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2.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 228, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085408

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has been mutating since it was first sequenced in early January 2020. Here, we analyze 45,494 complete SARS-CoV-2 geneome sequences in the world to understand their mutations. Among them, 12,754 sequences are from the United States. Our analysis suggests the presence of four substrains and eleven top mutations in the United States. These eleven top mutations belong to 3 disconnected groups. The first and second groups consisting of 5 and 8 concurrent mutations are prevailing, while the other group with three concurrent mutations gradually fades out. Moreover, we reveal that female immune systems are more active than those of males in responding to SARS-CoV-2 infections. One of the top mutations, 27964C > T-(S24L) on ORF8, has an unusually strong gender dependence. Based on the analysis of all mutations on the spike protein, we uncover that two of four SASR-CoV-2 substrains in the United States become potentially more infectious.


Subject(s)
/virology , Mutation/genetics , /genetics , 5' Untranslated Regions/genetics , Amino Acid Sequence , /metabolism , Evolution, Molecular , Female , Humans , Male , Models, Molecular , Nucleocapsid/metabolism , Open Reading Frames/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Protein Folding , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Thermodynamics , United States
3.
Mol Med Rep ; 23(4): 1, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083893

ABSTRACT

Recently, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) 2 (SARS­CoV­2)­causing CoV disease 2019 (COVID­19) emerged in China and has become a global pandemic. SARS­CoV­2 is a novel CoV originating from ß­CoVs. Major distinctions in the gene sequences between SARS­CoV and SARS­CoV­2 include the spike gene, open reading frame (ORF) 3b and ORF 8. SARS­CoV­2 infection is initiated when the virus interacts with angiotensin­converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors on host cells. Through this mechanism, the virus infects the alveolar, esophageal epithelial, ileum, colon and other cells on which ACE2 is highly expressed, causing damage to target organs. To date, host innate immunity may be the only identified direct factor associated with viral replication. However, increased ACE2 expression may upregulate the viral load indirectly by increasing the baseline level of infectious virus particles. The peak viral load of SARS­CoV­2 is estimated to occur ~10 days following fever onset, causing patients in the acute stage to be the primary infection source. However, patients in the recovery stage or with occult infections can also be contagious. The host immune response in patients with COVID­19 remains to be elucidated. By studying other SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses, it is hypothesized that patients with COVID­19 may lack sufficient antiviral T­cell responses, which consequently present with innate immune response disorders. This may to a certain degree explain why this type of CoV triggers severe inflammatory responses and immune damage and its associated complications.


Subject(s)
/pathology , /physiology , Adaptive Immunity , /immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , /immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Load
5.
Sci Adv ; 7(7)2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080728

ABSTRACT

Chile has one of the worst numbers worldwide in terms of SARS-CoV-2 positive cases and COVID-19-related deaths per million inhabitants; thus, characterization of neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses in the general population is critical to understanding of immunity at the local level. Given our inability to perform massive classical neutralization assays due to the scarce availability of BSL-3 facilities in the country, we developed and fully characterized an HIV-based SARS-CoV-2 pseudotype, which was used in a 96-well plate format to investigate NAb responses in samples from individuals exposed to SARS-CoV-2 or treated with convalescent plasma. We also identified samples with decreased or enhanced neutralization activity against the D614G spike variant compared with the wild type, indicating the relevance of this variant in host immunity. The data presented here represent the first insights into NAb responses in individuals from Chile, serving as a guide for future studies in the country.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Mutation, Missense , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Amino Acid Substitution , Animals , /genetics , Chile , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Male , /metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vero Cells
6.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(2): e1009165, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079380

