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1.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 165-168, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592228

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To test whether distortions in the age distribution of deaths can track pandemic activity. Methods. We compared weekly distributions of all-cause deaths by age during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States from March to December 2020 with corresponding prepandemic weekly baseline distributions derived from data for 2015 to 2019. We measured distortions via Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) and χ2 goodness-of-fit statistics as well as deaths among individuals aged 65 years or older as a percentage of total deaths (PERC65+). We computed bivariate correlations between these measures and the number of recorded COVID-19 deaths for the corresponding weeks. Results. Elevated COVID-19-associated fatalities were accompanied by greater distortions in the age structure of mortality. Distortions in the age distribution of weekly US COVID-19 deaths in 2020 relative to earlier years were highly correlated with COVID fatalities (K-S: r = 0.71, P < .001; χ2: r = 0.90, P < .001; PERC65+: r = 0.85, P < .001). Conclusions. A population-representative sample of age-at-death data can serve as a useful means of pandemic activity surveillance when precise cause-of-death data are incomplete, inaccurate, or unavailable, as is often the case in low-resource environments. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):165-168. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306567).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mortality , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Humans , Middle Aged , Statistics as Topic , Statistics, Nonparametric , United States/epidemiology
2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0252972, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598722

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has clearly shown that efficient management of infectious diseases requires a top-down approach which must be complemented with a bottom-up response to be effective. Here we investigate a novel approach to surveillance for transboundary animal diseases using African Swine (ASF) fever as a model. We collected data both at a population level and at the local level on information-seeking behavior respectively through digital data and targeted questionnaire-based surveys to relevant stakeholders such as pig farmers and veterinary authorities. Our study shows how information-seeking behavior and resulting public attention during an epidemic, can be identified through novel data streams from digital platforms such as Wikipedia. Leveraging attention in a critical moment can be key to providing the correct information at the right moment, especially to an interested cohort of people. We also bring evidence on how field surveys aimed at local workers and veterinary authorities remain a crucial tool to assess more in-depth preparedness and awareness among front-line actors. We conclude that these two tools should be used in combination to maximize the outcome of surveillance and prevention activities for selected transboundary animal diseases such as ASF.


Subject(s)
African Swine Fever/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Epidemiological Monitoring , Livestock/virology , Animals , Awareness , Estonia/epidemiology , Farmers , Internet , Statistics, Nonparametric , Surveys and Questionnaires , Swine
3.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Nov 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573692

ABSTRACT

This study examines the correlation of acute and habitual dietary intake of flavan-3-ol monomers, proanthocyanidins, theaflavins, and their main food sources with the urinary concentrations of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (EPIC). Participants (N = 419, men and women) provided 24-h urine samples and completed a 24-h dietary recall (24-HDR) on the same day. Acute and habitual dietary data were collected using a standardized 24-HDR software and a validated dietary questionnaire, respectively. Intake of flavan-3-ols was estimated using the Phenol-Explorer database. Concentrations of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin in 24-h urine were analyzed using tandem mass spectrometry after enzymatic deconjugation. Simple and partial Spearman's correlations showed that urinary concentrations of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and their sum were more strongly correlated with acute than with habitual intake of individual and total monomers (acute rpartial = 0.13-0.54, p < 0.05; and habitual rpartial = 0.14-0.28, p < 0.01), proanthocyanidins (acute rpartial = 0.24-0.49, p < 0.001; and habitual rpartial = 0.10-0.15, p < 0.05), theaflavins (acute rpartial = 0.22-0.31, p < 0.001; and habitual rpartial = 0.20-0.26, p < 0.01), and total flavan-3-ols (acute rpartial = 0.40-0.48, p < 0.001; and habitual rpartial = 0.23-0.33, p < 0.001). Similarly, urinary concentrations of flavan-3-ols were weakly correlated with both acute (rpartial = 0.12-0.30, p < 0.05) and habitual intake (rpartial = 0.10-0.27, p < 0.05) of apple and pear, stone fruits, berries, chocolate and chocolate products, cakes and pastries, tea, herbal tea, wine, red wine, and beer and cider. Moreover, all comparable correlations were stronger for urinary (-)-epicatechin than for (+)-catechin. In conclusion, our data support the use of urinary concentrations of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, especially as short-term nutritional biomarkers of dietary catechin, epicatechin and total flavan-3-ol monomers.


