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1.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(3): 1338-1353, 2022 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860447

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 caused a worldwide conversion from in-person therapy to telehealth; however, limited evidence to support the efficacy of remotely delivering standardized tests puts the future of widespread telehealth use at risk. The aim of this study is to investigate the reliability of scoring a speech sound assessment administered in real-world scenarios including two examples of telehealth technology. METHOD: A total of thirty-nine 3- to 8-year-olds were administered the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation-Third Edition. Licensed speech-language pathologists (SLPs) concurrently scored children's responses in person and in two telehealth conditions considered typical and enhanced. Mean standard scores and interrater reliability results were compared among the three conditions. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the frequency of technology and behavior disruptions during administration and the results of an SLP telehealth perception survey. RESULTS: All scoring conditions were found to be highly correlated, with mean differences revealing no systematic differences of one condition over- or underestimating another. Although response agreement was high (85%-87%), final sounds in words or sounds that are difficult to observe tended to attenuate reliability. Neither child nor technology disruptions affected SLPs' ability to score responses. Despite no significant differences between conditions on scoring reliability, SLP participants reported they continued to prefer in-person over a telehealth speech sound assessment. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the provision of a pediatric speech sound assessment using consumer-grade equipment, as in-person, typical telehealth, and enhanced telehealth scoring conditions produced similar results. However, SLP participants' skeptical attitudes toward remote delivery of standardized tests reveal an ongoing barrier to widespread telehealth use. SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.19593367.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Disorders , Speech-Language Pathology , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Phonetics , Reproducibility of Results , Speech
2.
Codas ; 34(6): e20210193, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855135

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has opened opportunities for service providers and patients to continue with clinical services in certain extraordinary settings and circumstances. Telerehabilitation in the field of speech language pathology in India is still at its infancy, with a majority of the Speech Language Pathologists (SLP) accustomed with the conventional face-to-face system of service delivery. The present study aims to gather the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of SLPs in India regarding telerehabilitation services during the pandemic. METHODS: The study was conducted in three phases: phase I involved the development and validation of a questionnaire to explore the KAP of SLPs regarding telerehabilitation services. The items were framed based on a Likert rating scale (strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree, and strongly disagree), yes-no-maybe format, open-ended, and multiple-choice format. Phase II involved data collection, while phase III involved data analysis. Descriptive statistics was done to derive the frequency and percentage for discrete variables and mean and SD for continuous variables. RESULTS: Many SLPs feel underprepared in their technical knowledge and skills needed for telerehabilitation. Furthermore, a majority of the SLPs also did report patients to be relatively lesser motivated and satisfied with tele practices due to issues that are discussed in the paper. CONCLUSION: This study is an initial attempt to touch upon the fabric of telerehabilitation services delivered by SLPs of India. Future studies are directed to study the technical, professional, and personal issues encountered during telerehabilitation services specifically pertaining to specific communication disabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Disorders , Speech-Language Pathology , Telerehabilitation , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Language , Pandemics , Pathologists , Speech
3.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 329-334, 2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788338

