insights into the specific characteristics of various coronavirus ORF8 and suggest that ORF8 variants may influence disease-related immune responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Chiroptera/immunology , Immunity/immunology , Immunoglobulin Domains/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Animals , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chiroptera/genetics , Chiroptera/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Immunoglobulin Domains/genetics , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/immunology , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Mutation , Protein Binding , Species Specificity , Viral Proteins/classification , Viral Proteins/genetics
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 735866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1590052

ABSTRACT

Bats are the only mammals with self-powered flight and account for 20% of all extant mammalian diversity. In addition, they harbor many emerging and reemerging viruses, including multiple coronaviruses, several of which are highly pathogenic in other mammals, but cause no disease in bats. How this symbiotic relationship between bats and viruses exists is not yet fully understood. Existing evidence supports a specific role for the innate immune system, in particular type I interferon (IFN) responses, a major component of antiviral immunity. Previous studies in bats have shown that components of the IFN pathway are constitutively activated at the transcriptional level. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the type I IFN response in bats is also constitutively activated at the protein level. For this, we utilized highly sensitive Single Molecule (Simoa) digital ELISA assays, previously developed for humans that we adapted to bat samples. We prospectively sampled four non-native chiroptera species from French zoos. We identified a constitutive expression of IFNα protein in the circulation of healthy bats, and concentrations that are physiologically active in humans. Expression levels differed according to the species examined, but were not associated with age, sex, or health status suggesting constitutive IFNα protein expression independent of disease. These results confirm a unique IFN response in bat species that may explain their ability to coexist with multiple viruses in the absence of pathology. These results may help to manage potential zoonotic viral reservoirs and potentially identify new anti-viral strategies.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/blood , Immunity, Innate , Interferon-alpha/blood , Viruses/immunology , Animals , Cell Line , Chiroptera/genetics , Chiroptera/immunology , Chiroptera/virology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Interferon-alpha/genetics , Species Specificity , Symbiosis , Transcription, Genetic , Viruses/pathogenicity
9.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595265

ABSTRACT

Infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) provokes a potentially fatal pneumonia with multiorgan failure, and high systemic inflammation. To gain mechanistic insight and ferret out the root of this immune dysregulation, we modeled, by in vitro coculture, the interactions between infected epithelial cells and immunocytes. A strong response was induced in monocytes and B cells, with a SARS-CoV-2-specific inflammatory gene cluster distinct from that seen in influenza A or Ebola virus-infected cocultures, and which reproduced deviations reported in blood or lung myeloid cells from COVID-19 patients. A substantial fraction of the effect could be reproduced after individual transfection of several SARS-CoV-2 proteins (Spike and some nonstructural proteins), mediated by soluble factors, but not via transcriptional induction. This response was greatly muted in monocytes from healthy children, perhaps a clue to the age dependency of COVID-19. These results suggest that the inflammatory malfunction in COVID-19 is rooted in the earliest perturbations that SARS-CoV-2 induces in epithelia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Coculture Techniques , Ebolavirus/pathogenicity , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Inflammation , Influenza A virus/pathogenicity , Lung/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Species Specificity , Viral Proteins/immunology
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 24145, 2021 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585802

ABSTRACT

Recent studies suggest that coronaviruses circulate widely in Southeast Asian bat species and that the progenitors of the SARS-Cov-2 virus could have originated in rhinolophid bats in the region. Our objective was to assess the diversity and circulation patterns of coronavirus in several bat species in Southeast Asia. We undertook monthly live-capture sessions and sampling in Cambodia over 17 months to cover all phases of the annual reproduction cycle of bats and test specifically the association between their age and CoV infection status. We additionally examined current information on the reproductive phenology of Rhinolophus and other bat species presently known to occur in mainland southeast China, Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Results from our longitudinal monitoring (573 bats belonging to 8 species) showed an overall proportion of positive PCR tests for CoV of 4.2% (24/573) in cave-dwelling bats from Kampot and 4.75% (22/463) in flying-foxes from Kandal. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the PCR amplicon sequences of CoVs (n = 46) obtained clustered in Alphacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus. Interestingly, Hipposideros larvatus sensu lato harbored viruses from both genera. Our results suggest an association between positive detections of coronaviruses and juvenile and immature bats in Cambodia (OR = 3.24 [1.46-7.76], p = 0.005). Since the limited data presently available from literature review indicates that reproduction is largely synchronized among rhinolophid and hipposiderid bats in our study region, particularly in its more seasonal portions (above 16° N), this may lead to seasonal patterns in CoV circulation. Overall, our study suggests that surveillance of CoV in insectivorous bat species in Southeast Asia, including SARS-CoV-related coronaviruses in rhinolophid bats, could be targeted from June to October for species exhibiting high proportions of juveniles and immatures during these months. It also highlights the need to develop long-term longitudinal surveys of bats and improve our understanding of their ecology in the region, for both biodiversity conservation and public health reasons.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Chiroptera/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/classification , Animals , Asia, Southeastern/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/classification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cambodia/epidemiology , Chiroptera/classification , Chiroptera/virology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Evolution, Molecular , Genome, Viral/genetics , Geography , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Species Specificity
11.
Biochem J ; 478(19): 3671-3684, 2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557441