ABSTRACT

The interactions between antibodies, SARS-CoV-2 and immune cells contribute to the pathogenesis of COVID-19 and protective immunity. To understand the differences between antibody responses in mild versus severe cases of COVID-19, we analyzed the B cell responses in patients 1.5 months post SARS-CoV-2 infection. Severe, and not mild, infection correlated with high titers of IgG against Spike receptor binding domain (RBD) that were capable of ACE2:RBD inhibition. B cell receptor (BCR) sequencing revealed that VH3-53 was enriched during severe infection. Of the 22 antibodies cloned from two severe donors, six exhibited potent neutralization against authentic SARS-CoV-2, and inhibited syncytia formation. Using peptide libraries, competition ELISA and mutagenesis of RBD, we mapped the epitopes of the neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to three different sites on the Spike. Finally, we used combinations of nAbs targeting different immune-sites to efficiently block SARS-CoV-2 infection. Analysis of 49 healthy BCR repertoires revealed that the nAbs germline VHJH precursors comprise up to 2.7% of all VHJHs. We demonstrate that severe COVID-19 is associated with unique BCR signatures and multi-clonal neutralizing responses that are relatively frequent in the population. Moreover, our data support the use of combination antibody therapy to prevent and treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Convalescence , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Adult , Aged , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , /immunology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cloning, Molecular , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vero Cells
7.
mSphere ; 6(1)2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079035

ABSTRACT

Compared to other human coronaviruses, the genetic diversity and evolution of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) are relatively understudied. We report a fatal case of COVID-19 pneumonia coinfected with HCoV-229E in Hong Kong. Genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-229E from a nasopharyngeal sample of the patient showed that the SARS-CoV-2 strain HK13 was most closely related to SARS-CoV-2 type strain Wuhan-Hu-1 (99.99% nucleotide identity), compatible with his recent history of travel to Wuhan. The HCoV-229E strain HK20-42 was most closely related to HCoV-229E strain SC0865 from the United States (99.86% nucleotide identity). To investigate if it may represent a newly emerged HCoV-229E genotype in Hong Kong, we retrieved 41 archived respiratory samples that tested positive for HCoV-229E from 2004 to 2019. Pneumonia and exacerbations of chronic airway diseases were common among infected patients. Complete RdRp, S, and N gene sequencing of the 41 HCoV-229E strains revealed that our contemporary HCoV-229E strains have undergone significant genetic drift with clustering of strains in chronological order. Two novel genogroups were identified, in addition to previously described genogroups 1 to 4, with recent circulating strains including strain HK20-42 belonging to novel genogroup 6. Positive selection was detected in the spike protein and receptor-binding domain, which may be important for viral evolution at the receptor-binding interphase. Molecular dating analysis showed that HCoV-229E shared the most recent common ancestor with bat and camel/alpaca 229E-related viruses at ∼1884, while camel/alpaca viruses had a relatively recent common ancestor at ∼1999. Further studies are required to ascertain the evolutionary origin and path of HCoV-229E.IMPORTANCE Since its first appearance in the 1960s, the genetic diversity and evolution of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) have been relatively understudied. In this study, we report a fatal case of COVID-19 coinfected with HCoV-229E in Hong Kong. Genome sequencing revealed that our SARS-CoV-2 strain is highly identical to the SARS-CoV-2 strain from Wuhan, compatible with the patient's recent travel history, whereas our HCoV-229E strain in this study is highly identical to a recent strain in the United States. We also retrieved 41 archived HCoV-229E strains from 2004 to 2019 in Hong Kong for sequence analysis. Pneumonia and exacerbations of chronic airway diseases were common diagnoses among the 41 patients. The results showed that HCoV-229E was evolving in chronological order. Two novel genogroups were identified in addition to the four preexisting HCoV-229E genogroups, with recent circulating strains belonging to novel genogroup 6. Molecular clock analysis dated bat-to-human and bat-to-camelid transmission to as early as 1884.


