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1.
Ann N Y Acad Sci ; 1507(1): 70-83, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673249

ABSTRACT

For many years, it was believed that the aging process was inevitable and that age-related diseases could not be prevented or reversed. The geroscience hypothesis, however, posits that aging is, in fact, malleable and, by targeting the hallmarks of biological aging, it is indeed possible to alleviate age-related diseases and dysfunction and extend longevity. This field of geroscience thus aims to prevent the development of multiple disorders with age, thereby extending healthspan, with the reduction of morbidity toward the end of life. Experts in the field have made remarkable advancements in understanding the mechanisms underlying biological aging and identified ways to target aging pathways using both novel agents and repurposed therapies. While geroscience researchers currently face significant barriers in bringing therapies through clinical development, proof-of-concept studies, as well as early-stage clinical trials, are underway to assess the feasibility of drug evaluation and lay a regulatory foundation for future FDA approvals in the future.


Subject(s)
Aging/genetics , Aging/metabolism , Congresses as Topic/trends , Longevity/physiology , Research Report , Autophagy/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Humans , Metabolomics/methods , Metabolomics/trends , Nervous System Diseases/genetics , Nervous System Diseases/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Stem Cell Transplantation/trends
3.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9915927, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376538

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 virus is the cause of the latest pandemic of the 21st century; it is responsible for the development of COVID-19. Within the multiple study models for both the biology and the treatment of SARS-CoV-2, the use of stem cells has been proposed because of their ability to increase the immune response and to repair tissue. Therefore, the objective of this review is to evaluate the role of stem cells against SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 in order to identify their potential as a study model and as a possible therapeutic source against tissue damage caused by this virus. Therefore, the following research question was established: What is the role of stem cells in the study of SARS-CoV-2 and the treatment of COVID-19? MATERIALS AND METHODS: A search was carried out in the electronic databases of PUBMED, Scopus, and ScienceDirect. The following keywords were used: "SARS-CoV-2," "COVID-19," and "STEM CELL," plus independent search strategies with the Boolean operators "OR" and "AND." The identified reports were those whose main objective was the study of stem cells in relation to SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19. For the development of this study, the following inclusion criteria were taken into account: studies whose main objective was the study of stem cells in relation to SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19 and clinical case studies, case reports, clinical trials, pilot studies, in vitro, or in vivo studies. For assessment of the risk of bias for in vitro studies, the SciRAP tool was used. The data collected for each type of study, clinical or in vitro, were analyzed with descriptive statistics using the SPSS V.22 program. RESULTS: Of the total of studies included (n = 39), 22 corresponded to in vitro investigations and 17 to human studies (clinical cases (n = 9), case series (n = 2), pilot clinical trials (n = 5), clinical trials (n = 1)). In vitro studies that induced pluripotent stem cells were the most used (n = 12), and in clinical studies, the umbilical stem cells derived were the most reported (n = 11). The mean age of the study subjects was 58.3 years. After the application of stem cell therapy, the follow-up period was 8 days minimum and 90 days maximum. Discussion. The mechanism by which the virus enters the cell is through protein "S," located on the surface of the membrane, by recognizing the ACE2 receptor located on the target cell. The evidence that the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in stem cells indicates that stem cells from bone marrow and amniotic fluid have very little expression. This shows that stem cell has a low risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSION: The use of stem cells is a highly relevant therapeutic option. It has been shown in both in vitro studies and clinical trials that it counteracts the excessive secretion of cytokines. There are even more studies that focus on long-term follow-up; thus, the potential for major side effects can be analyzed more clearly. Finally, the ethical use of stem cells from fetal or infant origin needs to be regulated. The study was registered in PROSPERO (no. CRD42021229038). The limitations of the study were because of the methodology employed, the sample was not very large, and the follow-up period of the clinical studies was relatively short.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Stem Cells/cytology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Stem Cells/pathology
4.
Natl Med J India ; 34(1): 10-14, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359327