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This introduction presents the LSHSS Forum: Can You See My Screen? Virtual Assessment in Speech and Language. The goals of the forum are to document reliability and validity of assessment results conducted virtually, identify characteristics of measures that are suitable for online assessment, and provide clinical and research guidance for interpreting diagnostic results obtained in virtual settings. METHOD: In this introduction, we provide an overview of the research completed by nine teams, who submitted research articles and notes on a variety of topics pertinent to the theme of telehealth assessments. Of these, seven teams investigated the validity and reliability of 14 different assessment tools, while two teams described training and experience issues. CONCLUSION: The nine studies presented in this forum will provide speech-language pathologists with insight into a range of issues regarding telehealth assessment, including the breadth of suitable assessment tools; practical strategies for assessing children with a diverse range of ages, languages, skills, and abilities; and the unexpected challenges and opportunities of conducting clinical work and research during a global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Speech-Language Pathology , Speech , Child , Child Language , Humans , Language , Reproducibility of Results , Speech-Language Pathology/methods
4.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 233-236, 2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This prologue introduces the LSHSS Forum: Speech and Language Tele-Intervention: The Future Is Now. The aims of the forum are (a) to report on the process of moving established in-person interventions to virtual delivery and (b) to provide speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with empirically based guidance on designing and implementing tele-interventions, in order to support academic success for school-age children with speech and language needs. The included articles explore the process, benefits, and challenges of providing intervention in speech, language, and literacy domains in a virtual environment with children. CONCLUSION: Although there are some logistical challenges, established treatments such as those targeting morphosyntax as well as communication partner training can be adapted for successful delivery online. In addition, the forum supports the delivery of an app-based articulation-focused intervention. SLPs report a number of challenges in relation to adapting and delivering interventions through telepractice, and parents express concerns in relation to SLPs' online evaluation of complex speech sound difficulties for children born with cleft lip and palate. Finally, using the principles of Minimal Intervention Needed for Change, a systematic approach to the adaptation of evidence-based interventions for online delivery, is outlined.


Subject(s)
Cleft Lip , Cleft Palate , Speech-Language Pathology , Child , Humans , Language , Speech
5.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(2): 527-538, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788328

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to implement and track the outcomes of a yearlong, structured mentoring program aimed at enhancing the retention and success of underrepresented graduate and undergraduate students in speech-language pathology. METHOD: Student participants were recruited following an open application process and based on meeting eligibility requirements and committing to program completion. The focus of this program was to provide didactic training on leadership development, culturally responsive practice, and research methods used in speech-language pathology. This program emphasized participant needs assessments and goal-setting, access to one-on-one and group mentoring by peers and professionals, and a culminating experience in which participant teams completed a supervised clinical research project or a community outreach and education project. RESULTS: Forty-six participants in three cohorts completed the yearlong program in three consecutive years. Positive outcomes included program completion, degree completion, student perceptions of program benefit, completion of innovative community-engaged and research projects, and dissemination of scholarly work. CONCLUSION: Our findings from implementing this program and tracking its outcomes have implications for using innovative, equity-minded, and evidence-based strategies for retaining and mentoring minoritized students in speech-language pathology.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Speech-Language Pathology , Humans , Leadership , Mentors , Speech , Speech-Language Pathology/education , Students
6.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 335-359, 2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740499

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The global COVID-19 pandemic brought about widespread use of telepractice to provide services to children with communication disorders, including students who use aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) such as speech-generating devices. This descriptive quantitative study utilized network analysis to investigate the nature of speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') professional resource networks during the pandemic, including what aspects of their professional networks were associated with their confidence to use telepractice to serve students who use aided AAC and whether there were differences for school-based compared to nonschool-based SLPs. METHOD: Participants were 283 SLPs who responded to an online survey that consisted of closed- and open-ended survey items. A resource generator approach was used to gather data about SLPs' professional resource networks for AAC telepractice. RESULTS: SLPs varied widely in their confidence for AAC telepractice. School-based SLPs and SLPs who had 3 years or fewer of AAC experience reported lower confidence, whereas SLPs who spent more work time each week using telepractice and who accessed a greater number of different types of training reported higher confidence. The number of people in different roles providing personal support and the number of different electronic/print resources accessed were not significant predictors of SLPs' confidence. The majority of SLPs wanted additional training, support, or resources related to AAC telepractice. CONCLUSION: The findings from this research suggest the importance of SLPs' access to quality training and support in the areas of AAC and telepractice, particularly for school-based SLPs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Disorders , Speech-Language Pathology , Child , Communication , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(1): 30-43, 2022 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692516