Subject(s)
Biflavonoids/analysis , Catechin/urine , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Flavonoids/analysis , Proanthocyanidins/analysis , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/urine , Catechin/analysis , Diet Surveys , Eating , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutrition Assessment , Prospective Studies , Statistics, Nonparametric
5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(37): e27228, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501195

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Remdesivir is the only antiviral approved for lower respiratory tract infection produced by SARS-CoV-2. The main objective of this study was to determine the mortality rate, readmissions, mean hospital stay, need for higher levels of oxygen support, and adverse effect-induced abandonment rate in hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and treated with remdesivir (RDSV). The secondary objective was to determine mortality-related risk factors in these patients.The study included a prospective cohort of patients admitted to a third level Spanish hospital between July 5, 2020 and February 3, 2021 for COVID-19 diagnosed by SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction and/or antigen test and treated with RDSV.Remdesivir was received by 185 patients (69.7% males) with a mean age of 62.5 years, median Charlson index of 3 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1-4), and median ambient air oxygen saturation of 91% (IQR: 90-93); 61.6% of patients had hyper-inflammatory syndrome at admission. Median time with symptoms before RDSV treatment was 5 days (IQR: 3-6) and the median hospital stay was 10 days (IQR: 7-15); 19 patients (10.3%) died after a median stay of 13.5 days (IQR: 9.7-24 days), 58 patients (12.9%) were admitted to ICU, 58 (31.4%) needed higher levels of oxygen support, 0.5% abandoned the treatment due to adverse effects, and there were no readmissions. The only mortality-related factor was the need for higher levels of oxygen support (odds ratio 12.02; 95% confidence interval 2.25-64.2).All studied patients were admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of COVID-19 and in respiratory failure, needing initial low-flow oxygen support, and all received RDSV within 1 week of symptom onset. The percent mortality was lower in these patients than was observed in all patients with severe COVID-19 admitted to our center (10.3% vs 20.3%, respectively). Despite receiving RDSV, 1 in 3 patients needed higher levels of oxygen support, the sole mortality-related factor.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Spain , Statistics, Nonparametric
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(32): e26900, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475915

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can lead to serious illness and death, and thus, it is particularly important to predict the severity and prognosis of COVID-19. The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score has been used to predict the clinical outcomes of patients with multiple organ failure requiring intensive care. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics, risk factors, and relationship between the SOFA score and the prognosis of COVID-19 patients.We retrospectively included all patients ≥18 years old who were diagnosed with COVID-19 in the laboratory continuously admitted to Jingzhou Central Hospital from January 16, 2020 to March 23, 2020. The demographic, clinical manifestations, complications, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes of patients infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 were collected and analyzed. Clinical variables were compared between patients with mild and severe COVID-19. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the risk factors for severe COVID-19. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze risk factors for hospital-related death. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival differences were assessed by the log-rank test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the SOFA score in different situations were drawn, and the area under the ROC curve was calculated.A total of 117 patients with confirmed diagnoses of COVID-19 were retrospectively analyzed, of which 108 patients were discharged and 9 patients died. The median age of the patients was 50.0 years old (interquartile range [IQR], 35.5-62.0). 63 patients had comorbidities, of which hypertension (27.4%) was the most frequent comorbidities, followed by diabetes (8.5%), stroke (4.3%), coronary heart disease (3.4%), and chronic liver disease (3.4%). The most common symptoms upon admission were fever (82.9%) and dry cough (70.1%). Regression analysis showed that high SOFA scores, advanced age, and hypertension were associated with severe COVID-19. The median SOFA score of all patients was 2 (IQR, 1-3). Patients with severe COVID-19 exhibited a significantly higher SOFA score than patients with mild COVID-19 (3 [IQR, 2-4] vs 1 [IQR, 0-1]; P  < .001). The SOFA score can better identify severe COVID-19, with an odds ratio of 5.851 (95% CI: 3.044-11.245; P < .001). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the SOFA score in predicting severe COVID-19 (cutoff value = 2; AUC = 0.908 [95% CI: 0.857-0.960]; sensitivity: 85.20%; specificity: 80.40%) and the risk of death in COVID-19 patients (cutoff value = 5; AUC = 0.995 [95% CI: 0.985-1.000]; sensitivity: 100.00%; specificity: 95.40%). Regarding the 60-day mortality rates of patients in the 2 groups classified by the optimal cutoff value of the SOFA score (5), patients in the high SOFA score group (SOFA score ≥5) had a significantly greater risk of death than those in the low SOFA score group (SOFA score < 5).The SOFA score could be used to evaluate the severity and 60-day mortality of COVID-19. The SOFA score may be an independent risk factor for in-hospital death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Adult , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Statistics, Nonparametric
7.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e0042, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1472363

