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1.
Curr Opin Neurol ; 35(6): 728-740, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063142

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Spasticity is a common sequela of brain and spinal cord injury and contributes to disability, reduces quality of life, and increases economic burden. Spasticity is still incompletely recognized and undertreated. We will provide an overview of recent published data on the definition, assessment, and prediction, therapeutic advances, with a focus on promising new approaches, and telemedicine applications for spasticity. RECENT FINDINGS: Two new definitions of spasticity have been recently proposed, but operational criteria should be developed, and test-retest and inter-rater reliability should be explored. Cannabinoids proved to be effective in spasticity in multiple sclerosis, but evidence in other types of spasticity is lacking. Botulinum neurotoxin injection is the first-line therapy for focal spasticity, and recent literature focused on optimizing its efficacy. Several pharmacological, interventional, and nonpharmacological therapeutic approaches for spasticity have been explored but low-quality evidence impedes solid conclusions on their efficacy. The recent COVID-19 pandemic yielded guidelines/recommendations for the use of telemedicine in spasticity. SUMMARY: Despite the frequency of spasticity, robust diagnostic criteria and reliable assessment scales are required. High-quality studies are needed to support the efficacy of current treatments for spasticity. Future studies should explore telemedicine tools for spasticity assessment and treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Humans , Quality of Life , Reproducibility of Results , Pandemics , COVID-19/complications , Muscle Spasticity/diagnosis , Muscle Spasticity/etiology , Muscle Spasticity/therapy , Spinal Cord Injuries/complications , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy , Brain
2.
Spinal Cord Ser Cases ; 8(1): 83, 2022 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062191

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. OBJECTIVES: The primary outcome of the study was to identify patient characteristics associated with a positive COVID-19 test. The secondary outcome was to identify patient characteristics associated with mortality from COVID-19. SETTING: Veterans Health Administration (VHA) National Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders (SCI) Registry, created by the National Spinal Cord Injury and Disorders SCI Program Office in March 2020. METHODS: Data was analyzed in the form of descriptive statistics and then subsequent regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: A total of 4,562 persons with SCI were tested for COVID-19 between March and July 2020, and 290 were positive. The study found that African Americans had increased odds of testing positive for COVID-19 (OR 1.53 (1.18-2.00), p < 0.01). Increased age correlated with increased odds of mortality after testing positive for COVID-19 (1.046 (1.003-1.090)). Non-smokers had lower odds of mortality following positive COVID-19 test (0.15 (0.04-0.52)). No association was found between neurologic level of injury (NLI) and positive COVID-19 test or increased mortality. Increased Body Mass Index (BMI) did correlate with positive COVID-19 test but not increased mortality. The case fatality rate for persons with SCI and a positive test for COVID-19 was 12%. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to define the risk factors for patients with SCI to elucidate and mitigate individual and population risks. These risk factors also can play a role in determining the allocation of critical healthcare resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Veterans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Cord Injuries/complications
3.
J Spinal Cord Med ; 45(5): 765-768, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050940

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), acute cerebellitis and transverse myelitis are rare complications of COVID-19 infection separately. The combination of these three, however, has not yet been reported. FINDINGS: We present an atypical case (42-year-old man) that developed acute ascending flaccid paraparesis, ataxia and urinary retention two weeks after COVID-19 infection. Neurological examination revealed distal and proximal weakness (4/5) on lower extremities, decreased tendon reflexes, sixth cranial nerve palsy and dysmetria without sensory disturbance. His cranial MRI showed cerebellitis whereas the spinal MRI showed transverse myelitis at the T11/12 level. Albuminocytologic dissociation was present in the cerebrospinal fluid. The nerve conduction study was concordant with early findings of GBS. He recovered well after corticosteroid treatment without needing any immunotherapy. On day seven of hospitalization, the modified Rankin Scale score was 0. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 infection may present with a combination of neurological manifestations such as cerebellitis, transverse myelitis and GBS. This patient presented significant functional recovery after treatment with corticosteroid without immunotherapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Myelitis, Transverse , Spinal Cord Injuries , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Myelitis, Transverse/etiology
4.
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult ; 99(4): 51-56, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994661