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The impact of stuttering can be significant, and effective treatment is critical. Despite evidence supporting direct treatment approaches for school-age children who stutter, a complex set of barriers can prevent access at school. One potential solution is telepractice. To date, however, there is no published evidence regarding the use of telepractice to deliver the Lidcombe Program within a school setting. METHOD: In this pilot study, a telepractice service was established and the perspectives of the five treating speech-language pathologists (SLPs) were evaluated before, during, and after the trial through focus groups and recorded telesupervision sessions. RESULTS: An inductive and reflexive thematic analysis identified four main themes: (a) Understanding and managing technology is critical; (b) logistical considerations can be time-consuming and challenging; (c) preparation and support are essential; and (d) family engagement, acceptance, and independence with telepractice services can be facilitated by external support and coaching. Initially, the SLPs shared feelings of uncertainty, fear, and apprehension. Yet, despite this concern, the SLPs ultimately reported that telepractice can play an important role in their service. CONCLUSIONS: In order to maximize the potential value of telepractice, SLPs require training and support to (a) manage the technology and troubleshoot problems that invariably arise, (b) have the opportunity to watch demonstrations of the technology, and (c) clearly explain the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of the parent engaging in treatment. These findings have particular relevance now, as schools and support services navigate a COVID-safe delivery model for the indefinite future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Speech-Language Pathology , Stuttering , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Pathologists , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech , Stuttering/therapy
8.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(1): 181-192, 2022 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692514

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to explore how school-based speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') job satisfaction changed because of the COVID-19 global pandemic. We situated job satisfaction within the Conservation Resources (COR) theory. METHOD: We distributed a web-based survey to school-based SLPs throughout the United States. A total of 1,352 SLPs followed the link and 1,069 completed at least 90% of the survey. The survey was composed of four parts: (a) demographic information, (b) obstacles faced during COVID-19 school closures, (c) job satisfaction, and (d) self-efficacy. Self-efficacy was divided into three subscales: decision-making, instructional, and disciplinary. RESULTS: Nearly half (48%, n = 522) of the sample reported a decline in job satisfaction following COVID-19 school closures. Using a binomial logistic regression, we found that time pressures and disciplinary self-efficacy predicted this change in job satisfaction. Individuals who reported higher disciplinary self-efficacy and more pressures on their time were 1.2 times more likely to experience a decline in job satisfaction. Number of obstacles faced, caseload size, years of experience, and the additional two self-efficacy scales were not related to this change. CONCLUSIONS: Job satisfaction is considered a malleable resource within the COR theory. Indeed, we observed a change in this resource due to the rapid shift in service delivery methods, paired with variable levels of support and resources from school districts. Our results have implications for how administration may support SLPs in and out of times of acute crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Speech-Language Pathology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pathologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Speech , Speech-Language Pathology/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
9.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 445-453, 2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692515

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of school-age children with language impairment (LI) and their speech-language pathologists (SLPs) relied on telepractice service delivery models. Unfortunately, the dearth of evidence and procedural guidance available to SLPs has made this transition challenging at best. METHOD: The current study utilized a sample of 20 young children with LI to determine the feasibility of procedures necessary for conducting vocabulary assessments via telepractice platforms and the reliability of scoring participant responses using standardized assessments. RESULTS: Study findings resulted in numerous practical suggestions for SLPs working with young children with LI via telepractice. Results suggest that these adaptations result in strong interrater reliability for scoring participant responses in an online format. CONCLUSION: Study findings suggest that conducting telepractice assessments can be a useful and reliable tool for school-based SLPs, with implications reaching beyond the pandemic era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Disorders , Language Development Disorders , Speech-Language Pathology , Telemedicine , Child , Child, Preschool , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Language Development Disorders/diagnosis , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , Speech-Language Pathology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Vocabulary
10.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 81, 2022 Jan 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634365