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the Dentists' practice in compliance with general and guidelines for handling Coronavirus Disease 2019. Material and Methods: PubMed, Embase, ISI, Scopus, Medicine have been used to search for articles until September 2020. EndNote X9 was used to manage electronic resources as a resource. Joanna Briggs Institute reviewer's manual (JBI) tools was used to assess the quality of studies included in the current systematic and meta-analysis review. The 95% confidence interval (CI) effect size, the random effect model, and the Restricted maximum-likelihood (REML) methods have all been calculated. I2 values of more than 50% indicated moderate-to-high heterogeneity. Stata/MP v.16 (the fastest version of Stata) statistical software was used to evaluate the Meta-analysis. Results: 39 articles were found in the initial keyword search. The full text of 16 studies was reviewed, and six studies were selected in the end. 72% of participants used a face mask during the dental procedure (72%, 95% CI; 40%-100%). 63% of participants measured fever when patients arrived during the COVID-19 pandemic (63%, 95% CI; 46%-79%). Moreover, 72% of participants used a face mask during the dental procedure (72%, 95% CI; 40%-100%). According to JBI tools, all studies had a moderate risk of bias. Conclusion: The results show that the performance of dental professionals in the conditions of the COVID-19 epidemic is not favorable. Training should be under the standards of treatment guidelines and further measures so that dental professionals can show proper practice by increasing their awareness of this virus and following up on its infection.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Coronavirus/immunology , Practice Patterns, Dentists' , Dentists , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Systematic Reviews as Topic
8.
Adv Rheumatol ; 61(1): 60, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of information on the role of chronic use of hydroxychloroquine during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Our aim was to compare the occurrence of COVID-19 between rheumatic disease patients on hydroxychloroquine with individuals from the same household not taking the drug during the first 8 weeks of community viral transmission in Brazil. METHODS: This baseline cross-sectional analysis is part of a 24-week observational multi-center study involving 22 Brazilian academic outpatient centers. All information regarding COVID-19 symptoms, epidemiological, clinical, and demographic data were recorded on a specific web-based platform using telephone calls from physicians and medical students. COVID-19 was defined according to the Brazilian Ministry of Health (BMH) criteria. Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used for statistical analysis and two binary Final Logistic Regression Model by Wald test were developed using a backward-stepwise method for the presence of COVID-19. RESULTS: From March 29th to May 17st, 2020, a total of 10,443 participants were enrolled, including 5166 (53.9%) rheumatic disease patients, of whom 82.5% had systemic erythematosus lupus, 7.8% rheumatoid arthritis, 3.7% Sjögren's syndrome and 0.8% systemic sclerosis. In total, 1822 (19.1%) participants reported flu symptoms within the 30 days prior to enrollment, of which 3.1% fulfilled the BMH criteria, but with no significant difference between rheumatic disease patients (4.03%) and controls (3.25%). After adjustments for multiple confounders, the main risk factor significantly associated with a COVID-19 diagnosis was lung disease (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.03-2.58); and for rheumatic disease patients were diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.19-6.63) and glucocorticoids above 10 mg/ day (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.31-3.19). In addition, a recent influenza vaccination had a protective effect (OR 0.674; 95% CI 0.46-0.98). CONCLUSION: Patients with rheumatic disease on hydroxychloroquine presented a similar occurrence of COVID-19 to household cohabitants, suggesting a lack of any protective role against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC; RBR - 9KTWX6).