Subject(s)
/pathology , Common Cold/pathology , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Genetic Variation/genetics , /genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Base Sequence , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Hong Kong , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Protein Domains/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Young Adult
8.
Gene ; 771: 145368, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077902

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become an immense threat to global public health. In this study, we performed complete genome sequencing of a SARS-CoV-2 isolate. More than 67,000 genome sequences were further inspected from Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID). Using several in silico techniques, we proposed prospective therapeutics against this virus. Through meticulous analysis, several conserved and therapeutically suitable regions of SARS-CoV-2 such as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), Spike (S) and Membrane glycoprotein (M) coding genes were selected. Both S and M were chosen for the development of a chimeric vaccine that can generate memory B and T cells. siRNAs were also designed for S and M gene silencing. Moreover, six new drug candidates were suggested that might inhibit the activity of RdRp. Since SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV-1 have 82.30% sequence identity, a Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) dataset of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) patients were analyzed. In this analysis, 13 immunoregulatory genes were found that can be used to develop type 1 interferon (IFN) based therapy. The proposed vaccine, siRNAs, drugs and IFN based analysis of this study will accelerate the development of new treatments.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Whole Genome Sequencing/methods , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Computer Simulation , Conserved Sequence , Drug Design , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/drug effects , Humans , Interferons/pharmacology , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , /classification , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
9.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(6): e54, 2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073332

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which started at the end of 2019 and has spread worldwide, has remained unabated in 2021. Since non-pharmaceutical interventions including social distancing are facing limitations in controlling COVID-19, additional absolute means to change the trend are necessary. To this end, coronavirus-specific antiviral drugs and vaccines are urgently needed, but for now, the priority is to promote herd immunity through extensive nationwide vaccination campaign. In addition to the vaccines based on the conventional technology such inactivated or killed virus or protein subunit vaccines, several vaccines on the new technological platforms, for example, nucleic acids-based vaccines delivered by viral carriers, nanoparticles, or plasmids as a medium were introduced in this pandemic. In addition to achieving sufficient herd immunity with vaccination, the development of antiviral treatments that work specifically against COVID-19 will also be necessary to terminate the epidemic completely.


Subject(s)
/immunology , /prevention & control , Adenoviridae/genetics , /virology , Genetic Variation , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Herd , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/immunology , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , /isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3318, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069119

ABSTRACT

Despite unprecedented global efforts to rapidly develop SARS-CoV-2 treatments, in order to reduce the burden placed on health systems, the situation remains critical. Effective diagnosis, treatment, and prophylactic measures are urgently required to meet global demand: recombinant antibodies fulfill these requirements and have marked clinical potential. Here, we describe the fast-tracked development of an alpaca Nanobody specific for the receptor-binding-domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein with potential therapeutic applicability. We present a rapid method for nanobody isolation that includes an optimized immunization regimen coupled with VHH library E. coli surface display, which allows single-step selection of Nanobodies using a simple density gradient centrifugation of the bacterial library. The selected single and monomeric Nanobody, W25, binds to the SARS-CoV-2 S RBD with sub-nanomolar affinity and efficiently competes with ACE-2 receptor binding. Furthermore, W25 potently neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 wild type and the D614G variant with IC50 values in the nanomolar range, demonstrating its potential as antiviral agent.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Affinity/genetics , /immunology , Single-Domain Antibodies/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , /immunology , Animals , Camelids, New World/immunology , Escherichia coli/genetics , Escherichia coli/metabolism , Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics , HeLa Cells , Humans , Immunization , Male , Neutralization Tests , Peptide Library , Protein Binding/genetics , /isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Transfection
11.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 848, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069106

ABSTRACT

The causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2, is steadily mutating during continuous transmission among humans. Such mutations can occur in the spike (S) protein that binds to the ACE2 receptor and is cleaved by TMPRSS2. However, whether S mutations affect SARS-CoV-2 cell entry remains unknown. Here, we show that naturally occurring S mutations can reduce or enhance cell entry via ACE2 and TMPRSS2. A SARS-CoV-2 S-pseudotyped lentivirus exhibits substantially lower entry than that of SARS-CoV S. Among S variants, the D614G mutant shows the highest cell entry, as supported by structural and binding analyses. Nevertheless, the D614G mutation does not affect neutralization by antisera against prototypic viruses. Taken together, we conclude that the D614G mutation increases cell entry by acquiring higher affinity to ACE2 while maintaining neutralization susceptibility. Based on these findings, further worldwide surveillance is required to understand SARS-CoV-2 transmissibility among humans.