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many professional services were pressed to adopt telepractice in response to the global coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic. The need to adopt a new service delivery approach quickly created different implementation challenges. This study explored the lived experiences of frontline clinicians who successfully transitioned their in-person speech-language therapy services to telepractice through an implementation science lens. METHODS: The study was conducted in partnership with one publicly funded program in Ontario, Canada that offers services to preschoolers with speech, language and communication disorders. Sixteen frontline speech-language pathologists and assistants at this organization shared their lived experience transitioning to telepractice during the pandemic during videoconference interviews. A narrative inquiry approach was used to analyze interview transcripts to identify the processes (or steps) this program took to implement telepractice and to understand the facilitators and barriers to telepractice implementation during the pandemic. RESULTS: The following six stages were identified from clinicians' narratives: abrupt lockdown; weeks of uncertainty; telepractice emerged as an option; preparation for telepractice; telepractice trials; and finally, full implementation of telepractice. The stages of events offered significant insights into how government public health measures influenced clinicians' decisions and their processes of adopting telepractice. In terms of barriers, clinicians reported a lack of knowledge, skills and experience with telepractice and a lack of technological support. The organization's learning climate and team approach to transitioning services were identified as the main facilitator of implementation. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest a need for better coordination of public health measures and professional services, which would have eased clinicians' stress and facilitated an earlier transition to telepractice. Fostering an organization's learning climate may improve organization's resilience in response to emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Disorders , Speech-Language Pathology , Telemedicine , Child, Preschool , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pathologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech
11.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262498, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629541

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The study aimed to investigate changes in the role of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) during the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia. It also assessed the SLPs' perceptions of delivering services using telehealth as a part of their everyday clinical practice before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: SLPs in Saudi Arabia were invited to complete a web-based survey covering questions related to changes to the role of SLPs during the COVID-19 pandemic, changes in the ways speech services are delivered; and the benefits and barriers of using telehealth in clinical practice as identified by SLPs. RESULTS: Ninety-one SLPs completed the survey. About 94% of the respondents experienced changes in their role as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The nature of changes they had experienced including decreased work time, providing support and counseling to patients or caregivers using the telephone, providing assessment and therapy using telehealth, and working with a limited number of cases. Ninety-three percent of the respondents who have used telehealth started to use it only during the pandemic. Mostly seen caseloads were pediatric speech and language disorders. Further, 96% of respondents used telehealth for counseling, 69% for rehabilitation or treatment, 63% for screening, 56% for evaluation or assessment, 48% for a referral to other professional services, and 46% for differential diagnosis. About 70% of the SLPs showed interest to continue using telehealth in the future. Several benefits were identified to using telehealth, including accessibility, cost efficiency, and the ability to engage patients with their families in therapy sessions. On the other hand, barriers to using telehealth included internet and technical issues, lack of direct communication, and difficulty controlling the therapy setting. CONCLUSIONS: The study has shown that SLPs in Saudi Arabia have experienced changes during the COVID-19 outbreak. The survey responses also indicate that the SLPs are adopting telehealth applications at an accelerated pace as a result of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Deglutition , Delivery of Health Care , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech-Language Pathology , Speech , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
12.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 307-316, 2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608038

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to describe and examine parent views of speech-language pathology (SLP) for children born with cleft palate delivered via telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom (UK). METHOD: Parents were asked whether they found this method of delivery "very effective," "somewhat effective," or "not at all effective." Free text was then invited. There were 212 responses. Ordinal chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, or Fisher's exact tests examined associations between parent views of effectiveness and biological variables and socioeconomic status. Free text responses were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and forty (66.0%) respondents reported that SLP delivered via telemedicine was "somewhat effective," 56 (26.4%) "very effective," and 16 (7.6%) "not at all effective." There was no evidence of an association between parent reported effectiveness and any of the explanatory variables. Parent-reported challenges impacting on effectiveness included technology issues and keeping their children engaged with sessions. Importantly, telemedicine was viewed as "better than nothing." CONCLUSIONS: Most parents reported that they felt SLP delivered via telemedicine during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK was at least "somewhat effective." It is important to interpret this in the context of there being no other method of service delivery during this time and that this study only represents families who were able to access SLP delivered via telemedicine. Further work is needed to identify which children with cleft palate might benefit from SLP delivered via telemedicine to inform postpandemic service provision.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cleft Palate , Speech-Language Pathology , Telemedicine , Caregivers , Child , Cleft Palate/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Parents
13.
J Voice ; 35(5): 808.e13-808.e24, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573966