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Health/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Sjogren's Syndrome/drug therapy , Statistics, Nonparametric , Young Adult
10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(37): e27228, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434545

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Remdesivir is the only antiviral approved for lower respiratory tract infection produced by SARS-CoV-2. The main objective of this study was to determine the mortality rate, readmissions, mean hospital stay, need for higher levels of oxygen support, and adverse effect-induced abandonment rate in hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and treated with remdesivir (RDSV). The secondary objective was to determine mortality-related risk factors in these patients.The study included a prospective cohort of patients admitted to a third level Spanish hospital between July 5, 2020 and February 3, 2021 for COVID-19 diagnosed by SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction and/or antigen test and treated with RDSV.Remdesivir was received by 185 patients (69.7% males) with a mean age of 62.5 years, median Charlson index of 3 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1-4), and median ambient air oxygen saturation of 91% (IQR: 90-93); 61.6% of patients had hyper-inflammatory syndrome at admission. Median time with symptoms before RDSV treatment was 5 days (IQR: 3-6) and the median hospital stay was 10 days (IQR: 7-15); 19 patients (10.3%) died after a median stay of 13.5 days (IQR: 9.7-24 days), 58 patients (12.9%) were admitted to ICU, 58 (31.4%) needed higher levels of oxygen support, 0.5% abandoned the treatment due to adverse effects, and there were no readmissions. The only mortality-related factor was the need for higher levels of oxygen support (odds ratio 12.02; 95% confidence interval 2.25-64.2).All studied patients were admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of COVID-19 and in respiratory failure, needing initial low-flow oxygen support, and all received RDSV within 1 week of symptom onset. The percent mortality was lower in these patients than was observed in all patients with severe COVID-19 admitted to our center (10.3% vs 20.3%, respectively). Despite receiving RDSV, 1 in 3 patients needed higher levels of oxygen support, the sole mortality-related factor.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Spain , Statistics, Nonparametric
11.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2124650, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412566

ABSTRACT

Importance: Every year, respiratory viruses exact a heavy burden on Canadian hospitals during winter months. Generalizable seasonal patterns of respiratory virus transmission may estimate the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 or other emerging pathogens. Objective: To describe the annual and biennial variation in respiratory virus seasonality in a northern climate. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study is an epidemiological assessment using population-based surveillance of patients with medically attended respiratory tract infection from 2005 through 2017 in Alberta, Canada. Incident cases of respiratory virus infection and infant respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalizations in Alberta were extracted from the Data Integration for Alberta Laboratories platform and Alberta Health Services Discharge Abstract Database, respectively. A deterministic susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible mathematical model with seasonal forcing function was fitted to the data for each virus. The possible future seasonal course of SARS-CoV-2 in northern latitudes was modeled on the basis of these observations. The analysis was conducted between December 15, 2020, and February 10, 2021. Exposures: Seasonal respiratory pathogens. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incidence (temporal pattern) of respiratory virus infections and RSV hospitalizations. Results: A total of 37 719 incident infections with RSV, human metapneumovirus, or human coronaviruses 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 among 35 375 patients (18 069 [51.1%] male; median [interquartile range], 1.29 [0.42-12.2] years) were documented. A susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible model mirrored the epidemiological data, including a striking biennial variation with alternating severe and mild winter peaks. Qualitative description of the model and numerical simulations showed that strong seasonal contact rate and temporary immunity lasting 6 to 12 months were sufficient to explain biennial seasonality in these various respiratory viruses. The seasonality of 10 212 hospitalizations among children younger than 5 years with RSV was also explored. The median (interquartile range) rate of hospitalizations per 1000 live births was 18.6 (17.6-19.9) and 11.0 (10.4-11.7) in alternating even (severe) and odd (less-severe) seasons, respectively (P = .001). The hazard of admission was higher for children born in severe (even) seasons compared with those born in less-severe (odd) seasons (hazard ratio, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.61-1.75; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this modeling study of respiratory viruses in Alberta, Canada, the seasonality followed a pattern estimated by simple mathematical models, which may be informative for anticipating future waves of pandemic SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Seasons , Virus Diseases/diagnosis , Alberta/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Virus Diseases/epidemiology
12.
Cytokine ; 148: 155702, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401408