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the clinical syndrome caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has rapidly spread globally causing hundreds of millions of infections and over two million deaths. The potential animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV-2 are currently unknown, however sequence analysis has provided plausible potential candidate species. SARS-CoV-2 binds to the angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) to enable its entry into host cells and establish infection. We analyzed the binding surface of ACE2 from several important animal species to begin to understand the parameters for the ACE2 recognition by the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD). We employed Shannon entropy analysis to determine the variability of ACE2 across its sequence and particularly in its RBD interacting region, and assessed differences between various species' ACE2 and human ACE2. Recombinant ACE2 from human, hamster, horseshoe bat, cat, ferret, and cow were evaluated for RBD binding. A gradient of binding affinities were seen where human and hamster ACE2 were similarly in the low nanomolar range, followed by cat and cow. Surprisingly, horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus sinicus) and ferret (Mustela putorius) ACE2s had poor binding activity compared with the other species' ACE2. The residue differences and binding properties between the species' variants provide a framework for understanding ACE2-RBD binding and virus tropism.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cats , Dogs , Humans , Mice , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Tropism
12.
Nat Immunol ; 22(12): 1479-1489, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537327

ABSTRACT

The extreme diversity of the human immune system, forged and maintained throughout evolutionary history, provides a potent defense against opportunistic pathogens. At the same time, this immune variation is the substrate upon which a plethora of immune-associated diseases develop. Genetic analysis suggests that thousands of individually weak loci together drive up to half of the observed immune variation. Intense selection maintains this genetic diversity, even selecting for the introgressed Neanderthal or Denisovan alleles that have reintroduced variation lost during the out-of-Africa migration. Variations in age, sex, diet, environmental exposure, and microbiome each potentially explain the residual variation, with proof-of-concept studies demonstrating both plausible mechanisms and correlative associations. The confounding interaction of many of these variables currently makes it difficult to assign definitive contributions. Here, we review the current state of play in the field, identify the key unknowns in the causality of immune variation, and identify the multidisciplinary pathways toward an improved understanding.


Subject(s)
Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Variation , Immune System/physiology , Age Factors , Diet , Female , Gene-Environment Interaction , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Male , Microbiota/immunology , Sex Factors , Species Specificity
13.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 6855, 2021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537312

ABSTRACT

The bat sarbecovirus RaTG13 is a close relative of SARS-CoV-2, the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, this bat virus was most likely unable to directly infect humans since its Spike (S) protein does not interact efficiently with the human ACE2 receptor. Here, we show that a single T403R mutation increases binding of RaTG13 S to human ACE2 and allows VSV pseudoparticle infection of human lung cells and intestinal organoids. Conversely, mutation of R403T in the SARS-CoV-2 S reduces pseudoparticle infection and viral replication. The T403R RaTG13 S is neutralized by sera from individuals vaccinated against COVID-19 indicating that vaccination might protect against future zoonoses. Our data suggest that a positively charged amino acid at position 403 in the S protein is critical for efficient utilization of human ACE2 by S proteins of bat coronaviruses. This finding could help to better predict the zoonotic potential of animal coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Caco-2 Cells , Cloning, Molecular , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Mutation , Replicon , Species Specificity , Stem Cells , Zoonoses
14.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(11)2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533883

ABSTRACT

Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3), a crucial effector of the host's innate immune system, prohibits an extensive range of viruses. Previous studies have reported that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the IFITM3 gene are associated with the expression level and length of the IFITM3 protein and can impact susceptibility to infectious viruses and the severity of infection with these viruses. However, there have been no studies on polymorphisms of the bovine IFITM3 gene. In the present study, we finely mapped the bovine IFITM3 gene and annotated the identified polymorphisms. We investigated polymorphisms of the bovine IFITM3 gene in 108 Hanwoo and 113 Holstein cattle using direct sequencing and analyzed genotype, allele, and haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the IFITM3 genes of the two cattle breeds. In addition, we analyzed transcription factor-binding sites and transcriptional capacity using PROMO and luciferase assays, respectively. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of a nonsynonymous SNP of the IFITM3 gene using PolyPhen-2, PANTHER, and PROVEAN. We identified 23 polymorphisms in the bovine IFITM3 gene and found significantly different genotype, allele, and haplotype frequency distributions and LD scores between polymorphisms of the bovine IFITM3 gene in Hanwoo and Holstein cattle. In addition, the ability to bind the transcription factor Nkx2-1 and transcriptional capacities were significantly different depending on the c.-193T > C allele. Furthermore, nonsynonymous SNP (F121L) was predicted to be benign. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic study of bovine IFITM3 polymorphisms.


