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1.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 123(8): 555-559, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994311

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study was aimed to estimate the effect of one-year persistence of COVID-19 anti-pandemic measures on the posture and spine in children of younger school age in Slovakia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 135 children aged between 6 and 9 years participated in this study. The examination of posture and spine was carried out in 4 schools in 4 different districts in Slovakia. The posture was evaluated in February 2020, before anti-pandemic restrictions and in period from May 2021, after one year of anti-pandemic restrictions. Modified methodology according to Napoleon Wolanski was used to evaluate the posture. RESULTS: For the entire study group, the mean posture disorder level score before anti-pandemic restrictions was 5.667 (±1.75) and it rose to 7.844 (±0.64). Prevalence of posture disorders rose from 71.11 % to 91.3 % in the study group. The most affected segments were lumbar spine and pelvis, followed by deformities of the thoracis spinae. The mean pathology level score for entire group in these segments rose as followed: in the lumbar spine from 0.6 (±0.61) to 1.022 (±0.75); in the pelvis from 0.444 (±0.54) to 0.772 (±0.73) and in the thoracis spine from 0.378 (±0.53) to 0.578 (±0.61). CONCLUSION: Study confirmed a worsening of the posture and spine in school children after a one year of strict anti-pandemic measures. As postural changes increased by 20 % during the year, it seems necessary to implement appropriate preventives programs for children, which could have the potential to improve their postural state (Tab. 2, Fig. 1, Ref. 37). Text in PDF www.elis.sk Keywords: anti-pandemic restriction, e-learning, COVID-19, postural disorders, spine deformities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Posture , Schools , Slovakia/epidemiology , Spine
2.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 104(12): 1039-1045, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938521
3.
World Neurosurg ; 164: e1043-e1048, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867899

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare accuracy of surgical plans generated from in-person and telemedicine evaluations and assess the reasons for surgical plan changes between initial evaluation and surgery. The secondary objective was to assess the effect of changes in surgical planning on postoperative outcomes. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, consecutive patients who were evaluated as new patients by orthopaedic spine faculty between 2019 and 2021 were divided by appointment type: telemedicine (n = 39) and in-person (n = 92). Patients were included if the surgeon documented a definitive surgical plan at the initial visit. The primary outcome was change in surgical plan from initial assessment to actual procedure performed. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the accuracy of initial surgical plans between the telemedicine and in-person cohorts (79.5% vs. 82.6%, P = 0.673). The most common modification in the surgical plan (79%) was change in the number of operated levels, of which 18 of 19 patients had 1 added operated level. Less common reasons were change in approach (13%) and change in procedure (8%). Patients with changes to their surgical plan experienced longer length of stay (3.1 vs. 2.0 days, P = 0.027) than patients with consistent surgical plans. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine and in-person evaluations generated similarly accurate surgical plans. Changes to the initial surgical plans most often involved adding operative levels. Our findings show that telemedicine visits are an acceptable option for preoperative assessment to generate surgical plans; however, further research is needed.


Subject(s)
Orthopedics , Telemedicine , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Spine/surgery , Telemedicine/methods
4.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(7): e52, 2022 Feb 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706942

ABSTRACT

Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) has been reported as rare complication of vaccination. Herein, we report 2 cases of ATM after the administration of an mRNA vaccine for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The first one is an 81-year-old man who received the BNT162b2 vaccine. He presented with bilateral hand weakness. Spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high signal intensity from the C1 to C3 vertebrae. The second is a 23-year-old woman who received the BNT162b2 vaccine and experienced tingling in her legs. Spine MRI showed a high signal intensity lesion at the conus medullaris. These patients were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone and their symptoms improved slightly. Careful follow-up is needed to identify adverse events after the administration of mRNA vaccines for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
/adverse effects , Hand/physiopathology , Leg/physiopathology , Myelitis, Transverse/pathology , Spinal Cord/physiopathology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Myelitis, Transverse/diagnosis , Myelitis, Transverse/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spine/diagnostic imaging , Young Adult
5.
J Clin Neurosci ; 97: 21-24, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611872

