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6.
Open Heart ; 8(2)2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523054

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Health Service (NHS) recommended that appropriate patients anticoagulated with warfarin should be switched to direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), requiring less frequent blood testing. Subsequently, a national safety alert was issued regarding patients being inappropriately coprescribed two anticoagulants following a medication change and associated monitoring. OBJECTIVE: To describe which people were switched from warfarin to DOACs; identify potentially unsafe coprescribing of anticoagulants; and assess whether abnormal clotting results have become more frequent during the pandemic. METHODS: With the approval of NHS England, we conducted a cohort study using routine clinical data from 24 million NHS patients in England. RESULTS: 20 000 of 164 000 warfarin patients (12.2%) switched to DOACs between March and May 2020, most commonly to edoxaban and apixaban. Factors associated with switching included: older age, recent renal function test, higher number of recent INR tests recorded, atrial fibrillation diagnosis and care home residency. There was a sharp rise in coprescribing of warfarin and DOACs from typically 50-100 per month to 246 in April 2020, 0.06% of all people receiving a DOAC or warfarin. International normalised ratio (INR) testing fell by 14% to 506.8 patients tested per 1000 warfarin patients each month. We observed a very small increase in elevated INRs (n=470) during April compared with January (n=420). CONCLUSIONS: Increased switching of anticoagulants from warfarin to DOACs was observed at the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic in England following national guidance. There was a small but substantial number of people coprescribed warfarin and DOACs during this period. Despite a national safety alert on the issue, a widespread rise in elevated INR test results was not found. Primary care has responded rapidly to changes in patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19 , Drug Substitution/standards , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , State Medicine/standards , Warfarin/administration & dosage , Aged , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Blood Coagulation Tests , Drug Monitoring , Drug Prescriptions , Drug Substitution/adverse effects , Drug Utilization/standards , England , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Safety , Primary Health Care/standards , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Warfarin/adverse effects
8.
Br J Nurs ; 30(15): 938-939, 2021 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357666

ABSTRACT

Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses recent changes to the way in which the Care Quality Commission (CQC) conducts its health and social care inspections.


Subject(s)
Quality Assurance, Health Care , State Medicine , Humans , Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration , State Medicine/standards , United Kingdom
10.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 478-480, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence on perioperative outcomes of surgical patients during the COVID-19 pandemic to inform continued operating into the winter period. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed the rate of 30-day COVID-19 transmission and mortality of all surgical patients in the three hospitals in our trust in the East of England during the first lockdown in March 2020. All patients who underwent a swab were swabbed on or 24 hours prior to admission. RESULTS: There were 4,254 patients and an overall 30-day mortality of 0.99%. The excess surgical mortality in our region was 0.29%. There were 39 patients who were COVID-19 positive within 30 days of admission, 12 of whom died. All 12 were emergency admissions with a length of stay longer than 24 hours. There were three deaths among those who underwent day case surgery, one of whom was COVID-19 negative, and the other two were not swabbed but not suspected to have COVID-19. There were two COVID-19 positive elective cases and none in day case elective or emergency surgery. There were no COVID-19 positive deaths in elective or day case surgery. CONCLUSIONS: There was a low rate of COVID-19 transmission and mortality in elective and day case operations. Our data have allowed us to guide patients in the consent process and provided the evidence base to restart elective and day case operating with precautions and regular review. A number of regions will be similarly affected and should perform a review of their data for the winter period and beyond.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/mortality , Emergency Treatment/mortality , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/standards , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Treatment/standards , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , England/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Admission/standards , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , State Medicine/standards , State Medicine/statistics & numerical data
11.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253327, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269922

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The National Health Service (NHS) abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening programme (NAAASP) in England screens 65-year-old men. The programme monitors those with an aneurysm, and early intervention for large aneurysms reduces ruptures and AAA-related mortality. AAA screening services have been disrupted following COVID-19 but it is not known how this may impact AAA-related mortality, or where efforts should be focussed as services resume. METHODS: We repurposed a previously validated discrete event simulation model to investigate the impact of COVID-19-related service disruption on key outcomes. This model was used to explore the impact of delayed invitation and reduced attendance in men invited to screening. Additionally, we investigated the impact of temporarily suspending scans, increasing the threshold for elective surgery to 7cm and increasing drop-out in the AAA cohort under surveillance, using data from NAAASP to inform the population. FINDINGS: Delaying invitation to primary screening up to two years had little impact on key outcomes whereas a 10% reduction in attendance could lead to a 2% lifetime increase in AAA-related deaths. In surveillance patients, a 1-year suspension of surveillance or increase in the elective threshold resulted in a 0.4% increase in excess AAA-related deaths (8% in those 5-5.4cm at the start). Longer suspensions or a doubling of drop-out from surveillance would have a pronounced impact on outcomes. INTERPRETATION: Efforts should be directed towards encouraging men to attend AAA screening service appointments post-COVID-19. Those with AAAs on surveillance should be prioritised as the screening programme resumes, as changes to these services beyond one year are likely to have a larger impact on surgical burden and AAA-related mortality.