Subject(s)
Cattle/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid/genetics , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Gene Expression Regulation , Gene Frequency , Genotype , Haplotypes , Interferons/metabolism , Linkage Disequilibrium , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Species Specificity , Thyroid Nuclear Factor 1/physiology , Transcriptional Activation/genetics
15.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 193(Pt B): 2113-2120, 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509846

ABSTRACT

Three dimensional structures of (chymo)trypsin-like proteinase (3CLpro) from SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV differ at 8 positions. We previously found that the Val86Leu, Lys88Arg, Phe134His, and Asn180Lys mutations in these enzymes can change the orientation of the N- and C-terminal domains of 3CLpro relative to each other, which leads to a change in catalytic activity. This conclusion was derived from the comparison of the structural catalytic core in 169 (chymo)trypsin-like proteinases with the serine/cysteine fold. Val35Thr, Ser46Ala, Asn65Ser, Ala94Ser mutations were not included in that analysis, since they are located far from the catalytic tetrad. In the present work, the structural and functional roles of these variable amino acids at positions 35, 46, 65, and 94 in the 3CLpro sequences of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV have been established using a comparison of the same set of proteinases leading to the identification of new conservative elements. Comparative analysis showed that, in addition to interdomain mobility, which could modulate catalytic activity, the 3CLpro(s) can use for functional regulation an autolytic loop and the unique Asp33-Asn95 region (the Asp33-Asn95 Zone) in the N-terminal domain. Therefore, all 4 analyzed mutation sites are associated with the unique structure-functional features of the 3CLpro from SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV. Strictly speaking, the presented structural results are hypothetical, since at present there is not a single experimental work on the identification and characterization of autolysis sites in these proteases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Mutation, Missense , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Amino Acid Substitution , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , Humans , Protein Domains , SARS Virus/enzymology , SARS Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Species Specificity , Structure-Activity Relationship
16.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 2199-2201, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505680

ABSTRACT

We report pilot studies to evaluate the susceptibility of common domestic livestock (cattle, sheep, goat, alpaca, rabbit, and horse) to intranasal infection with SARS-CoV-2. None of the infected animals shed infectious virus via nasal, oral, or faecal routes, although viral RNA was detected in several animals. Further, neutralizing antibody titres were low or non-existent one month following infection. These results suggest that domestic livestock are unlikely to contribute to SARS-CoV-2 epidemiology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Host Specificity , Livestock/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Camelids, New World/virology , Cattle/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Goats/virology , Horses/virology , Host Specificity/immunology , Humans , Nasal Cavity/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , Rabbits/virology , Rectum/virology , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sheep/virology , Species Specificity , Vero Cells , Virus Shedding , Viscera/virology
17.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 86-97, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cultured cell lines are widely used for research in the physiology, pathophysiology, toxicology, and pharmacology of the renal proximal tubule. The lines that are most appropriate for a given use depend upon the genes expressed. New tools for transcriptomic profiling using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) make it possible to catalog expressed genes in each cell line. METHODS: Fourteen different proximal tubule cell lines, representing six species, were grown on permeable supports under conditions specific for the respective lines. RNA-Seq followed standard procedures. RESULTS: Transcripts expressed in cell lines variably matched transcripts selectively expressed in native proximal tubule. Opossum kidney (OK) cells displayed the highest percentage match (45% of proximal marker genes [TPM threshold =15]), with pig kidney cells (LLC-PK1) close behind (39%). Lower-percentage matches were seen for various human lines, including HK-2 (26%), and lines from rodent kidneys, such as NRK-52E (23%). Nominally, identical OK cells from different sources differed substantially in expression of proximal tubule markers. Mapping cell line transcriptomes to gene sets for various proximal tubule functions (sodium and water transport, protein transport, metabolic functions, endocrine functions) showed that different lines may be optimal for experimentally modeling each function. An online resource (https://esbl.nhlbi.nih.gov/JBrowse/KCT/) has been created to interrogate cell line transcriptome data. Proteomic analysis of NRK-52E cells confirmed low expression of many proximal tubule marker proteins. CONCLUSIONS: No cell line fully matched the transcriptome of native proximal tubule cells. However, some of the lines tested are suitable for the study of particular metabolic and transport processes seen in the proximal tubule.