ABSTRACT

There is minimal information on COVID-19 pandemic's national impact on pediatric neurosurgical operative volumes. In this study, using a national database, TriNetX, we compared the overall and seasonal trends of pediatric neurosurgical procedure volumes in the United States during the pandemic to pre-pandemic periods. In the United States, the incidence of COVID-19 began to rise in September 2020 and reached its maximum peak between December 2020 and January 2021. During this time, there was an inverse relationship between pediatric neurosurgical operative volumes and the incidence of COVID-19 cases. From March 2020 to May 2021, there was a significant decrease in the number of pediatric shunt (-11.7% mean change, p = 0.006), epilepsy (-16.6%, p < 0.001), and neurosurgical trauma (-13.8%, p < 0.001) surgeries compared to pre-pandemic years. The seasonal analysis also yielded a broad decrease in most subcategories in spring 2020 with significant decreases in pediatric spine, epilepsy, and trauma cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report a national decline in pediatric shunt, epilepsy, and neurosurgical trauma operative volumes during the pandemic. This could be due to fear-related changes in health-seeking behavior as well as underdiagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures , SARS-CoV-2 , Spine , United States/epidemiology
7.
J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) ; 29(3): 23094990211060967, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571729

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected people in various ways, including restricting their mobility and depriving them of exercise opportunities. Such circumstances can trigger locomotor deterioration and impairment, which is known as locomotive syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of locomotive syndrome in the pandemic and to identify its risk factors. Methods: This was a multicenter questionnaire survey performed between 1 November 2020 and 31 December 2020 in Japan. Patients who visited the orthopedics clinic were asked to answer a questionnaire about their symptoms, exercise habits, and locomotor function at two time points, namely, pre-pandemic and post-second wave (current). The incidence of locomotive syndrome in the COVID-19 pandemic was investigated. Additionally, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for developing locomotive syndrome during the pandemic. Results: A total of 2829 patients were enrolled in this study (average age: 61.1 ± 17.1 years; 1532 women). The prevalence of locomotive syndrome was 30% pre-pandemic, which increased significantly to 50% intra-pandemic. Among the patients with no symptoms of locomotive syndrome, 30% developed it in the wake of the pandemic. In the multinomial logistic regression analysis, older age, deteriorated or newly occurring symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders, complaints about the spine or hip/knee joints, and no or decreased exercise habits were independent risk factors for developing locomotive syndrome. Conclusions: The prevalence of locomotive syndrome in patients with musculoskeletal disorders has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to age, locomotor symptoms, especially spine or hip/knee joint complaints, and exercise habits were associated with the development of locomotive syndrome. Although the control of infection is a priority, the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders and ensuring exercise habits are also essential issues to address during a pandemic such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Exercise , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spine
8.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 47(1): 27-33, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570112

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: Survey-based study. OBJECTIVE: We performed a mixed methods study involving patients using telemedicine for spine care. We sought to understand factors influencing the utilization and evaluation of this modality. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Telemedicine has been integrated into routine spine care; its long-term viability will depend not only on optimizing its safety, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness, but also on understanding patient valuation of its benefits and limitations. METHODS: We used a clinical registry to identify spine patients seen virtually by providers at our tertiary academic medical center between March and September of 2020. We distributed an online survey that queried patients' experiences with telemedicine. We performed statistical analyses of Likert-scale questions and a thematic analysis of free-form responses. Sociodemographic data were abstracted and analyzed. RESULTS: Overall, we evaluated 139 patient surveys. High levels of patient-rated care and patient-rated experience were observed for both in-person and telemedicine visits; however, in-person visits were rated significantly higher in both respects (9.3/10 vs. 8.7/10 for patient-rated care, P < 0.001; 9.0/10 vs. 8.4/10 for patient-rated experience, P = 0.006). A preference for in-person first-time visits was observed which was not maintained for follow up appointments. Both patient and clinical factors influenced perceptions of telemedicine. Thematic analysis of free-form responses provided by 113 patients (81%) generated favorable, unfavorable, and reflective themes, each further contextualized by subthemes. Responders were not significantly different from nonresponders across sociodemographic characteristics. CONCLUSION: Our quantitative and qualitative findings yield insight into the patient experience of telemedicine in spine care. A preference for in-person visits was notable, particularly for new patient evaluations. This preference was not maintained for follow-up care. Patients acknowledged the benefits of telemedicine and reflected on its effective integration with in-person care. These results may guide best practices to improve access and patient satisfaction in the future.Level of Evidence: 4.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Patient Outcome Assessment , Patient Satisfaction , Spine
9.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 46(23): E1293-E1294, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511041

Subject(s)
Spine , Telemedicine , Humans
10.
Eur Spine J ; 30(8): 2109-2123, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432544