ABSTRACT

After suffering a new coronavirus infection (COVID-19), patients develop damage to various organs and systems, including the central nervous system. One of the rare and little-described complications is spinal cord injury. PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: Description of a clinical case of post-infectious myelopathy in a young patient after a new coronavirus infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient L., 28 years old, was admitted for rehabilitation treatment at the Regional Medical and Rehabilitation Center with a diagnosis of post-infectious myelopathy, acute period, lower central paraplegia. The patient underwent a comprehensive clinical and instrumental monitoring, including an assessment of the anamnesis, complaints, physical condition, and neurological status. The dynamics of the patient's condition was assessed using the rehabilitation routing scale, as well as the Rivermead mobility index, functional categories of walking, the Hauser walking index, the Berg balance scale, and the Frenchay hand test. RESULTS: After completion of the rehabilitation course, the patient showed positive dynamics in the form of an increase in exercise tolerance up to 40 minutes; increase in strength and volume of active movements in the lower extremities. Positive dynamics was revealed on all scales assessed. CONCLUSION: Due to the fact that the number of complications of COVID-19 is growing, it is necessary to inform doctors about the possibility of such a complication as myelopathy in order to timely diagnosis and effective treatment, which will reduce the incidence associated with spinal cord dysfunction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Physical Therapy Modalities , Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation , Treatment Outcome , Walking/physiology
5.
Spinal Cord ; 60(11): 984-989, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1947284

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: A qualitative study using focus group discussion. OBJECTIVE: To explore the impacts of COVID-19 on multiple aspects of the lives of individuals living with spinal cord injury (SCI) in Nepal. SETTING: Community settings in Nepal. METHODS: A qualitative phenomenological study was conducted using two virtual focus group discussions. Fourteen individuals with SCI residing in different parts of Nepal participated. A thematic analysis approach was used to analyze and interpret the participants' responses. RESULTS: The four key themes for the impacts of COVID-19 on individuals with SCI were: (1) physical health with subthemes of (a) difficulty due to the presence of COVID-19 symptoms and (b) deterioration in secondary conditions; (2) mental health with subthemes of (c) constant fear of COVID-19 and (d) psychological distress; (3) social life with subthemes of (e) social stigma and (f) social isolation, and (4) economic problems with subthemes of (g) financial burden and (i) inadequate resources. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has tremendously impacted the physical, mental, social, and economic aspects of the lives of individuals with SCI. These, in turn, could impede the functioning and well-being of this population. The utilization of telehealth to provide education, psychosocial support, social awareness programs, and the provision of essential medical supplies appear necessary to maintain and improve the well-being of individuals with SCI during this pandemic. Future studies using an in-depth interview approach and psychosocial interventions are recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Humans , Pandemics , Spinal Cord Injuries/complications , Spinal Cord Injuries/epidemiology , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nepal/epidemiology , Qualitative Research
6.
BMJ Open ; 12(6): e059534, 2022 06 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891838

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 has led to rapid changes in rehabilitation service provision for young people living with traumatic brain and/or spinal cord injury. The aim of this project was to understand the experiences of rehabilitation service providers during the acute response stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, we aimed to identify innovative approaches to meeting the ongoing needs of young people with traumatic brain and/or spinal cord injury during this time. SETTING: This study was conducted at a research institute and involved remote interviews with key informants around Australia and internationally. PARTICIPANTS: Key informants from 11 services supporting children and/or adolescents with traumatic brain injury and/or spinal cord injury were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three key themes emerged: (1) recognising and responding to the experiences of families during the pandemic, (2) the impact of greater use of telehealth on care delivery, and (3) realising opportunities to enhance family-centred care. CONCLUSIONS: These themes capture shifting perspectives and process changes relevant to longer term practice. Research findings suggest opportunities for future service development, enabling service delivery that is more family centred, flexible and efficient in meeting the needs of families. Understanding these experiences and the changed nature of service delivery provides important insights with implications for future service improvement.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic , COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Adolescent , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/therapy , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation
7.
Ir Med J ; 115(4): 583, 2022 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1887627