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since the beginning of the new pandemic, Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) health services have had to face a new scenario. Voice therapy faces a double challenge, interventions using telepractice, and delivering rehabilitation services to a growing population of patients at risk of functional impairment related to the COVID-19 disease. Moreover, as COVID-19 is transmitted through droplets, it is critical to understand how to mitigate these risks during assessment and treatment. OBJECTIVE: To promote safety, and effective clinical practice to voice assessment and rehabilitation in the pandemic COVID-19 context for speech-language pathologists. METHODS: A group of 11 experts in voice and swallowing disorders from five different countries conducted a consensus recommendation following the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery rules building a clinical guide for speech-language pathologists during this pandemic context. RESULT: The clinical guide provides 79 recommendations for clinicians in the management of voice disorders during the pandemic and includes advice from assessment, direct treatment, telepractice, and teamwork. The consensus was reached 95% for all topics. CONCLUSION: This guideline should be taken only as recommendation; each clinician must attempt to mitigate the risk of infection and achieve the best therapeutic results taking into account the patient's particular reality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Speech-Language Pathology , Voice Disorders , Voice , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Voice Disorders/diagnosis
14.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 31(1): 303-321, 2022 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569292

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has led to sudden, widespread use of telepractice, including providing services to children who use aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). This exploratory study examined speech-language pathologists' (SLPs) experiences using telepractice to provide services to children and youth aged 3-21 years who used aided AAC during the earlier months of the pandemic (May-June 2020). METHOD: Three hundred thirty-one SLPs responded to an online survey. Closed- and open-ended survey items were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively and mixed at the point of interpretation to understand the experiences of SLPs related to the use of telepractice with children who use aided AAC, including how they perceived effectiveness. RESULTS: Most SLPs were using telepractice to provide both direct and consultation/coaching services to children who used aided AAC. There was fairly wide variation in perceptions of effectiveness of both types of services, but SLPs were more likely to rate consultation/coaching services as being more effective than direct services. SLPs identified factors impacting effectiveness across five dimensions: broader factors, practice-based factors (i.e., technology, the type of services), the child, parents and family members, and professionals. School-based SLPs perceived telepractice as being less effective than non-school-based SLPs. CONCLUSIONS: The use of telepractice during the COVID-19 pandemic has unfolded quite differently for different SLPs and the children who use aided AAC that they serve. Although AAC telepractice offers promise for the future, particularly for partnering with families, further research is needed to know how to overcome challenges experienced by SLPs. SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.17139434.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Speech-Language Pathology , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Pathologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech
15.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 290-306, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565743

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The main objective of this study was to gain insight into school-based speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') perspectives on and experiences with telepractice as a service delivery model at the onset of the COVID-19 global pandemic. A better understanding of the facilitating and challenging factors that belie telepractice-based services will guide the creation of training and resource development to further support remote speech-language services in schools. METHOD: Four focus group sessions using a semistructured format were conducted with 22 school-based SLPs from 14 states in the United States. The focus groups provided an opportunity for SLPs to reflect on their telepractice experiences, including pros and cons, necessary knowledge and skills, factors impacting telepractice service delivery, and student and family participation. Inductive thematic analysis was used to describe the collective experiences and perspectives of the participants. RESULTS: Three themes regarding telepractice emerged: technology use, locus of control for decision making, and student and family engagement. Participants reported experiencing a range of successes and challenges when attempting to meet students' needs and identified gaps in resources and school capacity for telepractice. CONCLUSIONS: The findings revealed how school SLPs experienced telepractice service delivery during the remote learning portion of the 2019-2020 school year due to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study increases our understanding of factors that facilitated and challenged the effective delivery of speech-language services via telepractice. To assist SLPs in future telepractice efforts, implications for professional development and further research are provided.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Disorders , Speech-Language Pathology , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Pathologists , Speech , United States
16.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(1): 181-192, 2022 01 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550365