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To utilize data from a global spine surgeon survey to elucidate (1) overall confidence in the telemedicine evaluation and (2) determinants of provider confidence. METHODS: Members of AO Spine International were sent a survey encompassing participant's experience with, perception of, and comparison of telemedicine to in-person visits. The survey was designed through a Delphi approach, with four rounds of question review by the multi-disciplinary authors. Data were stratified by provider age, experience, telemedicine platform, trust in telemedicine, and specialty. RESULTS: Four hundred and eighty-five surgeons participated in the survey. The global effort included respondents from Africa (19.9%), Asia Pacific (19.7%), Europe (24.3%), North America (9.4%), and South America (26.6%). Providers felt that physical exam-based tasks (e.g., provocative testing, assessing neurologic deficits/myelopathy, etc.) were inferior to in-person exams, while communication-based aspects (e.g., history taking, imaging review, etc.) were equivalent. Participants who performed greater than 50 visits were more likely to believe telemedicine was at least equivalent to in-person visits in the ability to make an accurate diagnosis (OR 2.37, 95% C.I. 1.03-5.43). Compared to in-person encounters, video (versus phone only) visits were associated with increased confidence in the ability of telemedicine to formulate and communicate a treatment plan (OR 3.88, 95% C.I. 1.71-8.84). CONCLUSION: Spine surgeons are confident in the ability of telemedicine to communicate with patients, but are concerned about its capacity to accurately make physical exam-based diagnoses. Future research should concentrate on standardizing the remote examination and the development of appropriate use criteria in order to increase provider confidence in telemedicine technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Telemedicine , Humans , Spine , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Musculoskeletal Care ; 20(2): 316-320, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404594

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating effect on health systems globally. This led to changes in patient access to healthcare particularly spinal services. This study investigates the impact of the pandemic on the volume of patients being referred to and accessing spinal services during both the first and second waves. METHODS: All emergency spinal referrals and related hospital attendances to the emergency department in a busy district general hospital were analysed. The data were evaluated at three time points each covering a 3-month period. Data collected included patient demographics, duration and nature of symptoms, reason for referral, clinical and MRI findings, length of stay in hospital, any interventions performed and the follow-up plan. RESULTS: There were a total of 316 emergency referrals across the three time periods. The number of referrals fell by 15% between the pre-COVID-19 period and the first wave. Comparing the first and second waves, the number of referrals was increased by 58%. Comparing the second wave to the pre-COVID-19 period, referrals were 34% greater in the second wave (p < 0.005). CONCLUSION: We highlight an increase in referrals to our spinal service during the secondary wave, having fallen during the first wave. We hypothesise that the increase in referrals, despite similar restrictions to the first wave, is a result of changing patterns of behaviour due to the fear of contracting COVID during the first wave and difficulty in accessing primary care services in the second wave.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, District , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Spine
15.
Spine J ; 21(12): 2003-2009, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic caused nationwide suspensions of elective surgeries due to reallocation of resources to the care of COVID-19 patients. Following resumption of elective cases, a significant proportion of patients continued to delay surgery, with many yet to reschedule, potentially prolonging their pain and impairment of function and causing detrimental long-term effects. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine differences between patients who have and have not rescheduled their spine surgery procedures originally cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and to evaluate the reasons for continued deferment of spine surgeries even after the lifting of the mandated suspension of elective surgeries. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: Retrospective case series at a single institution PATIENT SAMPLE: Included were 133 patients seen at a single institution where spine surgery was canceled due to a state-mandated suspension of elective surgeries from March to June, 2020. OUTCOME MEASURES: The measures assessed included preoperative diagnoses and neurological dysfunction, surgical characteristics, reasons for surgery deferment, and PROMIS scores of pain intensity, pain interference, and physical function. METHODS: Patient electronic medical records were reviewed. Patients who had not rescheduled their canceled surgery as of January 31, 2021, and did not have a reason noted in their charts were called to determine the reason for continued surgery deferment. Patients were divided into three groups: early rescheduled (ER), late rescheduled (LR), and not rescheduled (NR). ER patients had a date of surgery (DOS) prior to the city's Phase 4 reopening on July 20, 2020; LR patients had a DOS on or after that date. Statistical analysis of the group findings included analysis of variance with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) post-hoc test, independent samples T-test, and chi-square analysis with significance set at p≤.05. RESULTS: Out of 133 patients, 47.4% (63) were in the ER, 15.8% (21) in the LR, and 36.8% (49) in the NR groups. Demographics and baseline PROMIS scores were similar between groups. LR had more levels fused (3.6) than ER (1.6), p= .018 on Tukey HSD. NR (2.1) did not have different mean levels fused than LR or ER, both p= >.05 on Tukey HSD. LR had more three column osteotomies (14.3%) than ER and (1.6%) and NR (2.0%) p=.022, and fewer lumbar microdiscectomies (0%) compared to ER (20.6%) and NR (10.2%), p=.039. Other surgical characteristics were similar between groups. LR had a longer length of stay than ER (4.2 vs 2.4, p=.036). No patients in ER or LR had a nosocomial COVID-19 infection. Of NR, 2.0% have a future surgery date scheduled and 8.2% (4) are acquiring updated exams before rescheduling. 40.8% (20; 15.0% total cohort) continue to defer surgery over concern for COVID-19 exposure and 16.3% (8) for medical comorbidities. 6.1% (3) permanently canceled for symptom improvement. 8.2% (4) had follow-up recommendations for non-surgical management. 4.1% (2) are since deceased. CONCLUSION: Over 1/3 of elective spine surgeries canceled due to COVID-19 have not been performed in the 8 months from when elective surgeries resumed in our institution to the end of the study. ER patients had less complex surgeries planned than LR. NR patients continue to defer surgery primarily over concern for COVID-19 exposure. The toll on the health of these patients as a result of the delay in treatment and on their lives due to their inability to return to normal function remains to be seen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spine
16.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(7)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327625

ABSTRACT

Anaesthesia for patients with severe lung fibrosis post COVID-19 infection requires special consideration. This is due to its propensity to cause perioperative anaesthetic catastrophe and possibility of cross infection among healthcare workers if not properly managed. This interesting article elaborates in detail the anaesthetic and surgical challenges in a morbidly obese patient who had a severe COVID-19 infection presenting for an elective spine surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obesity, Morbid , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Spine/diagnostic imaging , Spine/surgery
17.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(8): 683-684, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311174

Subject(s)
Spine , Humans
18.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e61-e71, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294294

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a surge in the use of telehealth visits across the country to minimize in-person visits and to limit the spread of COVID-19. To date, no standards or outlines for telehealth spine examinations have been detailed and many surgeons simply defer the physical examination when performing telehealth visits. Nevertheless, just as physical examination of the spine is an integral part of live clinical encounters, appropriately modified physical examinations should also be part of virtual visits. METHODS: In this study we provide our methodology for guiding providers and patients in efficiently performing telehealth spine examinations. RESULTS: The study details steps for efficiently performing a physical examination in the telehealth setting. Our written suggestions are supplemented with photographs and video recordings to help streamline the virtual examination. CONCLUSIONS: An effective and efficient spine physical examination can be performed during telehealth visits. Future directions include verifying the findings from our virtual physical examination with in-person examinations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Physical Examination/methods , Spine , Telemedicine/trends , Hand , Humans , Male , Movement , Sensation , Spinal Diseases/diagnosis , Surgeons
20.
J Comput Assist Tomogr ; 45(4): 592-599, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284963

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to aggregate neuroradiological findings in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the brain, head and neck, and spine to identify trends and unique patterns. METHODS: A retrospective review of neuroimaged COVID-19 patients during a 6-week surge in our 8-hospital campus was performed. The brain imaging with reported acute or subacute infarction, intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and all neck examinations were reinterpreted by 2 reviewers. RESULTS: Six hundred seventy-one patients met criteria and were reviewed. Acute or subacute infarction was seen in 39 (6%), intraparenchymal hemorrhage in 14 (2%), corpus callosum involvement in 7, and thalamus in 5 patients. In spine and neck studies, lung opacities and adenopathy were seen in 46 and 4 patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Infarction followed by intraparenchymal hemorrhage was the most common acute findings in the brain with frequent involvement of the corpus callosum and thalami. In the neck, lung abnormalities were frequently present, and adenopathy was almost always associated with a second pathology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Central Nervous System Diseases/complications , Central Nervous System Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Neuroimaging/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Central Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Head/diagnostic imaging , Head/pathology , Humans , Infant , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Neck/diagnostic imaging , Neck/pathology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spine/diagnostic imaging , Spine/pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Young Adult
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