ABSTRACT

Aim To investigate the impact of the first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic on the care of patients with newly acquired traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in Ireland Methods A prospective audit of patients with newly acquired TSCI from 1st March to 30th June 2020 was undertaken. Cases were drawn from referrals received through the National Spinal Injuries Unit (NSIU) and neurosciences centres. The standard of care guidelines used were from National Health Service (NHS) England standards, the Irish Integrated Care Pathway and British Association of Spinal cord Injury Specialist (BASCIS) COVID-19 guidelines. Results Nineteen patients sustained a TSCI during the study period. Thirteen patients (68%) were treated in the NSIU, eleven of whom were subsequently repatriated to non-specialist centres. Twelve patients (63%) waited an average of 113.8 ± 33.4 days for admission to specialist in-patient rehabilitation. Nine patients (75%) had developed at least one secondary complication by the time of admission. Conclusion With the exception of waiting time for specialist in-patient rehabilitation, delivery of TSCI care during this period was similar to the care previously recorded. Shortcomings in service provision are long-standing and highlight the need for timely implementation of an integrated trauma network for Ireland.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Spinal Injuries , Humans , Pandemics , Spinal Cord Injuries/epidemiology , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy , Spinal Injuries/complications , State Medicine , Subacute Care
8.
Spinal Cord ; 60(10): 875-881, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815518

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional design. OBJECTIVES: To investigate rater reliability of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure or SCIM III among rehabilitation professionals, along with the concurrent validity of the tool as compared to standard measures covering wheelchair users (WU) and ambulatory (AM) individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: A tertiary rehabilitation center and communities. METHODS: Eighty-two participants with SCI (39 WU and 43 AM individuals) were assessed using SCIM III items. The data of first 30 participants were video recorded for rater reliability assessments by seven rehabilitation professionals, including nurses, occupational therapists, and physical therapists (one novice and one experienced rater for each professional). All participants were also assessed using standard measures to verify concurrent validity of SCIM III by an experienced rater. RESULTS: The SCIM III showed excellent intra-rater and inter-rater reliability among rehabilitation professionals when analyzed for overall items (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) >0.90) and separately for each subscale (kappa values >0.80). The total SCIM III of WU and the mobility scores of AM participants showed significant correlation with standard measures for muscle strength, limit of stability, balance control, functional endurance, and walking ability (rs = 0.343-0.779; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The present findings extend clinical benefit and confirm the use of SCIM III interchangeably among rehabilitation professionals after they have been adequately trained. The findings are important for community-based rehabilitation and home healthcare services, especially during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, when hospital beds and in-patient services are limited for individuals with SCI.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the greatest challenges faced by people following a spinal cord injury is reintegrating into the community. Peer mentors are people who have had shared experiences of disadvantage and distress and have successfully navigated their way through the associated challenges to lead meaningful lives. Historically, peer mentoring services have been predominantly delivered via face-to-face interactions. Little is known about the experience of people with spinal cord injury engaging in online peer support services, and what the challenges and benefits are of this mode of delivery. METHODS: An anonymous online survey consisting of closed and open response questions was used to collect data. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively and qualitative data were analysed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: Positive benefits of engaging in peer support via videoconferencing included convenience and social connectedness. The main barriers were problems with Wi-Fi and internet connections, inconsistencies between platforms and having to learn new platforms. Even though responses were mixed when comparing videoconferencing to face-to-face peer support, most participants felt socially connected. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing barriers through the provision of appropriate technology, and targeted and individualised assistance, is important to facilitate uptake of online peer support for people with spinal cord injury.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Spinal Cord Injuries , Humans , Mentors , Peer Group , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy , Videoconferencing
10.
Top Spinal Cord Inj Rehabil ; 28(2): 185-195, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1786626