ABSTRACT

Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are indicated to play a prominent role in mediating the immunopathogenesis of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). Interleukin (IL-37) is one of the anti-inflammatory cytokines that has been proposed to be involved in disease progression but the data are not overwhelming. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to analyze IL-37 levels in serum of 100 patients with severe COVID-19 and 100 blood donors (control group). Median age was significantly higher in COVID-19 cases than in controls. Stratification by gender, body mass index and ABO and Rh blood group systems showed no significant differences between patients and controls. Chronic diseases (cardiovascular and diabetes) were observed in 57.0% of patients. Serum levels of IL-37 and vitamin D were significantly decreased in patients compared to controls. The low level of IL-37 was more pronounced in males, overweight/obese cases, blood group B or AB cases, Rh-positive cases, and cases with no chronic disease. Low producers of IL-37 were more likely to develop COVID-19 (odds ratio = 2.66; 95% confidence interval = 1.51-4.70; corrected probability = 0.015). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that a low serum level of IL-37 was a good predictor of COVID-19. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed that IL-37 and vitamin D were significantly correlated. In conclusion, IL-37 was down-regulated in serum of patients with severe COVID-19 compared to controls. This down-regulation may be associated with an increased risk of disease. Gender, body mass index, blood groups and chronic disease status may also affect IL-37 levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Down-Regulation , Interleukin-1/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Confidence Intervals , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Statistics, Nonparametric
13.
Rev Esp Quimioter ; 33(6): 422-429, 2020 Dec.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390021

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Since the discovery of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR) has become the fundamental method for diagnosing the disease in its acute phase. The objective is to describe the demand-based series of RT-PCR determinations received at a Microbiology Service at a third-level reference hospital for a health area for three months spanning from the onset of the epidemic by SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the total of the RT-PCR requested in the Microbiology Service analyzed from 02/25/2020 to 05/26/2020 (90 days) has been carried out. They have been grouped by epidemiological weeks and by the petitioner service. A descriptive analysis was carried out by age, gender and number of requests for each patient. In the tests carried out, a confidence level of 95% (p <0.05) was considered significant. RESULTS: A total of 27,106 requests was received corresponding to 22,037 patients. Median age 53.7 (RIC 40.9-71.7) years, women: 61.3%. Proportion of patients with any positive RT-PCR: 14%. Of the total requests for RT-PCR, positive 3,710. Week 13 had the highest diagnosis performance (39.0%). The primary care has been the service thar has made the most requests (15,953). Patients with 3 or more RT-PCR: 565, of them, 19 patients had a positive result after previously having a negative one. CONCLUSIONS: Requests have been increasing depending on the evolution of the epidemic. The RT-PCR has a high diagnostic performance in the phases of highest contagiousness and / or transmissibility of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Pandemics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Confidence Intervals , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Young Adult
14.
Rev Esp Quimioter ; 33(6): 444-447, 2020 Dec.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390020

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Co-circulation of the two Influenza B lineages hinders forecast of strain to include in trivalent vaccine. Autonomous Communities such as Cantabria continue without supplying tetravalent vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyse epidemiological characteristics of influenza type B in Cantabria (2019-2020 season) as well as to establish the predominant lineage and its relation to the recommended vaccine. METHODS: Retrospective study whereby flu diagnosis and lineage analysis were determined by RT-PCR. RESULTS: All samples belonged to the Victoria lineage. Most prevalent viral co-infection was due to SARS-CoV-2. The population affected by influenza B was mainly paediatric and non-vaccinated patients more frequently required hospital admittance. CONCLUSIONS: Influenza type B has a higher incidence in the paediatric population and type A affects more the adult population. Only 28.8% of patients with Influenza B that presented with some underlying condition or risk factor were vaccinated. This shows the need to increase coverage with tetravalent vaccines in order to reduce the burden of disease associated with the Influenza B virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza B virus , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Chi-Square Distribution , Child , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Epidemics , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Retrospective Studies , Seasons , Spain/epidemiology , Statistics, Nonparametric
16.
Value Health ; 24(11): 1578-1585, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331016