Subject(s)
/metabolism , Mutation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virus Internalization , Binding, Competitive , /virology , Humans , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
12.
J Immunol Methods ; 490: 112952, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065340

ABSTRACT

The ability to quantify protein-ligand interactions in an accurate and high-throughput manner is important in diverse areas of biology and medicine. Multiplex bead binding assays (MBBAs) are powerful methods that allow for simultaneous analysis of many protein-ligand interactions. Although there are a number of well-established MBBA platforms, there are few platforms suitable for research and development that offer rapid experimentation at low costs and without the need for specialized reagents or instruments dedicated for MBBA. Here, we describe a MBBA method that uses low-cost reagents and standard cytometers. The key innovation is the use of the essentially irreversible biotin-streptavidin interaction. We prepared a biotin-conjugated fluorescent dye and used it to produce streptavidin-coated magnetic beads that are labeled at distinct levels of fluorescence. We show the utility of our method in characterization of phage-displayed antibodies against multiple antigens of SARS-CoV-2, which substantially improves the throughput and dramatically reduces antigen consumption compared with conventional phage ELISA methods. This approach will make MBBAs more broadly accessible.


Subject(s)
/methods , /metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Bacterial Proteins/metabolism , Biotin/analogs & derivatives , Biotin/metabolism , Cell Surface Display Techniques , Flow Cytometry , Fluorescent Dyes , HEK293 Cells , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Immunomagnetic Separation , Microspheres , Mutation/genetics , Protein Binding , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
13.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 19(5): 456-470, 2020 Oct 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068112

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus, known as "SARS-CoV-2"; is the cause of one of the most prevalent infectious viral diseases that was recently announced pandemic by the world health organization. Ongoing research in the fields of prevention, management, and therapy establishes a functional scaffold for clinics during the time of crisis. To obtain this goal, it is necessary that all pathophysiologic aspects of COVID-19 from infection to predisposing backgrounds of infection be identified, so that all the ambiguities of researchers regarding transmission mechanisms, variable clinical manifestation, and therapeutic response can be solved. Here, we firstly discuss about the homology screening between nCoV-2019 and beta-coronavirus family using phylogenetic analyses. Secondly, we analyzed the viral motifs to show that viral entry into the host cells requires a primary activation step performed by FURIN and FURIN-like-mediated enzymatic cleavage on the structural glycoprotein. The cleavage increases viral performance by 1000 folds. We then present a comprehensive view on host cells and the significance of gene variants affecting activation enzymes, supportive entry, and spread mechanisms in humans including renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) a pathway results in certain phenotypes or exacerbate infection-related phenotypes in different organs, hence causes variable clinical manifestations. This is followed by discussing about the importance of personalized medicine in nCoV-2019 exposure. Moreover, chemical drugs prescribed for individuals affected with COVID-19, as well as genes involved in drug transport and metabolisms are reviewed as a prelude to drug response. Finally, we suggest some therapeutic approaches developed based on new methods and technology such as anti-sense therapy and antibodies.


Subject(s)
/genetics , Furin/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , ADAM17 Protein/genetics , ADAM17 Protein/metabolism , Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/genetics , /physiopathology , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Furin/metabolism , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genome, Human , Genome, Viral , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Phylogeny , Precision Medicine , /metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization
14.
Viruses ; 13(1)2021 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067776

ABSTRACT

The spike protein in SARS-CoV-2 (SARS-2-S) interacts with the human ACE2 receptor to gain entry into a cell to initiate infection. Both Pfizer/BioNTech's BNT162b2 and Moderna's mRNA-1273 vaccine candidates are based on stabilized mRNA encoding prefusion SARS-2-S that can be produced after the mRNA is delivered into the human cell and translated. SARS-2-S is cleaved into S1 and S2 subunits, with S1 serving the function of receptor-binding and S2 serving the function of membrane fusion. Here, I dissect in detail the various domains of SARS-2-S and their functions discovered through a variety of different experimental and theoretical approaches to build a foundation for a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of how SARS-2-S works to achieve its function of mediating cell entry and subsequent cell-to-cell transmission. The integration of structure and function of SARS-2-S in this review should enhance our understanding of the dynamic processes involving receptor binding, multiple cleavage events, membrane fusion, viral entry, as well as the emergence of new viral variants. I highlighted the relevance of structural domains and dynamics to vaccine development, and discussed reasons for the spike protein to be frequently featured in the conspiracy theory claiming that SARS-CoV-2 is artificially created.


Subject(s)
/virology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , /prevention & control , /immunology , Humans , Membrane Fusion , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Protein Stability , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , /immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virus Internalization
15.
Euro Surveill ; 26(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067621

ABSTRACT

Two new SARS-CoV-2 lineages with the N501Y mutation in the receptor-binding domain of the spike protein spread rapidly in the United Kingdom. We estimated that the earlier 501Y lineage without amino acid deletion Δ69/Δ70, circulating mainly between early September and mid-November, was 10% (6-13%) more transmissible than the 501N lineage, and the 501Y lineage with amino acid deletion Δ69/Δ70, circulating since late September, was 75% (70-80%) more transmissible than the 501N lineage.


Subject(s)
/transmission , Mutation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , /diagnosis , Genetic Markers , Genetic Variation , Genome, Viral , Humans , Phylogeny , United Kingdom/epidemiology
16.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245584, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067420

ABSTRACT

The COVID19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus has severely affected most countries of the world including Bangladesh. We conducted comparative analysis of publicly available whole-genome sequences of 64 SARS-CoV-2 isolates in Bangladesh and 371 isolates from another 27 countries to predict possible transmission routes of COVID19 to Bangladesh and genomic variations among the viruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the pathogen was imported in Bangladesh from multiple countries. The viruses found in the southern district of Chattogram were closely related to strains from Saudi Arabia whereas those in Dhaka were similar to that of United Kingdom and France. The 64 SARS-CoV-2 sequences from Bangladesh belonged to three clusters. Compared to the ancestral SARS-CoV-2 sequence reported from China, the isolates in Bangladesh had a total of 180 mutations in the coding region of the genome, and 110 of these were missense. Among these, 99 missense mutations (90%) were predicted to destabilize protein structures. Remarkably, a mutation that leads to an I300F change in the nsp2 protein and a mutation leading to D614G change in the spike protein were prevalent in SARS-CoV-2 genomic sequences, and might have influenced the epidemiological properties of the virus in Bangladesh.


Subject(s)
/virology , Whole Genome Sequencing , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Bangladesh , Computer Simulation , Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors/genetics , Humans , Phylogeny , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
17.
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob ; 20(1): 8, 2021 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067240

ABSTRACT

The Severe Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has gained research attention worldwide, given the current pandemic. Nevertheless, a previous zoonotic and highly pathogenic coronavirus, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), is still causing concern, especially in Saudi Arabia and neighbour countries. The MERS-CoV has been reported from respiratory samples in more than 27 countries, and around 2500 cases have been reported with an approximate fatality rate of 35%. After its emergence in 2012 intermittent, sporadic cases, nosocomial infections and many community clusters of MERS continued to occur in many countries. Human-to-human transmission resulted in the large outbreaks in Saudi Arabia. The inherent genetic variability among various clads of the MERS-CoV might have probably paved the events of cross-species transmission along with changes in the inter-species and intra-species tropism. The current review is drafted using an extensive review of literature on various databases, selecting of publications irrespective of favouring or opposing, assessing the merit of study, the abstraction of data and analysing data. The genome of MERS-CoV contains around thirty thousand nucleotides having seven predicted open reading frames. Spike (S), envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N) proteins are the four main structural proteins. The surface located spike protein (S) of betacoronaviruses has been established to be one of the significant factors in their zoonotic transmission through virus-receptor recognition mediation and subsequent initiation of viral infection. Three regions in Saudi Arabia (KSA), Eastern Province, Riyadh and Makkah were affected severely. The epidemic progression had been the highest in 2014 in Makkah and Riyadh and Eastern Province in 2013. With a lurking epidemic scare, there is a crucial need for effective therapeutic and immunological remedies constructed on sound molecular investigations.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , /genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , /genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral/genetics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3187, 2021 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065963