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by increased rates of depression and social isolation. However, we do not yet understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the psychosocial health of people with spinal cord injury (PwSCI), a population that is already at risk of experiencing mental health conditions. Objectives: The aims of the study were to (1) examine the impact of the pandemic on the psychosocial health of PwSCI and (2) investigate the experiences of PwSCI and resources they reported needing during the peak of the pandemic. Methods: A cross-sectional survey with closed- and open-ended questions was administered to 51 PwSCI. Participants were included if they had an SCI, were 18 years or older, lived in St. Louis, Missouri, and surrounding areas, and understood English. Results: Canonical correlation showed a significant association between financial security, food insecurity, and personal assistance service use and adverse psychosocial health outcomes (p < .001). Participants reported interest in resources related to COVID-19 precautions for wheelchair users as well as home exercise programming and financial assistance with utilities. Finally, qualitative analysis revealed four major themes: (1) mental health during the pandemic, (2) financial concerns and reduced access to personal assistance services, (3) feelings of social isolation prior to the pandemic, and (4) local and national authorities' handling of the pandemic. Conclusion: PwSCI are impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and reported a variety of resource needs. These findings may inform service providers, support systems, and organizations to better support PwSCI during times of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Cord Injuries/complications , Spinal Cord Injuries/epidemiology
11.
Cells ; 11(8)2022 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785540

ABSTRACT

The risk of complications following surgical procedures is significantly increased in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, the mechanisms underlying these correlations are not fully known. Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients who underwent reconstructive surgery for pressure ulcers (PUs) before and during the COVID-19 pandemic were included in this study. The patient's postoperative progression was registered, and the subcutaneous white adipose tissue (s-WAT) surrounding the ulcers was analyzed by proteomic and immunohistochemical assays to identify the molecular/cellular signatures of impaired recovery. Patients with SCI and a COVID-19-positive diagnosis showed worse recovery and severe postoperative complications, requiring reintervention. Several proteins were upregulated in the adipose tissue of these patients. Among them, CKMT2 and CKM stood out, and CKM increased for up to 60 days after the COVID-19 diagnosis. Moreover, CKMT2 and CKM were largely found in MGCs within the s-WAT of COVID patients. Some of these proteins presented post-translational modifications and were targeted by autoantibodies in the serum of COVID patients. Overall, our results indicate that CKMT2, CKM, and the presence of MGCs in the adipose tissue surrounding PUs in post-COVID patients could be predictive biomarkers of postsurgical complications. These results suggest that the inflammatory response in adipose tissue may underlie the defective repair seen after surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pressure Ulcer , Spinal Cord Injuries , Adipose Tissue/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing , Creatine Kinase/metabolism , Creatine Kinase, Mitochondrial Form/metabolism , Humans , Pandemics , Pressure Ulcer/epidemiology , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Pressure Ulcer/surgery , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Cord Injuries/complications , Spinal Cord Injuries/surgery , Suppuration/complications , Up-Regulation
12.
Disabil Health J ; 15(3): 101326, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Manual wheelchair users are at high risk of developing shoulder pain. However, it is not known if restrictions to limit the spread of the COVID-19 virus affected physical activity, wheelchair use and shoulder pain. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study is to determine whether COVID-19 related restrictions caused changes in physical activity levels and the presence of shoulder pain in persons who use a wheelchair. METHODS: Manual wheelchair users completed a survey about the presence and severity of shoulder pain in a cross-sectional study design. Participants completed the Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire and were asked about daily wheelchair activity before and during lockdown. A logistic regression examined the relationship between increase in shoulder pain severity and change in activity levels. RESULTS: Sixty respondents were included for analysis. There was no significant change in physical activity during lockdown. There was a significant reduction in number of hours of daily wheelchair use and number of chair transfers during lockdown. Of the respondents, 67% reported having shoulder pain and 22% reported their shoulder pain becoming more severe during lockdown. No significant relationship was observed between the change in activity levels and increasing severity of shoulder pain. CONCLUSION: Restrictions to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus resulted in no changes in physical activity levels in a sample of adult manual wheelchair users; however, there was a reduced time using a wheelchair each day and fewer chair transfers. The changes in wheelchair activities were not related to the worsening of shoulder pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Spinal Cord Injuries , Wheelchairs , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , Shoulder Pain/etiology , Spinal Cord Injuries/complications , Wheelchairs/adverse effects
13.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265807, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759962