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are collected throughout healthcare systems and used in clinical, economic, and outcomes studies to direct patient-centered care and inform health policy. Studies have demonstrated increases in stressors unique to the COVID-19 pandemic, however, their effect on HRQOL is unknown. Our study aimed to assess the change in self-reported global health during the pandemic for patients receiving care in a large healthcare system compared with 1 year earlier. METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study of 2 periods was conducted including adult patients who had a healthcare appointment and completed the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health (PROMIS GH) as standard care during the COVID-19 pandemic and a year earlier. The effect of time on PROMIS global mental health (GMH) and global physical health (GPH) was evaluated through multiple statistical methods. RESULTS: There were 38 037 patients (mean age 56.1 ± 16.6 years; 61% female; 87% white) who completed the PROMIS GH during the pandemic (August 2020) and 33 080 (age 56.7 ± 16.5 years; 61% female; 86% white) who had completed it 1 year earlier (August 2019). GMH was significantly worse, whereas GPH was similar during the pandemic compared with a year earlier (adjusted estimate [standard error]: -1.21 (0.08) and 0.11 (0.08) T-score points, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our study found modest, nonclinically meaningful decreases in GMH and similar GPH during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with a year earlier in patients cared for in a large healthcare system. Nevertheless, healthcare systems are likely seeing a biased sample of patients during these times. Findings from our study have implications for the interpretation of HRQOL during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health/standards , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chi-Square Distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Self Report , Statistics, Nonparametric
17.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e102, 2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279797

ABSTRACT

Estimating the lengths-of-stay (LoS) of hospitalised COVID-19 patients is key for predicting the hospital beds' demand and planning mitigation strategies, as overwhelming the healthcare systems has critical consequences for disease mortality. However, accurately mapping the time-to-event of hospital outcomes, such as the LoS in the intensive care unit (ICU), requires understanding patient trajectories while adjusting for covariates and observation bias, such as incomplete data. Standard methods, such as the Kaplan-Meier estimator, require prior assumptions that are untenable given current knowledge. Using real-time surveillance data from the first weeks of the COVID-19 epidemic in Galicia (Spain), we aimed to model the time-to-event and event probabilities of patients' hospitalised, without parametric priors and adjusting for individual covariates. We applied a non-parametric mixture cure model and compared its performance in estimating hospital ward (HW)/ICU LoS to the performances of commonly used methods to estimate survival. We showed that the proposed model outperformed standard approaches, providing more accurate ICU and HW LoS estimates. Finally, we applied our model estimates to simulate COVID-19 hospital demand using a Monte Carlo algorithm. We provided evidence that adjusting for sex, generally overlooked in prediction models, together with age is key for accurately forecasting HW and ICU occupancy, as well as discharge or death outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Forecasting/methods , Length of Stay/trends , Models, Statistical , Age Factors , Bed Occupancy/statistics & numerical data , Bed Occupancy/trends , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitals , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/trends , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Spain/epidemiology , Statistics, Nonparametric , Survival Analysis
18.
J Clin Pharmacol ; 61(11): 1406-1414, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241509

ABSTRACT

Glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed in inflammatory diseases and have recently experienced a boom in the treatment of COVID-19. Small studies have shown an effect of glucocorticoids on inflammatory marker levels, but definitive proof is lacking. We investigated the influence of prednisone on inflammatory biomarkers in a previous multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that compared a 7-day treatment course of 50-mg prednisone to placebo in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We compared levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), leukocyte and neutrophil count between patients with and without glucocorticoid treatment at baseline and on days 3, 5, and 7 and at discharge by Wilcoxon tests and analysis of variance. A total of 356 patient data sets in the prednisone group and 355 in the placebo group were available for analysis. Compared to placebo, use of prednisone was associated with reductions in levels of CRP on days 3, 5, and 7 (mean difference of 46%, P < .001 for each time point). For PCT, no such difference was observed. Leukocyte and neutrophil count were higher in the prednisone group at all time points (mean difference of 27% for leukocytes and 33% for neutrophils, P <.001 for all time points). We conclude that after administration of glucocorticoids in community-acquired pneumonia, patients had lower CRP levels and increased leukocyte and neutrophil count as compared to the placebo group. PCT levels were not different between treatment groups. PCT levels thus may more appropriately mirror the resolution of infection compared to more traditional inflammatory markers.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Community-Acquired Infections , Leukocyte Count/methods , Pneumonia , Prednisone/administration & dosage , Procalcitonin/blood , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , Biomarkers, Pharmacological/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/drug therapy , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Humans , Male , Pneumonia/blood , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Statistics, Nonparametric
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