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1.
J Relig Health ; 61(2): 1719-1733, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767559

ABSTRACT

Uncertainty, fear, and distress have become prevalent in the lives of U.S. residents since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The unpredictable reality of social distancing, shutdowns, and isolation have affected daily routines and influenced well-being and health. Drawing on consumer culture theory, we conducted an exploratory study to examine the mediating role of consumer spirituality in the subjective well-being of religious Christians during COVID-19 and to discover links between well-being and health outcomes. Participants from the United States (n = 104) were recruited via a Qualtrics' online panel. Findings show that religiosity among Christians enhanced subjective well-being, demonstrating the positive effect of religious beliefs, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, spiritual consumption mediated this relationship, suggesting the importance of possessions to religious expression and subjective well-being. Implications for messaging about health and well-being are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Religion , Spirituality , United States/epidemiology
2.
J Relig Health ; 61(2): 1703-1718, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767558

ABSTRACT

This study aims to examine the relationship between the levels of hopelessness, loneliness, and spiritual well-being of patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes during the process of COVID-19 outbreak. The study was carried out with diabetic patients living in three different cities that are in the Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey between the dates of 15 of November and 30 of November 2020. The sample of the study consisted of 500 (Type 1, n = 218, Type 2, n = 282) diabetes patients. Data were collected using a demographic information form, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Loneliness Scale (UCLA-LS), and Spiritual Well-being Scale (FACIT-Sp). While the mean scores of hopelessness and loneliness of type 1 patients were below the moderate level, the mean scores of their spiritual well-being were found to be above the moderate level. Moreover, while the mean scores of hopelessness and loneliness in type 2 patients were below the moderate level, the mean scores of their spiritual well-being were found above the moderate level. A significant relationship was found between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes patients' levels of hopelessness, loneliness, and spiritual well-being during the COVID-19 outbreak. It was found that as the spiritual well-being levels of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients increased, the levels of their loneliness and hopelessness decreased. It is recommended that mass communication that includes spiritual care practices can be used effectively to reduce diabetes patients' levels of loneliness and hopelessness during the pandemic. In addition, while providing care to diabetes patients, it can be suggested that health professionals offer a holistic approach with initiatives that will increase diabetes patients' spiritual well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Humans , Loneliness , Spirituality , Turkey/epidemiology
3.
J Pastoral Care Counsel ; 76(1): 66-69, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731482

ABSTRACT

As a family physician, we are trained to practice a biopsychosocial-spiritual approach for a holistic patient care. But a doctor gains deeper appreciation for the importance of addressing a patient's spirituality once he becomes a patient himself. My spirituality played a role in my recovery as a patient. This experience led me to appreciate the unique role a patient's spirituality can play in one's recovery. It has given me a different experience with God.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pastoral Care , Spiritual Therapies , Humans , Male , Spirituality
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(4)2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708296

ABSTRACT

We aimed to assess the association between community belonging, spirituality, and mental health outcomes among Indigenous Peoples during the COVID-19 pandemic. This cross-sectional observational study used online survey distribution and targeted outreach to the local Indigenous community to collect a convenience sample between 23 April 2020 and 20 November 2020. The surveys included demographic information, self-reported symptoms of depression (PHQ-2) and anxiety (GAD-2), and measures of the sense of community belonging and the importance of spirituality. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model the association between the sense of community belonging and spirituality, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Of the 263 self-identified Indigenous people who participated, 246 participants had complete outcome data, including 99 (40%) who reported symptoms of depression and 110 (45%) who reported symptoms of anxiety. Compared to Indigenous participants with a strong sense of community belonging, those with weak community belonging had 2.42 (95% CI: 1.12-5.24)-times greater odds of reporting symptoms of anxiety, and 4.40 (95% CI: 1.95-9.89)-times greater odds of reporting symptoms of depression. While spirituality was not associated with anxiety or depression in the adjusted models, 76% of Indigenous participants agreed that spirituality was important to them pre-pandemic, and 56% agreed that it had become more important since the pandemic began. Community belonging was associated with positive mental health outcomes. Indigenous-led cultural programs that foster community belonging may promote the mental health of Indigenous Peoples.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Indigenous Peoples , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality
6.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 1-5, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649885

ABSTRACT

Three topics are explored in this first issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022, namely: (1) mental health and religion, (2) clinical practice issues and the relevance of religion/spirituality, and finally (3) the continuing and expanding public health crisis of COVID-19 and the associated religious/spiritual impact and response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Religion , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613815

ABSTRACT

Social distancing and the priority given to COVID-19 patients in health services, which caused postponement of appointments and cancer treatment, may have triggered unprecedented levels of distress in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of distress and the levels of spiritual well-being of people initiating chemotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic, identifying the factors associated with distress, and determining if there is a relationship between distress and spiritual well-being. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 91 Brazilians. Data were collected by applying the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) and the Distress Thermometer and Problem List for Patients. The prevalence of distress was 59.5%, and the average score of spiritual well-being was 106.54 (±9.06). Emotional issues were the most reported by patients with distress. The Poisson regression showed that male sex (PR = 0.588; 95% CI 0.392-0.881), age (PR = 0.985; 95% CI 0.973-0.996), and spiritual well-being score were predictors of distress (PR = 0.971; 95% CI 0.946-0.996). These findings indicate that distress relief involves implementation of public health programs capable of integrating spiritual interventions into cancer care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Relig Health ; 61(2): 962-992, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611442

ABSTRACT

Although healthcare professionals have become the symbol of risk and sacrifice during the COVID-19 pandemic, spiritual care practitioners (SCP) have also put themselves at great risk while offering their service in hospitals, hospices and other healthcare facilities. This study was designed to explore the lived experiences of SCP during the current health crisis in Poland. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-four SCP. Nine major themes emerged from the interviews: personal reactions to the pandemic, SCP's perception of the pandemic, the impact of COVID-19 on the provision of spiritual care, spiritual needs during the pandemic, work-related emotions, the impact of the COVID-19 on religion, the role of spiritual care during the outbreak, the healthcare professionals' perceptions of SCP and barriers to the provision of spiritual care during the pandemic. The SCP indicated that although the COVID-19 crisis has affected the availability of pastoral, religious and spiritual care, it has amplified the importance of such care and has positively influenced the visibility of SCP in modern healthcare practice. Nonetheless, in such desperate times, SCP are still neglected and should be further recognised and integrated into the healthcare system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spiritual Therapies , Humans , Pandemics , Poland , Spirituality
9.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 644-656, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611441

ABSTRACT

This study examined the association between spiritual quality of life (QoL), spiritual coping, emotional distress, and personality during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in a convenience sample of Croatian adults (n = 2,860, 80.6% women). Participants completed an online questionnaire that collected information on sociodemographic characteristics, distress (the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale 21), spiritual coping and spiritual QoL (the WHO Quality of Life-Spirituality, Religiousness, and Personal Beliefs), and personality (the International Personality Item Pool). The hierarchical regression analysis demonstrated that personality traits, especially emotional stability, were the most significant predictors of mental health outcomes. Spiritual coping styles were a predictor of worse, while spiritual QoL of better psychological outcomes. Results demonstrate the complex relations between different aspects of spirituality/religiosity with personality and emotional outcomes and suggest that distress motivates the engagement of spiritual coping in times of disaster.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Croatia , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Personality , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 767-785, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605709

ABSTRACT

This study explores the relationship among spirituality, self-efficacy, COVID-19 anxiety, and hopelessness. The participants are comprised of 418 individuals (282 females and 136 males) in Turkey whose ages range between 18 and 61 years old. The participants completed the following surveys: The Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and the Spiritual Orientation Inventory. The relationships among the variables have been examined using path analysis. According to the results, spirituality, self-efficacy, and COVID-19 anxiety have direct effects on hopelessness. The analysis also shows self-efficacy to mediate the relationship between spirituality and hopelessness. The proposed model has good fit indices. The findings are discussed in the context of the literature on COVID-19, spirituality, self-efficacy, and hopelessness, with practical implications for mental health professionals being provided.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spirituality , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey , Young Adult
11.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(3): 604-611, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583487

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study explores nurses' perceived spiritual well-being in the workplace during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Nurses have been working heavy shifts under challenging workplace conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to anxiety and psychological stress. These various challenges at work place their spiritual well-being at risk. METHODS: An unstructured individual online interview was conducted to collect data from 18 nurses from April to August 2021. Data were analysed using the thematic approach. RESULTS: This study highlighted the four themes of spiritual well-being of nurses, namely, "Trust in God," "spiritual encouragement," "spiritual attributes in the workplace," and "spiritual growth." CONCLUSIONS: The study concludes that spirituality is critical in helping nurses overcome the myriad of adversities they face as they assume their important roles during the ongoing pandemic. IMPLICATION FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The study emphasizes that nurses' spiritual aspect during crises is equally important with the other aspects of a nurse's life. Moreover, policies and interventions in hospitals must be implemented to ensure excellent levels of spiritual well-being among nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Spirituality
12.
J Pastoral Care Counsel ; 76(1): 71-72, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582578

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a difficult and trying time, but as most situations in life, it brought both good and bad side effects. Concerning chaplaincy, COVID-19 reveals that we have not arrived yet in the effort to incorporate spiritual care into essential health care delivery. Although chaplaincy is beginning to have a voice, we have been mostly speaking to ourselves. We need an advocacy voice that healthcare systems and policy makers can hear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chaplaincy Service, Hospital , Pastoral Care , Clergy , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Spirituality
13.
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther ; 53(4): 350-357, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538710

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present paper is to describe the real possibilities of providing spiritual care in intensive care units (ICUs) in Poland. Faced with suffering and death, critically ill patients and their families need a source of comfort and hope. Spiritual care is intended to bring relief to them by responding to their spiritual needs. The literature review indicates the positive effects of providing spiritual care in ICUs. Spiritual care improves the quality of life of patients, satisfaction with medical care and even prevents or alleviates the negative psychological consequences of hospitalization. Moreover, it is beneficial to the ICU personnel, to their motivation, work efficiency, well-being and reduces the risk of burnout. Basic spiritual care that can be provided by any ICU physician on a daily basis is nothing more than the way of behaving towards a patient: seeing an individual who has his/her dignity, history, personality, beliefs, fears and hopes. Whenever disease-associated stress has led to an existential crisis, the ICU staff may request a hospital chaplain's visit. The physician can support the conscious patient by establishing a relationship with him: by showing concern, compassion and solicituide. According to some researchers, each patient admitted to the ICU should be asked questions about spiritual issues. If faith is important to the patient, it is necessary to allow him/her to use religious resources, which requires cooperation with a hospital chaplain. The paper discusses the ways the hospital chaplaincy operates in Poland and worldwide. Furthermore, the education of chaplains abroad and the scope of their tasks and activities are described.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Spiritual Therapies , Clergy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Spirituality
14.
J Christ Nurs ; 38(3): E28-E31, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532593

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nurses who provided care to patients with coronavirus (COVID-19) and supported patients in their transition from life to death in the absence of patients' families have been especially needful of spiritual self-care. A spiritual first aid kit can help nurses cope with these difficult times. Spiritual self-care is vital for all nurses to renew and preserve the psychological, spiritual, and physical self.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Self Efficacy , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care/psychology , First Aid , Humans , Spirituality
15.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 75(1): e20201011, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515494

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to understand how religiosity can influence the health of individuals diagnosed with mental disorders, based on comprehensive care. METHODS: this is an integrative literature review, with the inclusion of articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish, between 2010 and 2018. RESULTS: the critical analysis and qualitative synthesis of the 24 selected studies were categorized into two subtopics: The influence of religiosity in promoting comprehensive mental health care; Mental health versus religiosity: influencing conditions for effective access to comprehensive care. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: a positive influence of religiosity was identified in the lives of individuals diagnosed with mental disorders; however, evidence shows that health teams do not feel comfortable and prepared to work with religiosity as an expression of spirituality. This being one of the dimensional aspects of health, it can be inferred, on the results, the existence of this gap in the comprehensive care approach.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Spiritual Therapies , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health , Religion , Spirituality
16.
J Relig Health ; 61(1): 786-797, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514057

ABSTRACT

Our study was conducted to determine the spiritual care needs and death anxiety levels of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19. The population consisted of patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Turkey. The mean total Spiritual Care Requirements Scale score of the participants was 67.05 ± 26.30. The mean VAS for Death Anxiety score of the participants was 8.82 ± 1.26. In our study, it was found that the patients diagnosed with COVID-19 had an increased need for spiritual care and high levels of anxiety about death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spiritual Therapies , Anxiety , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality , Turkey
18.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(10)2021 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480863

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Health anxiety is one of the most common problems in patients with coronary artery disease. The present study tested whether health anxiety severity could be predicted by spiritual well-being and hope in patients with advanced coronary artery disease. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 100 patients with advanced coronary artery disease were recruited from hospitals and healthcare centers in Iran. Patients completed self-report scales, including the Spiritual Well-Being Scale, Adult Hope Scale, and Short Health Anxiety Inventory. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to empirically explore the relations among variables. Results: Results indicated that patients who reported higher levels of hope (ß = 0.42, p < 0.01) and spiritual well-being (ß = 0.20, p < 0.05) reported lower levels of health anxiety. Agency (ß = 0.58, p < 0.01) scores were a significant negative predictor of health anxiety severity. Additionally, religious spirituality scores (ß = 0.28, p < 0.01) were shown to significantly negatively predict health anxiety level. However, the pathways components of hope and existential spirituality were not significant predictors. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicate that spiritual well-being and hope could be important factors in determining health anxiety for adults with coronary artery disease, and their role is worthy of further exploration to help improve health anxiety for patients with coronary artery disease.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Disease , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Spirituality
19.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(9): 1281-1285, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478142

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic influences the spirituality and mental health of individuals. It also has caused a global economic recession. COVID-19 is easily transmitted and causes death. Consequently, severe prevention and control measures of COVID 19 are required in this situation. This study aims to analyze the relationship between anxiety, stigma, religiosity, economic conditions, and the prevention of COVID-19. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional study was designed. The data collection was taken through online surveys. The population in this study is ninety-two lecturers from the College of Health Sciences and the State Islamic Institute who were chosen using a non-probability snowball sampling technique. Data analysis used logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The results showed that there was a relationship between anxiety (p = 0.001), stigma (p = 0.008), religiosity (p = 0.005) and the efforts to prevent COVID-19, while economic conditions (p = 0.882) were not related to the preventive efforts. The results of multivariate analysis indicated that the most influential variable affecting COVID-19 preventions was the level of anxiety, with an Odds Ratio of 4.9. CONCLUSIONS: There was a relationship between anxiety, stigma, religiosity, and COVID-19 preventions, while there was no relationship between economic conditions and COVID-19 preventions. The most influencing variable was anxiety. Respondents must be able to manage anxiety levels related to COVID-19 with good coping strategies.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Faculty , Social Stigma , Spirituality , Adult , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Islam , Male , Mental Health , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
J Relig Health ; 60(6): 3753-3758, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465888

ABSTRACT

Four substantial topics are explored in this issue of the Journal of Religion and Health, namely: (1) Christianity, (2) family and faith dynamics, (3) the spiritual and religious experiences of students from Islamic, Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, and Jewish perspectives, and lastly, (4) the lingering effects of COVID-19. This issue also notes the diamond jubilee-60th year-of JORH (2021).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Christianity , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirituality , Students
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