Subject(s)
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/diagnosis , Aortic Rupture/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Age Factors , Aged , Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/complications , Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/mortality , Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/surgery , Aortic Rupture/etiology , Aortic Rupture/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Computer Simulation , Cost of Illness , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , England/epidemiology , Health Policy , Humans , Male , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Mass Screening/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , State Medicine/standards , State Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment , Ultrasonography/standards , Ultrasonography/statistics & numerical data
12.
Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes ; 7(4): 378-387, 2021 07 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246705

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We hypothesized that a decline in admissions with heart failure during COVID-19 pandemic would lead to a reciprocal rise in mortality for patients with heart failure in the community. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used National Heart Failure Audit data to identify 36 974 adults who had a hospital admission with a primary diagnosis of heart failure between February and May in either 2018, 2019, or 2020. Hospital admissions for heart failure in 2018/19 averaged 160/day but were much lower in 2020, reaching a nadir of 64/day on 27 March 2020 [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 0.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38-0.42]. The proportion discharged on guideline-recommended pharmacotherapies was similar in 2018/19 compared to the same period in 2020. Between 1 February-2020 and 31 May 2020, there was a 29% decrease in hospital deaths related to heart failure (IRR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.67-0.75; estimated decline of 448 deaths), a 31% increase in heart failure deaths at home (IRR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.24-1.39; estimated excess 539), and a 28% increase in heart failure deaths in care homes and hospices (IRR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40; estimated excess 189). All-cause, inpatient death was similar in the COVID-19 and pre-COVID-19 periods [odds ratio (OR): 1.02, 95% CI: 0.94-1.10]. After hospital discharge, 30-day mortality was higher in 2020 compared to 2018/19 (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.38-1.78). CONCLUSION: Compared with the rolling daily average in 2018/19, there was a substantial decline in admissions for heart failure but an increase in deaths from heart failure in the community. Despite similar rates of prescription of guideline-recommended therapy, mortality 30 days from discharge was higher during the COVID-19 pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Heart Failure , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cause of Death , Clinical Audit/statistics & numerical data , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Heart Failure/mortality , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , Mortality , Quality of Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , State Medicine/standards , State Medicine/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
15.
BJOG ; 128(5): 917-920, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119183

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the differences in detection rate for gestational diabetes (GDM) comparing the methodology recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) compared with testing described as appropriate during the Covid-19 pandemic by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). DESIGN: Cohort study of women delivering between 1 January 2016 and 1 July 2020. SETTING: London Teaching Hospital. POPULATION: All women delivering between 1 January 2016 and 13 May 2020 and follow up of women screening negative between 1 April 2020 and 13 May 2020. METHODS: Retrospective study of prospectively collected data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Detection rate of gestational diabetes. RESULTS: Using the RCOG guidance, the overall rate of women identified as having gestational diabetes fell from 7.7% (1853/24168) to 4.2% (35/831)(P = 0.0003). Of 230 women who tested negative according to the RCOG criteria from 1 April to 13 May but who subsequently had an oral glucose tolerance test, 47 (20.4%) were diagnosed as having gestational diabetes according to the NICE criteria. CONCLUSIONS: In our setting, the RCOG Covid-19 gestational diabetes screening regime failed to detect 47 of 82 (57%) women subsequently identified as gestational diabetics, and therefore cannot be recommended for general use. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Screening for GDM using RCOG Covid criteria reduced detection rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes, Gestational , Diagnostic Screening Programs , Mass Screening , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Adult , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Diabetes, Gestational/diagnosis , Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology , Diagnostic Screening Programs/organization & administration , Diagnostic Screening Programs/standards , Female , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/trends , Organizational Innovation , Pregnancy , Program Evaluation , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine/standards , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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