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to explore how school-based speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') job satisfaction changed because of the COVID-19 global pandemic. We situated job satisfaction within the Conservation Resources (COR) theory. METHOD: We distributed a web-based survey to school-based SLPs throughout the United States. A total of 1,352 SLPs followed the link and 1,069 completed at least 90% of the survey. The survey was composed of four parts: (a) demographic information, (b) obstacles faced during COVID-19 school closures, (c) job satisfaction, and (d) self-efficacy. Self-efficacy was divided into three subscales: decision-making, instructional, and disciplinary. RESULTS: Nearly half (48%, n = 522) of the sample reported a decline in job satisfaction following COVID-19 school closures. Using a binomial logistic regression, we found that time pressures and disciplinary self-efficacy predicted this change in job satisfaction. Individuals who reported higher disciplinary self-efficacy and more pressures on their time were 1.2 times more likely to experience a decline in job satisfaction. Number of obstacles faced, caseload size, years of experience, and the additional two self-efficacy scales were not related to this change. CONCLUSIONS: Job satisfaction is considered a malleable resource within the COR theory. Indeed, we observed a change in this resource due to the rapid shift in service delivery methods, paired with variable levels of support and resources from school districts. Our results have implications for how administration may support SLPs in and out of times of acute crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Speech-Language Pathology , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pathologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Speech , Speech-Language Pathology/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
17.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 52(3): 769-775, 2021 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545676

ABSTRACT

Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated a quick shift to virtual speech-language services; however, only a small percentage of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) had previously engaged in telepractice. The purpose of this clinical tutorial is (a) to describe how the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition in Children with Hearing Loss study, a longitudinal study involving speech-language assessment with children with and without hearing loss, transitioned from in-person to virtual assessment and (b) to provide tips for optimizing virtual assessment procedures. Method We provide an overview of our decision making during the transition to virtual assessment. Additionally, we report on a pilot study that calculated test-retest reliability from in-person to virtual assessment for a subset of our preschool-age participants. Results Our pilot study revealed that most speech-language measures had high or adequate test-retest reliability when administered in a virtual environment. When low reliability occurred, generally the measures were timed. Conclusions Speech-language assessment can be conducted successfully in a virtual environment for preschool children with hearing loss. We provide suggestions for clinicians to consider when preparing for virtual assessment sessions. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14787834.


Subject(s)
Child Language , Education of Hearing Disabled , Educational Measurement/methods , Hearing Loss , Speech-Language Pathology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Educational Measurement/economics , Family , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Speech-Language Pathology/economics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/economics
18.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 30(4): 1673-1685, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545671

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study assessed and described potential clinical practice changes secondary to COVID-19 that emerged as an early response to the pandemic for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) engaged in voice, alaryngeal, and swallowing activities that may increase the risk of virus transmission. Method SLPs from the United States and Canada (n = 665) who were engaged in clinical activities that might elevate the risk of COVID-19 exposure completed an online survey regarding their clinical practices. Topics assessed included potential clinical service modifications, COVID-19 testing and health, and potential financial impacts in the early time period of the pandemic. Results The percentage of SLPs completing the most endoscopic procedures prepandemic (≥ 10/week) was reduced from 39% of respondents to 3% due to the pandemic. Those who completed the most tracheoesophageal puncture voice prosthesis changes (≥ 5/week) reported a reduction in frequency from 24% to 6%. Twenty-five percent of SLPs reported that they were tested for COVID-19, and 6% reported a positive result. Descriptive statistics suggest that COVID-19 testing rates of SLPs, the percentage of SLPs experiencing a financial impact, and the percentage who were furloughed varied across SLP work setting. Conclusions These findings provide the first data characterizing the impact on COVID-19 on clinical practice for SLPs engaged in procedures such as endoscopy and laryngectomy care. The results indicate that, as frontline workers, SLPs were directly impacted in their practice patterns, personal health, safety, and financial security, and that these reported impacts occurred differently across SLP work settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Speech-Language Pathology , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Pathologists , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
19.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 30(2): 740-747, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545668

