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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(3)2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723594

ABSTRACT

A man fully mRNA-vaccinated against COVID-19 presented to our hospital with an acute febrile illness, respiratory symptoms and a positive test for SARS-CoV-2. He was later found early into hospitalisation to have two morbid bacterial co-infections: Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although this patient was initially admitted for COVID-19 management, his initial presentation was remarkable for lobar pneumonia, hyponatraemia and rhabdomyolysis more compatible with Legionnaire's disease than severe COVID-19. On discovery of MRSA pneumonia as a second bacterial infection, immunosuppressive COVID-19 therapies were discontinued and targeted antibiotics towards both bacterial co-infections were initiated. The patient's successful recovery highlighted the need to have high suspicion for bacterial co-infections in patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia and a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, as patients with serious bacterial co-infections may have worse outcomes with use of immunosuppressive COVID-19 therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Community-Acquired Infections , Legionella pneumophila , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Staphylococcal Infections , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/diagnosis , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcus aureus
2.
Am J Med Sci ; 364(1): 16-22, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can progress to cardiovascular complications which are linked to higher in-hospital mortality rates. Infective endocarditis (IE) can develop in patients with recent COVID-19 infections, however, characterization of IE following COVID-19 infection has been lacking. To better characterize this disease, we performed a systematic review with descriptive analysis of the clinical features and outcomes of these patients. METHODS: Our search was conducted in 8 databases for all published reports of probable or definite IE in patients with a prior COVID-19 confirmed diagnosis. After ensuring an appropriate inclusion of the articles, we extracted data related to clinical characteristics, modified duke criteria, microbiology, outcomes, and procedures. RESULTS: Searches generated a total of 323 published reports, and 20 articles met our inclusion criteria. The mean age of patients was 52.2 ± 16.9 years and 76.2% were males. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 8 (38.1%) patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 3 patients (14.3%) and Streptococcus mitis/oralis in 2 (9.5%) patients. The mean time interval between COVID-19 and IE diagnoses was 16.7 ± 15 days. Six (28.6%) patients required critical care due to IE, 7 patients (33.3%) underwent IE-related cardiac surgery and 5 patients (23.8%) died during their IE hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review provides a profile of clinical features and outcomes of patients with a prior COVID-19 infection diagnosis who subsequently developed IE. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is essential that clinicians appreciate the possibility of IE as a unique complication of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Staphylococcal Infections , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Endocarditis/epidemiology , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Staphylococcal Infections/complications
3.
Curr Opin Infect Dis ; 35(2): 149-162, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672443

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Some patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may develop pulmonary bacterial coinfection or superinfection, that could unfavorably impact their prognosis. RECENT FINDINGS: The exact burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lung infection in peculiar populations such as patients with COVID-19 remains somewhat elusive, possibly because of wide heterogeneity in methods and endpoints across studies. SUMMARY: There was important heterogeneity in the retrieved literature on the epidemiology of MRSA lung infection in patients with COVID-19, both when considering all other bacteria as the denominator (relative prevalence ranging from 2% to 29%) and when considering only S. aureus as the denominator (relative prevalence ranging from 11% to 65%). Overall, MRSA is among the most frequent causative agents of pulmonary infection in patients with COVID-19. Improving our ability to rapidly reach etiological diagnosis of bacterial lung infection in COVID-19 patients remains fundamental if we are to improve the rates of appropriate antibiotic therapy in patients with COVID-19 and concomitant/superimposed MRSA infection, at the same time avoiding antibiotic overuse in line with antimicrobial stewardship principles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Staphylococcal Infections , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Lung , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcal Infections/epidemiology , Staphylococcus aureus
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(8)2021 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341315

ABSTRACT

A 50-year-old man with no medical history of note presented with new onset of confusion and dyspnoea. He tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19), and subsequently, was admitted to the intensive care unit due to severe sepsis and acute renal failure requiring haemodialysis. Shortly afterwards, he was intubated due to haemodynamic instability. His blood culture was positive for Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia, and echocardiogram showed evidence of vegetation in the aortic valve area. He was commenced on intravenous antibiotics for infective endocarditis (IE). Following extubation, he underwent an MRI of the spine due to increasing back pain. This was suggestive of L5-S1 discitis, likely secondary to septic emboli from IE. A few days later, he developed acute ischaemia of the left toes and extensive thrombosis of the right cubital and left iliac veins. Following a prolonged hospital admission, he was discharged home and later underwent an elective forefoot amputation from which he made a good recovery.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia , COVID-19 , Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Staphylococcal Infections , Endocarditis, Bacterial/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Staphylococcus aureus
5.
Skelet Muscle ; 11(1): 10, 2021 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV2 virus could be potentially myopathic. Serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) is frequently found elevated in severe SARS-CoV2 infection, which indicates skeletal muscle damage precipitating limb weakness or even ventilatory failure. CASE PRESENTATION: We addressed such a patient in his forties presented with features of severe SARS-CoV2 pneumonia and high serum CPK. He developed severe sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and received intravenous high dose corticosteroid and tocilizumab to counter SARS-CoV2 associated cytokine surge. After 10 days of mechanical ventilation (MV), weaning was unsuccessful albeit apparently clear lung fields, having additionally severe and symmetric limb muscle weakness. Ancillary investigations in addition with serum CPK, including electromyogram, muscle biopsy, and muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested acute myopathy possibly due to skeletal myositis. CONCLUSION: We wish to stress that myopathogenic medication in SARS-CoV2 pneumonia should be used with caution. Additionally, serum CPK could be a potential marker to predict respiratory failure in SARS-CoV2 pneumonia as skeletal myopathy affecting chest muscles may contribute ventilatory failure on top of oxygenation failure due to SARS-CoV2 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Creatine Kinase/blood , Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology , Muscular Diseases/physiopathology , Quadriplegia/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adult , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Electromyography , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging , Muscle, Skeletal/pathology , Muscular Diseases/blood , Muscular Diseases/diagnosis , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Neural Conduction , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/physiopathology , Quadriplegia/etiology , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Ventilator Weaning
6.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 20(1): 494, 2020 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1094026

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infective endocarditis has a relevant clinical impact due to its high morbidity and mortality rates. Right-sided endocarditis has lower complication rates than left-sided endocarditis. Common complications are multiple septic pulmonary embolisms, haemoptysis, and acute renal failure. Risk factors associated with right-sided infective endocarditis are commonly related to intravenous drug abuse, central venous catheters, or infections due to implantable cardiac devices. However, patients with congenital ventricular septal defects might be at high risk of endocarditis and haemodynamic complications. CASE PRESENTATION: In the following, we present the case of a 23-year-old man without a previous intravenous drug history with tricuspid valve Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis complicated by acute renal failure and haemoptysis caused by multiple pulmonary emboli. In most cases, right-sided endocarditis is associated with several common risk factors, such as intravenous drug abuse, a central venous catheter, or infections due to implantable cardiac devices. In this case, we found a small perimembranous ventricular septal defect corresponding to a type 2 Gerbode defect. This finding raised the suspicion of a congenital ventricular septal defect complicated by a postendocarditis aneurysmal transformation. CONCLUSIONS: Management of the complications of right-sided infective endocarditis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Echocardiographic approaches should include screening for ventricular septal defects in patients without common risk factors for tricuspid valve endocarditis. Patients with undiagnosed congenital ventricular septal defects are at high risk of infective endocarditis. Therefore, endocarditis prophylaxis after dental procedures and/or soft-tissue infections is highly recommended. An acquired ventricular septal defect is a very rare complication of infective endocarditis. Surgical management of small ventricular septal defects without haemodynamic significance is still controversial.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Coronary Circulation , Endocarditis, Bacterial/microbiology , Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular/physiopathology , Hemodynamics , Hemoptysis/etiology , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Acute Kidney Injury/microbiology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Conservative Treatment , Endocarditis, Bacterial/complications , Endocarditis, Bacterial/diagnosis , Endocarditis, Bacterial/drug therapy , Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular/complications , Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular/diagnostic imaging , Hemoptysis/microbiology , Hemoptysis/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Risk Factors , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
7.
Chest ; 159(2): e107-e113, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1053266

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 53-year-old man presented to the ED at a time of low severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, also known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), prevalence and reported 2 weeks of progressive shortness of breath, dry cough, headache, myalgias, diarrhea, and recurrent low-grade fevers to 39°C for 1 week with several days of recorded peripheral capillary oxygen saturation of 80% to 90% (room air) on home pulse oximeter. Five days earlier, he had visited an urgent care center where a routine respiratory viral panel was reportedly negative. A COVID-19 reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test result was pending at the time of ED visit. He reported a past medical history of gastroesophageal reflux disease that was treated with famotidine. Travel history included an out-of-state trip 3 weeks earlier, but no recent international travel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Bacteremia/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cerebellar Diseases/complications , Cerebellar Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fever/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/physiopathology , Oximetry , Pneumonia, Staphylococcal/complications , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
Arch Iran Med ; 23(8): 568-569, 2020 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-749390

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, we have seen a significant number of cases of a novel coronavirus (2019-nCov), first identified in Wuhan China. Coronavirus might coexist with other infections such as Staphylococcus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coinfection/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Coinfection/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Iran , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/therapy
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 646, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is known as a new viral infection. Viral-bacterial co-infections are one of the biggest medical concerns, resulting in increased mortality rates. To date, few studies have investigated bacterial superinfections in COVID-19 patients. Hence, we designed the current study on COVID-19 patients admitted to ICUs. METHODS: Nineteen patients admitted to our ICUs were enrolled in this study. To detect COVID-19, reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed. Endotracheal aspirate samples were also collected and cultured on different media to support the growth of the bacteria. After incubation, formed colonies on the media were identified using Gram staining and other biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out based on the CLSI recommendations. RESULTS: Of nineteen COVID-19 patients, 11 (58%) patients were male and 8 (42%) were female, with a mean age of ~ 67 years old. The average ICU length of stay was ~ 15 days and at the end of the study, 18 cases (95%) expired and only was 1 case (5%) discharged. In total, all patients were found positive for bacterial infections, including seventeen Acinetobacter baumannii (90%) and two Staphylococcus aureus (10%) strains. There was no difference in the bacteria species detected in any of the sampling points. Seventeen of 17 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii were resistant to the evaluated antibiotics. No metallo-beta-lactamases -producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain was found. One of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates was detected as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and isolated from the patient who died, while another Staphylococcus aureus strain was susceptible to tested drugs and identified as methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings emphasize the concern of superinfection in COVID-19 patients due to Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus. Consequently, it is important to pay attention to bacterial co-infections in critical patients positive for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter Infections/complications , Acinetobacter baumannii/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , Acinetobacter Infections/epidemiology , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Heart Diseases/complications , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Intensive Care Units , Male , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory System/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/epidemiology , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects
11.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 22(6): e13367, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-596059

ABSTRACT

The clinical course and outcomes of immunocompromised patients, such as transplant recipients, with COVID-19 remain unclear. It has been postulated that a substantial portion of the disease burden seems to be mediated by the host immune activation to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Herein, we present a simultaneous heart-kidney transplant (SHKT) recipient who was hospitalized for the management of respiratory failure from volume overload complicated by failure to thrive, multiple opportunistic infections, and open non-healing wounds in the setting of worsening renal dysfunction weeks prior to the first case of SARS-CoV-2 being detected in the state of Connecticut. After his third endotracheal intubation, routine nucleic acid testing (NAT) for SARS-CoV-2, in anticipation of a planned tracheostomy, was positive. His hemodynamics, respiratory status, and ventilator requirements remained stable without any worsening for 4 weeks until he had a negative NAT test. It is possible that the immunocompromised status of our patient may have prevented significant immune activation leading up to clinically significant cytokine storm that could have resulted in acute respiratory distress syndrome and multisystem organ failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/surgery , Heart Transplantation , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Failure, Chronic/surgery , Kidney Transplantation , Malnutrition/immunology , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Antibiotics, Antineoplastic/adverse effects , BK Virus , Bacteremia/complications , Bacteremia/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/chemically induced , Cardiomyopathy, Dilated/complications , Cardiotoxicity , Doxorubicin/adverse effects , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/complications , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/immunology , Humans , Incidental Findings , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Malnutrition/complications , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/therapeutic use , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Polyomavirus Infections/complications , Polyomavirus Infections/immunology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Prednisone/therapeutic use , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/immunology , Surgical Wound Infection/complications , Surgical Wound Infection/immunology , Tacrolimus/therapeutic use , Tracheostomy , Tumor Virus Infections/complications , Tumor Virus Infections/immunology , Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci , Viremia/complications , Viremia/immunology , Water-Electrolyte Imbalance/complications , Water-Electrolyte Imbalance/therapy
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