Subject(s)
Cell Culture Techniques/methods , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/metabolism , Transcriptome , Animals , Biological Transport , Cell Line , Chromatography, Liquid , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Internet , Mice , Opossums , Proteomics , RNA-Seq , Rats , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Species Specificity , Swine , Tandem Mass Spectrometry
18.
J Virol ; 95(21): e0059721, 2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483991

ABSTRACT

Frankliniella occidentalis (western flower thrips [WFT]) and Thrips tabaci (onion thrips [OT]) are insect species that greatly impact horticultural crops through direct damage and their efficient vectoring of tomato spotted wilt virus and iris yellow spot virus. In this study, we collected thrips of these species from 12 field populations in various regions in Italy. We also included one field population of Neohydatothrips variabilis (soybean thrips [ST]) from the United States. Total RNA data from high-throughput sequencing (HTS) were used to assemble the virome, and then we assigned putative viral contigs to each thrips sample by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). Excluding plant and fungal viruses, we were able to identify 61 viral segments, corresponding to 41 viruses: 14 were assigned to WFT, 17 to OT, and 1 to ST; 9 viruses could not be assigned to any species based on our stringent criteria. All these viruses are putative representative of new species (with only the exception of a sobemo-like virus that is 100% identical to a virus recently characterized in ST) and some belong to new higher-ranking taxa. These additions to the viral phylogeny suggest previously undescribed evolutionary niches. Most of Baltimore's classes of RNA viruses were present (positive- and minus-strand and double-stranded RNA viruses), but only one DNA virus was identified in our collection. Repeated sampling in a subset of locations in 2019 and 2020 and further virus characterization in a subset of four thrips populations maintained in the laboratory allowed us to provide evidence of a locally persistent thrips core virome that characterizes each population. IMPORTANCE Harnessing the insect microbiome can result in new approaches to contain their populations or the damage they cause vectoring viruses of medical, veterinary, or agricultural importance. Persistent insect viruses are a neglected component of their microbiota. In this study, for the first time, we characterize the virome associated with the two model systems for tospovirus-transmitting thrips species, of utmost importance for the direct and indirect damage they cause to a number of different crops. The thrips virome characterized includes several novel viruses, which in some cases reveal previously undescribed clades. More importantly, some of the viruses we describe are part of a core virome that is specific and consistently present in distinct geographical locations monitored over the years, hinting at a possible mutualistic symbiotic relationship with their host.


Subject(s)
Insect Vectors/virology , Thysanoptera/virology , Tospovirus/classification , Tospovirus/genetics , Virome , Animals , Computational Biology/methods , Genome, Viral , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Phylogeny , Plant Diseases/virology , RNA Viruses/classification , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA, Viral , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Species Specificity
19.
J Vet Sci ; 22(6): e70, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485292

ABSTRACT

Bats are an important reservoir of several zoonotic diseases. However, the circulation of bat coronaviruses (BatCoV) in live animal markets in Indonesia has not been reported. Genetic characterization of BatCoV was performed by sequencing partial RdRp genes. Real-time polymerase chain reaction based on nucleocapsid protein (N) gene and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against the N protein were conducted to detect the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) viral RNA and antibody, respectively. We identified the presence of BatCoV on Cynopterus brachyotis, Macroglossus minimus, and Rousettus amplexicaudatus. The results showed that the BatCoV included in this study are from an unclassified coronavirus group. Notably, SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA and antibodies were not detected in the sampled bats.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Animals , Coronavirus/genetics , DNA, Viral/genetics , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/veterinary , Indonesia , Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/veterinary , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/veterinary , Species Specificity
20.
Front Immunol ; 12: 754642, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485059

ABSTRACT

Understanding SARS-CoV-2 immune pathology is critical for the development of effective vaccines and treatments. Here, we employed unbiased serial whole-blood transcriptome profiling by weighted gene network correlation analysis (WGCNA) at pre-specified timepoints of infection to understand SARS-CoV-2-related immune alterations in a cohort of rhesus macaques (RMs) and African green monkeys (AGMs) presenting with varying degrees of pulmonary pathology. We found that the bulk of transcriptional changes occurred at day 3 post-infection and normalized to pre-infection levels by 3 weeks. There was evidence of coordination of transcriptional networks in blood (defined by WGCNA) and the nasopharyngeal SARS-CoV-2 burden as well as the absolute monocyte count. Pathway analysis of gene modules revealed prominent regulation of type I and type II interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) in both RMs and AGMs, with the latter species exhibiting a greater breadth of ISG upregulation. Notably, pathways relating to neutrophil degranulation were enriched in blood of SARS-CoV-2 infected AGMs, but not RMs. Our results elude to hallmark similarities as well as differences in the RM and AGM acute response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and may help guide the selection of particular NHP species in modeling aspects of COVID-19 disease outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cell Degranulation , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/blood , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Macaca mulatta , Neutrophils/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Species Specificity
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL