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1.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 35, 2022 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879241

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In April 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) Information Network for Epidemics produced an agenda for managing the COVID-19 infodemic. "Infodemic" refers to the overabundance of information-including mis- and disinformation. In this agenda it was pointed out the need to create a competency framework for infodemic management (IM). This framework was released by WHO on 20th September 2021. This paper presents the WHO framework for IM by highlighting the different investigative steps behind its development. METHODS: The framework was built through three steps. Step 1 included the preparatory work following the guidelines in the Guide to writing Competency Framework for WHO Academy courses. Step 2 was based on a qualitative study with participants (N = 25), identified worldwide on the basis of their academic background in relevant fields of IM or of their professional experience in IM activities at the institutional level. The interviews were conducted online between December 2020 and January 2021, they were video-recorded and analyzed using thematic analysis. In Step 3, two stakeholder panels were conducted to revise the framework. RESULTS: The competency framework contains four primary domains, each of which comprised main activities, related tasks, and knowledge and skills. It identifies competencies to manage and monitor infodemics, to design, conduct and evaluate appropriate interventions, as well as to strengthen health systems. Its main purpose is to assist institutions in reinforcing their IM capacities and implementing effective IM processes and actions according to their individual contexts and resources. CONCLUSION: The competency framework is not intended to be a regulatory document nor a training curriculum. As a WHO initiative, it serves as a reference tool to be applied according to local priorities and needs within the different countries. This framework can assist institutions in strengthening IM capacity by hiring, staff development, and human resources planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Humans , Staff Development , World Health Organization
2.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 552, 2022 Apr 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808367

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented challenge for health and social care systems globally. There is an urgent need for research on experiences of COVID-19 at different levels of health systems, including lessons from professional, organisational and local system responses, that can be used to inform managerial and policy responses. METHODS: This paper presents the findings from a thematic analysis of front-line staff experiences working across the Norfolk and Waveney integrated care system (ICS) in the East of England during April and October 2020 to address the question "What are the experiences and perceptions of partner organisations and practitioners at multiple levels of the health system in responding to COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic?" This question was posed to learn from how practitioners, interdependent partner organisations and the system experienced the pandemic and responded. 176 interview transcripts derived from one to one and focus group interviews, meeting notes and feedback from a "We Care Together" Instagram campaign were submitted for qualitative thematic analysis to an external research team at a regional University commissioned to undertake an independent evaluation. Three phases of qualitative analysis were systematically undertaken to derive the findings. FINDINGS: Thirty-one themes were distilled highlighting lessons learned from things that went well compared with those that did not; challenges compared with the celebrations and outcomes; learning and insights gained; impact on role; and system headlines. The analysis supported the ICS to inform and capitalise on system wide learning for integration, improvement and innovations in patient and care home resident safety, and staff wellbeing to deal with successive waves of the pandemic as well as prioritising workforce development priorities as part of its People Plan. CONCLUSIONS: The findings contribute to a growing body of knowledge about what impact the pandemic has had on health and social care systems and front-line practitioners globally. It is important to understand the impact at all three levels of the system (micro, meso and macro) as it is the meso and macro system levels that ultimately impact front line staff experiences and the ability to deliver person centered safe and effective care in any context. The paper presents implications for future workforce and health services policy, practice innovation and research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , England/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Staff Development
3.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 36(S1): 5-8, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718309

ABSTRACT

This Special Issue is dedicated to the healthcare workers across the globe. It draws together studies from different disciplines and regions to identify important lessons learned on weaknesses as well as on opportunities for health workforce innovation through a global health lens. Beginning with strategic reflections on the role of the health workforce and public health competences in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, major themes include the protection and experiences of frontline healthcare workers, the role of health systems and policy, planning and management issues, and education and health labour markets. Developed in collaboration with European Public Health Association 'Health Workforce Research' section, the Special Issue contributes to the WHO International Year of Health and Care Workers (YHCW) in 2021 in recognition of their dedication to providing care during the COVID-19 pandemic, even risking their own health and life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Health Workforce , Staff Development , Disasters , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Nurs Manag (Harrow) ; 29(3): 32-40, 2022 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705399

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, nurse leaders and managers have been compelled to prioritise immediate issues in their clinical areas and put aside the professional development of staff. However, leadership development for individuals and teams is essential to ensure nurses feel valued and develop the skills required for team cohesion, problem-solving, decision-making and innovation. Simple and effective approaches to staff leadership development are needed. Two such approaches are coaching and action learning. This article provides an introduction to coaching and action learning as approaches nurse leaders and managers can use to promote leadership development among individual team members and within the team. It describes how coaching and action learning work and their potential benefits and challenges. It explains how the two approaches can be used to underpin effective problem-solving and goal setting, and support nurses in their professional development, the ultimate aim being to deliver safe and effective patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Nurse Administrators , Humans , Leadership , Problem-Based Learning , Staff Development
5.
Anesth Analg ; 133(6): 1497-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607763

ABSTRACT

Research has shown that women have leadership ability equal to or better than that of their male counterparts, yet proportionally fewer women than men achieve leadership positions and promotion in medicine. The Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) was founded within the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) in 2018 as a multidimensional program to help address the significant career development, leadership, and promotion gender gap between men and women in anesthesiology. Herein, we describe WELI's development and implementation with an early assessment of effectiveness at 2 years. Members received an anonymous, voluntary survey by e-mail to assess whether they believed WELI was beneficial in several broad domains: career development, networking, project implementation and completion, goal setting, mentorship, well-being, and promotion and leadership. The response rate was 60.5% (92 of 152). The majority ranked several aspects of WELI to be very or extremely valuable, including the protégé-advisor dyads, workshops, nomination to join WELI, and virtual facilitated networking. For most members, WELI helped to improve optimism about their professional future. Most also reported that WELI somewhat or absolutely contributed to project improvement or completion, finding new collaborators, and obtaining invitations to be visiting speakers. Among those who applied for promotion or leadership positions, 51% found WELI to be somewhat or absolutely valuable to their application process, and 42% found the same in applying for leadership positions. Qualitative analysis of free-text survey responses identified 5 main themes: (1) feelings of empowerment and confidence, (2) acquisition of new skills in mentoring, coaching, career development, and project implementation, (3) clarification and focus on goal setting, (4) creating meaningful connections through networking, and (5) challenges from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the inability to sustain the advisor-protégé connection. We conclude that after 2 years, the WELI program has successfully supported career development for the majority of protégés and advisors. Continued assessment of whether WELI can meaningfully contribute to attainment of promotion and leadership positions will require study across a longer period. WELI could serve as a programmatic example to support women's career development in other subspecialties.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiologists , Empowerment , Gender Equity , Leadership , Pediatricians , Physicians, Women , Sexism , Women, Working , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Career Mobility , Female , Humans , Male , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(12): 537-540, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598060

ABSTRACT

When we look back on 2020, it is hard not to focus on the COVID-19 pandemic that has affected everything from nursing practice to world politics. Along with those challenges, there has been tremendous opportunity for nursing professional development change and growth. 2020 brought several key issues into play related to nursing continuing professional development. This article highlights many of these important issues. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(12):537-540.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Staff Development/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
7.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1854066, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574662

ABSTRACT

Universities worldwide are pausing in an attempt to contain COVID-19's spread. In February 2019, universities in China took the lead, cancelling all in-person classes and switching to virtual classrooms, with a wave of other institutes globally following suit. The shift to online platform poses serious challenges to medical education so that understanding best practices shared by pilot institutes may help medical educators improve teaching. Provide 12 tips to highlight strategies intended to help on-site medical classes moving completely online under the pandemic. We collected 'best practices' reports from 40 medical schools in China that were submitted to the National Centre for Health Professions Education Development. Experts' review-to-summary cycle was used to finalize the best practices in teaching medical students online that can benefit peer institutions most, under the unprecedented circumstances of the COVID-19 outbreak. The 12 tips presented offer-specific strategies to optimize teaching medical students online under COVID-19, specifically highlighting the tech-based pedagogy, counselling, motivation, and ethics, as well as the assessment and modification. Learning experiences shared by pilot medical schools and customized properly are instructive to ensure a successful transition to e-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , China , Faculty, Medical/education , Faculty, Medical/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Problem-Based Learning , SARS-CoV-2 , Staff Development/organization & administration , Teaching
10.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e6, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367406

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the experiences of clinical leads in paediatric critical care units (PCCUs) in England and Wales during the reorganisation of services in the initial surge of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and to learn lessons for future surges and service planning. METHODS: A qualitative study design using semistructured interviews via virtual conferencing was conducted with consultant clinical leads and lead nurses covering 21 PCCUs. Interviews were conducted over a period of 2 weeks, 2 months after the initial SARS-CoV-2 surge. Interview notes underwent thematic analysis. RESULTS: Thematic analysis revealed six themes: leadership, management and planning; communication; workforce development and training; innovation; workforce experience; and infection prevention and control. Leadership was facilitated through clinician-led local autonomy for decision-making and services were better delivered when the workforce was empowered to be flexible in their response. Communication was preferred through collaborative management structures. Further lessons include recognising workforce competencies in surge preparations, the use of virtual technology in facilitating training and meetings, the importance of supporting the well-being of the workforce and the secondary consequences of personal protective equipment use. CONCLUSIONS: During the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, an agile response to a rapidly changing situation was enabled through effective clinical leadership and an adaptive workforce. Open systems of communication across senior clinical and management teams facilitated service planning. Support for all members of the workforce through implementation of appropriate and innovative education and well-being solutions was vital in sustaining resilience. This learning supports planning for future surge capacity across paediatric critical care locally and nationally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Hospital Planning , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pandemics , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Cross Infection/prevention & control , England/epidemiology , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Interdisciplinary Communication , Leadership , Organizational Innovation , Patient Care Team , Personal Protective Equipment , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Staff Development , Wales/epidemiology
11.
Int J Health Plann Manage ; 36(S1): 92-111, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIM: The study describes the experiences and opinions of Serbian physicians regarding workforce management during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS & METHODS: A total of 1553 licensed physicians (65% males; average age 44.0 years) responded to an online survey in September 2020. Differences in the respondents' general data and attitudes regarding workforce management and outbreak preparedness in Serbia were analysed in relation to their engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic (Pearson χ2 and the independent samples t-test, p < 0.05). The logistic regression model explained the need for changing health workforce management. RESULTS: The results reveal that the physicians engaged in the fight against the spread of COVID-19 (64.4% of the respondents) more often than their counterparts, were clinicians from the public sector, younger, with less work experience, influenced negatively by the pandemic, and reassigned to other positions (p < 0.001). Health workers dissatisfied with workplace preparedness and those reassigned due to COVID-19 were by 2.61 times and 1.38 times, respectively, more likely than their counterparts to consider changes in health workforce management. DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION: COVID-19 underlines the need for changes in health workforce management during public health emergencies. An internal incident management team and a panel of external experts may support health workforce management during the prolonged and rapidly changing crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personnel Management , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management , Serbia , Staff Development , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(1): 1-2, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305453
13.
Med Teach ; 42(7): 828-829, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279953

ABSTRACT

The current disruptive and abrupt transition to remote activities that educational institutions are facing represents a major challenge for the entire academic community. While most concerns have centred on how learning activities may successfully transit from face-to-face to remote delivery, little attention has been given to how educators can be supported in this new unchartered territory. In this article, we discuss the crucial role of team leaders and how their management and leadership style may have great potential to support educators' motivation. Based on Self-determination Theory, we offer a framework through which team leaders may contribute to create optimal remote working environments for educators. We argue that educators' autonomous motivation depends on how they perceive their remote work environment as supportive of their basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness. Then, we highlight a series of practical recommendations by which team leaders may be more needs-supportive. Working from home requires space, trust, open communication and flexibility, especially considering that team members may have different clinical or personal circumstances. We therefore hope these suggestions are helpful to cultivate educators' autonomous motivation, which is beneficial not only for themselves but also for others in their institution, including their co-workers and students.


Subject(s)
Motivation , Personal Autonomy , Staff Development , COVID-19 , Humans , Learning , Pandemics
14.
Korean J Med Educ ; 33(2): 139-145, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249704

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Seoul National University College of Medicine operates a faculty development program for clinical teachers at multiple affiliated teaching hospitals. In 2020, the program was moved online due to coronavirus disease 2019. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is feasible and effective to provide faculty development programs online in terms of clinical teachers' participation and satisfaction in comparison with offline programs. METHODS: Clinical teachers participated in the clinical teaching methods programs offline in 2019 and online in 2020. We analyzed participation rate and satisfaction level. All surveys items were rated on a 5-point Likert scale. We also interviewed instructors about the advantages and drawbacks of the online program. RESULTS: The participation rate of the online program (89.5%) was significantly higher than that of the offline program (67.8%). The overall satisfaction level for the online program (4.37) was similar to that for the offline program (4.50). CONCLUSION: Faculty development programs online are feasible and effective in medical education. We need to design training content that fits online programs, consider various online training methods to reinforce the strengths of online programs, and support participants to make good use of these programs.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Faculty, Medical/education , Schools, Medical , Staff Development/methods , Teaching/education , Universities , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Feasibility Studies , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Republic of Korea
15.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(3): 176-182, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246815

ABSTRACT

A two-phase research study was conducted to inform the upcoming fourth edition of Nursing Professional Development: Scope and Standards of Practice. This column describes Phase 1, which used a virtual world café methodology to gather qualitative data from 32 nursing professional development experts. Eighteen themes emerged from the data supporting the six responsibilities of the nursing professional development practitioner. Researchers found the virtual world café to be a useful technique for eliciting expert opinions.


Subject(s)
Internationality , Nurses , Scope of Practice , Staff Development/trends , Humans , Specialties, Nursing
17.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(3): 151-153, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165568

ABSTRACT

The decision to continue a career advancement program in midst of our health system's response to the COVID-19 pandemic was made after weighing the pros and cons. At a time when high priority was placed on educating the frontline nurses on rapidly changing protocols and supporting mental health, our organization reallocated resources and ways of doing things in order to maintain some form of normalcy. By doing so, we were able to demonstrate our commitment to professional development even in the face of adversity and highlight the resourcefulness of nursing professional development practitioners. As the COVID-19 crisis has laid bare, we live in an increasingly complex and interconnected world, and agility will be essential to future nursing professional development practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Career Mobility , Nursing Staff/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Evaluation Research
18.
Dig Liver Dis ; 53(5): 534-539, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The present study was aimed to assess the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and associated factors among HCWs in endoscopy centers in Italy. METHODS: All members of the Italian Society of Digestive Endoscopy (SIED) were invited to participate to a questionnaire-based survey during the first months of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy. RESULTS: 314/1306 (24%) SIED members accounting for 201/502 (40%) endoscopic centers completed the survey. Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) were available in most centers, but filtering face-piece masks (FFP2 or FFP3) and negative pressure room were not in 10.9 and 75.1%. Training courses on PPE use were provided in 57.2% of centers only; there was at least one positive HCW in 17.4% of centers globally, 107/3308 (3.2%) HCWs were diagnosed with COVID-19 with similar rates of physicians (2.9%), nurses (3.5%) and other health operators (3.5%). Involvement in a COVID-19 care team (OR: 4.96) and the lack of training courses for PPE, (OR: 2.65) were associated with increased risk. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of COVID-19 among endoscopy HCWs was not negligible and was associated with work in a COVID-19 care team and lack of education on proper PPE use. These data deserve attention during the subsequent waves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endoscopy, Digestive System , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Endoscopy, Digestive System/methods , Endoscopy, Digestive System/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Needs Assessment , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , Staff Development/supply & distribution
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