ABSTRACT

Purpose Youth with cochlear implants (CIs) are at risk for delays in verbal short-term memory (STM)/working memory (WM), which adversely affect language, neurocognitive, and behavioral outcomes. Assessment of verbal STM/WM is critical for identifying and addressing these delays, but standard assessment procedures require face-to-face (FTF) administration. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and validity of remote testing methods (teleassessment) of verbal STM/WM in youth with CIs as a method of addressing COVID-19-related restrictions on FTF test administration. Method Tests of verbal STM/WM for nonwords, digit spans, letter-number sequences, sentences, and stories were individually administered by speech-language pathologists over a teleassessment platform to 28 youth (aged 9-22 years) with CIs and 36 same-aged normal-hearing peers. Examiners, parents, and participants completed quality and satisfaction ratings with the teleassessment procedure. Teleassessment scores were compared to results of tests obtained at FTF visits an average of 1.6 years earlier. Results Quality and satisfaction ratings for teleassessment were high and in almost all cases did not differ between the CI and normal-hearing samples. Youth with CIs scored lower than normal-hearing peers on measures of verbal STM/WM, and scores for digit span and letter-number sequencing did not differbetween teleassessment and FTF methods. Correlations across teleassessment and FTF visits were strong for digit span, letter-number sequencing, and sentence memory, but were more modest for nonword repetition. Conclusion With some caveats, teleassessment of verbal STM/WM was feasible and valid for youth with CIs.


Subject(s)
Cochlear Implants/psychology , Memory, Short-Term , Speech Perception , Speech-Language Pathology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Cochlear Implants/adverse effects , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 30(2): 532-550, 2021 03 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545666

ABSTRACT

Purpose Our aim was to critically review recent literature on the use of telehealth for dysphagia during the COVID-19 pandemic and enhance this information in order to provide evidence- and practice-based clinical guidance during and after the pandemic. Method We conducted a rapid systematized review to identify telehealth adaptations during COVID-19, according to peer-reviewed articles published from January to August 2020. Of the 40 articles identified, 11 met the inclusion criteria. Full-text reviews were completed by three raters, followed by qualitative synthesis of the results and description of practical recommendations for the use of telehealth for dysphagia. Results Seven articles were guidelines articles, three were editorials, and one was a narrative review. One article focused on telehealth and dysphagia during COVID-19. The remaining 10 mentioned telehealth in varying degrees while focusing on dysphagia management during the pandemic. No articles discussed pediatrics in depth. The most common procedure for which telehealth was recommended was the clinical swallowing assessment (8/11), followed by therapy (7/11). Six articles characterized telehealth as a second-tier service delivery option. Only one article included brief guidance on telehealth-specific factors, such as legal safeguards, safety, privacy, infrastructure, and facilitators. Conclusions Literature published during the pandemic on telehealth for dysphagia is extremely limited and guarded in endorsing telehealth as an equivalent service delivery model. We have presented prepandemic and emerging current evidence for the safety and reliability of dysphagia telemanagement, in combination with practical guidelines to facilitate the safe adoption of telehealth during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Deglutition Disorders/therapy , Speech-Language Pathology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child, Preschool , Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis , Deglutition Disorders/rehabilitation , Humans , Pandemics , Pediatrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2
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