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) is a novel coronavirus causing the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. High adaptive plasticity on the spike protein of SASR-CoV-2 enables it to transmit across different host species. In the present study, we collected 2092 high-quality genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 from 160 regions in over 50 countries and reconstructed their phylogeny. We also analyzed the polymorphic interaction between spike protein and human ACE2 (hACE2). Phylogenetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 suggests that SARS-CoV-2 is probably originated from a recombination event on the spike protein between a bat coronavirus and a pangolin coronavirus that endows it humans infectivity. Compared with other regions in the S gene of SARS-CoV-2, the direct-binding sites of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) is more conserved. We focused on 3,860 amino acid mutations in spike protein RBD (T333-C525) of SARS-CoV-2 and simulated their differential stability and binding affinity to hACE2 (S19-D615). The results indicate no preference for SARS-CoV-2 infectivity on people of different ethnic groups. The variants in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 may also be a good indicator demonstrating the transmission route of SARS-CoV-2 from its natural reservoir to human hosts.


Subject(s)
/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Animals , Binding Sites , Humans , Mutation , Polymorphism, Genetic , Protein Binding , /genetics
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3238, 2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065946

ABSTRACT

The rampant spread of COVID-19, an infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, all over the world has led to over millions of deaths, and devastated the social, financial and political entities around the world. Without an existing effective medical therapy, vaccines are urgently needed to avoid the spread of this disease. In this study, we propose an in silico deep learning approach for prediction and design of a multi-epitope vaccine (DeepVacPred). By combining the in silico immunoinformatics and deep neural network strategies, the DeepVacPred computational framework directly predicts 26 potential vaccine subunits from the available SARS-CoV-2 spike protein sequence. We further use in silico methods to investigate the linear B-cell epitopes, Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL) epitopes, Helper T Lymphocytes (HTL) epitopes in the 26 subunit candidates and identify the best 11 of them to construct a multi-epitope vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 virus. The human population coverage, antigenicity, allergenicity, toxicity, physicochemical properties and secondary structure of the designed vaccine are evaluated via state-of-the-art bioinformatic approaches, showing good quality of the designed vaccine. The 3D structure of the designed vaccine is predicted, refined and validated by in silico tools. Finally, we optimize and insert the codon sequence into a plasmid to ensure the cloning and expression efficiency. In conclusion, this proposed artificial intelligence (AI) based vaccine discovery framework accelerates the vaccine design process and constructs a 694aa multi-epitope vaccine containing 16 B-cell epitopes, 82 CTL epitopes and 89 HTL epitopes, which is promising to fight the SARS-CoV-2 viral infection and can be further evaluated in clinical studies. Moreover, we trace the RNA mutations of the SARS-CoV-2 and ensure that the designed vaccine can tackle the recent RNA mutations of the virus.


Subject(s)
Deep Learning , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Allergens , /adverse effects , /immunology , Codon Usage , Computational Biology , Drug Design , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Models, Molecular , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Mutation , Protein Conformation , RNA, Viral , /genetics , Solubility , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/chemistry , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology
20.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 837, 2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065863

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses of bats and pangolins have been implicated in the origin and evolution of the pandemic SARS-CoV-2. We show that spikes from Guangdong Pangolin-CoVs, closely related to SARS-CoV-2, bind strongly to human and pangolin ACE2 receptors. We also report the cryo-EM structure of a Pangolin-CoV spike protein and show it adopts a fully-closed conformation and that, aside from the Receptor-Binding Domain, it resembles the spike of a bat coronavirus RaTG13 more than that of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Evolution, Molecular , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , /metabolism , Animals , Binding, Competitive , /virology , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , Models, Molecular , Pandemics , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , /physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
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