ABSTRACT

Lifestyle physical activity following spinal cord injury (SCI) is critical for functional independence, mental wellness, and social participation, yet nearly 50% of individuals with SCI report no regular exercise. The objective of this study was to better understand factors leading to this participation gap by capturing the physical activity perspectives of individuals living with SCI. We completed small group interviews with nine individuals living with SCI across the United States. Iterative thematic analysis systematically revealed meaningful core concepts related to physical activity engagement with SCI. Emergent themes revealed challenges to lifestyle physical activity behavior including gaps in physical activity education, isolation during psychological adjustment, and knowledge limitations in community exercise settings. A secondary theme related to the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, highlighting additional environmental constraints affecting participation. Our findings suggest that most physical activity education is delivered during inpatient rehabilitation and is related to physical function. Lifetime physical activity strategies are achieved through self-education and peer networking. Personal motivators for physical activity include secondary condition prevention, while social and emotional barriers prevent regular adherence. These findings can inform the development and delivery of physical activity programs to maximize physical activity engagement in individuals living with chronic SCI.


Subject(s)
Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation , Adult , Aged , Attitude to Health , Emotional Adjustment , Exercise/physiology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Spinal Cord Injuries/psychology , Spinal Cord Injuries/therapy
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715315

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was the evaluation of the hormonal response of wheelchair rugby participants under the half-year training cycle. The study sample included 11 members of the Polish national wheelchair rugby team with spinal cord injury at the cervical level, ranging in age from 21 to 41 years, body weight (72.2 ± 11.53 kg), and body height (182.3 ± 6.11 cm). The disabled individuals with spinal cord injury subjected to the study constitute a homogeneous group in terms of age, body height, weight, and injury level. The study was carried out at the beginning and at the end of a 6-month training period. In the first and second examination, measurements of the peak oxygen uptake (peakVO2) and blood biochemical analysis were performed (Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and concentration of creatinine (Cr), total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), and cortisol (C)). A significant change was observed in the concentration of C in the Wheelchair Rugby players' blood between two research periods (p < 0.05 (ES:0.76)) and a correlation between the post-training change in FT/C concentration and the change in Cr concentration (r = -0.6014, p < 0.05). The 6-month training period did not result in overloads within the group of players. However, due to the significant loss of the capacity of the spinal cord injury (SCI) and the possibility of a life-threatening trend, the anabolic/catabolic status of the players should be monitored using blood biochemical indices.


Subject(s)
Football , Spinal Cord Injuries , Wheelchairs , Adult , Football/injuries , Humans , Physical Fitness/physiology , Young Adult
15.
Spinal Cord ; 60(8): 757-762, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713155