ABSTRACT

Background: . Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) was first described in December 2019 and has evolved into an ongoing global pandemic. Cancer patients on chemotherapy are immunocompromised and are at the highest risk of Covid-19-related complications. We describe our experience with the management of haematology-oncology and stem cell transplant (SCT) patients receiving curative chemotherapy in a hospital with a high influx of Covid-19 patients. Methods: . We did a prospective observational study at a 99-bedded cancer centre of a tertiary care teaching hospital from April 2020 to September 2020. Preventive measures taken were categorized as follows: (i) staff: screening, mandatory use of personal protective equipment (PPE), risk stratification of potential exposure and testing and isolation as needed; (ii) patients: mandatory viral polymerase chain reaction testing, segregation of positive and untested patients and testing of family members; and (iii) environment: mandatory regular cleaning, visitor restriction, telemedicine services and reassignment of priority to clinic visits. Treatment of the underlying conditions was continued with added precautions. Results: . A total of 54 patients were included in the analysis, including 48 with haematological malignancies and 6 for stem cell therapy. Preventive measures were universally applied, and chemotherapy with a curative intent was initiated as per protocol. Three patients were detected to have Covid-19 infection before admission and one after the institution of chemotherapy. Nine patients died after the first cycle of chemotherapy, 2 due to severe Covid-19-related illness and 7 due to complications of chemotherapy or disease progression. Conclusions: . In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, treatment for haematological malignancies must continue while balancing the risk of Covid-19 infections. Our report emphasizes the effectiveness of measures such as hand hygiene, social isolation, patient segregation, use of masks and PPE and universal pre-treatment testing for Covid-19 in reducing the risk of infection in a high-risk clinical setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Infection Control , Risk Management , Stem Cell Transplantation , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Contact Tracing/methods , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , India/epidemiology , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Management/methods , Risk Management/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Stem Cell Transplantation/statistics & numerical data
5.
J Cereb Blood Flow Metab ; 41(10): 2797-2799, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288495

ABSTRACT

The last 50 years have witnessed the translation of stem cell therapy from the laboratory to the clinic for treating brain disorders, in particular stroke. From the focal stereotaxic transplantation to the minimally invasive intravenous and intraarterial delivery, stem cells display the ability to replenish injured cells and to secrete therapeutic molecules, altogether promoting brain repair. The increased stroke incidence in COVID-19 survivors poses as a new disease indication for cell therapy, owing in part to the cells' robust anti-inflammatory properties. Optimization of the cell transplant regimen will ensure the safe and effective clinical application of cell therapy in stroke and relevant neurological disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Stem Cell Transplantation , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/therapy , Animals , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Incidence , Regenerative Medicine/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Stroke/pathology
6.
Cancer Med ; 10(3): 1043-1056, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1001831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The relationship between cancer and COVID-19 has been revealed during the pandemic. Some anticancer treatments have been reported to have negative influences on COVID-19-infected patients while other studies did not support this hypothesis. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in WOS, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CNKI and VIP between Dec 1, 2019 and Sept 23, 2020 for studies on anticancer treatments in patients with COVID-19. Cohort studies involving over 20 patients with cancer were included. The characteristics of the patients and studies, treatment types, mortality, and other additional outcomes were extracted and pooled for synthesis. RRs and forest plots were adopted to present the results. The literature quality and publication bias were assessed using NOS and Egger's test, respectively. RESULTS: We analyzed the data from 29 studies, with 5121 cancer patients with COVID-19 meeting the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences in mortality between patients receiving anticancer treatment and those not (RR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.96-1.43, I2 =66%, p = 0.12). Importantly, in patients with hematological malignancies, chemotherapy could markedly increase the mortality (RR 2.68, 95% CI: 1.90-3.78, I2 =0%, p < 0.00001). In patients with solid tumors, no significant differences in mortality were observed (RR 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.36, I2 =72%, p = 0.67). In addition, our analysis revealed that anticancer therapies had no effects on the ICU admission rate (RR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.70-1.09, I2 =25%, p = 0.23), the severe rate (RR 1.04, 95% CI: 0.95-1.13, I2 =31%, p = 0.42), or respiratory support rate (RR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.70-1.21, I2 =32%, p = 0.55) in COVID-19-infected patients with cancer. Notably, patients receiving surgery had a higher rate of respiratory support than those without any antitumor treatment (RR 1.87, 95%CI: 1.02-3.46, I2 =0%, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: No significant difference was seen in any anticancer treatments in the solid tumor subgroup. Chemotherapy, however, will lead to higher mortality in patients with hematological malignancies. Multicenter, prospective studies are needed to re-evaluate the results.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
7.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(1)2020 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000248

ABSTRACT

The placenta is a temporary organ that is discarded after birth and is one of the most promising sources of various cells and tissues for use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, both in experimental and clinical settings. The placenta has unique, intrinsic features because it plays many roles during gestation: it is formed by cells from two individuals (mother and fetus), contributes to the development and growth of an allogeneic fetus, and has two independent and interacting circulatory systems. Different stem and progenitor cell types can be isolated from the different perinatal tissues making them particularly interesting candidates for use in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. The primary source of perinatal stem cells is cord blood. Cord blood has been a well-known source of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells since 1974. Biobanked cord blood has been used to treat different hematological and immunological disorders for over 30 years. Other perinatal tissues that are routinely discarded as medical waste contain non-hematopoietic cells with potential therapeutic value. Indeed, in advanced perinatal cell therapy trials, mesenchymal stromal cells are the most commonly used. Here, we review one by one the different perinatal tissues and the different perinatal stem cells isolated with their phenotypical characteristics and the preclinical uses of these cells in numerous pathologies. An overview of clinical applications of perinatal derived cells is also described with special emphasis on the clinical trials being carried out to treat COVID19 pneumonia. Furthermore, we describe the use of new technologies in the field of perinatal stem cells and the future directions and challenges of this fascinating and rapidly progressing field of perinatal cells and regenerative medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Placenta/cytology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stem Cell Transplantation/trends , Stem Cells/cytology , Amniotic Fluid/cytology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation/trends , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Drug Carriers , Extraembryonic Membranes/cytology , Female , Forecasting , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/cytology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Macrophage Activation , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Nanoparticles , Pregnancy , Preservation, Biological , Regenerative Medicine/methods , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Stem Cells/immunology
9.
Cell Biol Int ; 44(11): 2182-2191, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695457