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: During the COVID-19 pandemic, several aspects of life have been affected. These aspects have been impacted especially in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). The current study explored the overall effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on quality of life (QOL) domains in persons with SCI as well as evaluated their adherence to WHO-COVID 19-preventive measures. DESIGN: A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted after asking participants to complete an online validated Arabic version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaires including their demographics. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaires were completed targeting two separate occasions to represent their scores prior to and during the pandemic. Participants were asked to rate their adherence to WHO-COVID-19 preventive measures on a 10-point scale. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 115 participants with complete/ incomplete SCI were recruited via social media and contacted by phone to complete the questionnaires. RESULTS: Persons with SCI had lower QOL scores during the COVID-19 period compared to their QOL during the pre-COVID-19 period; all QOL domains (Physical Health, Psychological, Social Relationships, and Environment) showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001). Regarding COVID-19 preventative measures, participants were most likely to endorse self-isolation as well as staying home measures and least likely to adhere to hand washing and social distancing measures. CONCLUSION: The robustly reduced QOL reported by individuals with SCI during the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the need for rehabilitation and mental health services, particularly administered via telehealth, to buffer the effects of the pandemic. Additionally, psychoeducation and support regarding COVID-19 preventative behaviors in this region would be critical.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Egypt , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Cord Injuries/epidemiology , Spinal Cord Injuries/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Eur J Phys Rehabil Med ; 58(3): 405-411, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A history of falls is an important risk factor for future falls, including for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who often experience falls and subsequent injuries. This may be even more pronounced during the current COVID-19 pandemic because of the extreme shortage of hospital admission and restricted access to important services. Therefore, the ability of detecting a history of falls that can be applied to wheelchair users and ambulatory individuals with SCI in various settings are essential. AIM: To investigate the discriminative ability of three clinical measures-the handgrip (HG) test, Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) III and Upper Limb Loading During a Seated Push-Up Test (ULL-SPUT)-in discriminating individuals with SCI with and without a history of falls over the past six months. DESIGN: A 6-month retrospective observational cohort study. SETTING: Inpatient tertiary rehabilitation center. POPULATION: One hundred and fourteen wheelchair users and ambulatory individuals with SCI. METHODS: The participants were interviewed and assessed for their demographics, SCI characteristics and fall data over the past six months, with data confirmation from related events, their caregivers and medical records. Subsequently, they were assessed using the HG test, SCIM III, and ULL-SPUT. RESULTS: In total, 29 participants (25%) fell during the past six months (with the number of falls ranging from 1-20, with minor consequences after the falls). Among the three clinical measures assessed in this study, the ULL-SPUT data of faller participants were significantly higher than those of non-fallers (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The limited rehabilitation length and increased staying home and social isolation prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic may have reduced the fall rates of the participants. The findings suggest a higher likelihood of falls among wheelchair users and ambulatory individuals with SCI who have good mobility as determined using ULL-SPUT data. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Apart from being an important rehabilitation strategy, the present findings suggest an additional benefit of ULL-SPUT to identify individuals with SCI with a likelihood of future falls. The measurement can be done easily using digital bathroom scales placing over a flat and smooth surface. Therefore, it would enable the timely initiation of fall prevention strategies in various clinical, community, home and research settings; particularly in this COVID-19 pandemic of limited beds and hospital services for these individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hand Strength , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation , Upper Extremity
18.
Spinal Cord Ser Cases ; 8(1): 2, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636921

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: An observational study based on an online survey to explore if the participant had experienced (1) cancellation or delay of scheduled health services (2) reduction of assistance provided by a caregiver (3) barriers to social participation and recreational activities. Three validated questionnaires to investigate well-being and symptoms of anxiety and depression were also administered. OBJECTIVES: Our main aim was to quantify the obstacles experienced by adults living with SCI in Italy during COVID-19 pandemic, to explore the presence of depression and anxiety symptoms and to quantify subjective well-being. SETTING: Outpatient clinic of a Spinal Unit in Italy. METHODS: Online survey via direct contact and by e-mail lists. RESULTS: In total, 101 individuals completed the survey. Of, 82.2% participants reported a history of deferment or cancellation of non-COVID-19 health services. The majority (56.4%) revealed that, at least seldom, they have chosen to reduce their usual everyday activities and more than one third (37.6%) affirmed that they had been forced to renounce to one or more of their occupations. Discontinuation of assistance by caregivers was uncommon. The median score of questionnaires measuring depression and anxiety symptoms do not differ significatively when compared with prior studies. The variable that explored the limitations experienced in everyday activities showed a significant correlation with the results of the questionnaires measuring well-being and symptoms of anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that our results could contribute to the discussion ongoing inside our community on how to answer to the new challenges of this pandemic period and of the post-pandemic future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spinal Cord Injuries , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Cord Injuries/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
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