ABSTRACT

Since its eruption in China, novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been reported in most of the countries and territories (>200) of the world with ∼18 million confirmed cases (as of August 3, 2020). In most of the countries, COVID-19 upsurge is uncontrolled with a significant mortality rate. Currently, no treatment effective for COVID-19 is available in the form of vaccines or antiviral drugs and patients are currently treated symptomatically. Although the majority of the patients develop mild symptoms and recover without mechanical ventilation for respiratory management, severe respiratory illness develops in a significant portion of affected patients and may result in death. While the scientific community is working to develop vaccines and drugs against the COVID-19 pandemic, novel alternative therapies may reduce the mortality rate. Recent use of stem cells for critically ill COVID-19 patients in a small group of patients in China and subsequent Emergency Use Authorization of stem cells by Food and Drug Administration to Global Institute of Stem Cell Therapy and Research and Athersys has created excitement among the medical community. As a result, several clinical trials have been registered using stem cells for COVID-19 treatment that aim to use different cell sources, dosage, and importantly diverse targeted patient groups. In this brief review, the possibilities of stem cell use in COVID-19 patients and relevant challenges in their use have been discussed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Trials ; 21(1): 520, 2020 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-595058

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and therapeutic effects of allogeneic human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in treating severe pneumonia caused by COVID-19. TRIAL DESIGN: This is a single centre, two arm ratio 1:1, triple blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty serious COVID-19 cases will be enrolled in the trial from April 6th to December 31st 2020. INCLUSION CRITERIA: hospitalised patients at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University satisfy all criteria as below: 1)Adults aged 18-65 years;2)Voluntarily participate in this clinical trial and sign the "informed consent form" or have consent from a legal representative.3)Diagnosed with severe pneumonia of COVID-19: nucleic acid test SARS-CoV-2 positive; respiratory distress (respiratory rate > 30 times / min); hypoxia (resting oxygen saturation < 93% or arterial partial pressure of oxygen / oxygen concentration < 300 mmHg).4)COVID-19 featured lung lesions in chest X-ray image. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients will be excluded from the study if they meet any of the following criteria. 1.Patients have received other experimental treatment for COVID-19 within the last 30 days;2.Patients have severe liver condition (e.g., Child Pugh score >=C or AST> 5 times of the upper limit);3.Patients with severe renal insufficiency (estimated glomerular filtration rate <=30mL / min/1.73 m2) or patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis;4.Patients who are co-infected with HIV, hepatitis B, tuberculosis, influenza virus, adenovirus or other respiratory infection viruses;5.Female patients who have no sexual protection in the last 30 days prior to the screening assessment;6.Pregnant or lactating women or women using estrogen contraception;7.Patients who are planning to become pregnant during the study period or within 6 months after the end of the study period;8.Other conditions that the researchers consider not suitable for participating in this clinical trial. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: There will be two study groups: experimental and control. Both will receive all necessary routine treatment for COVID-19. The experimental group will receive an intravenous injection of dental pulp stem cells suspension (3.0x107 human DPSCs in 30ml saline solution) on day 1, 4 and 7; The control group will receive an equal amount of saline (placebo) on the same days. Clinical and laboratory observations will be performed for analysis during a period of 28 days for each case since the commencement of the study. MAIN OUTCOMES: 1. Primary outcome The primary outcome is Time To Clinical Improvement (TTCI). By definition, TTCI is the time (days) it takes to downgrade two levels from the following six ordered grades [(grade 1) discharge to (grade 6) death] in the clinical state of admission to the start of study treatments (hDPSCs or placebo). Six grades of ordered variables: GradeDescriptionGrade 1:Discharged of patient;Grade 2:Hospitalized without oxygen supplement;Grade 3:Hospitalized, oxygen supplement is required, but NIV / HFNC is not required;Grade 4:Hospitalized in intensive care unit, and NIV / HFNC treatment is required;Grade 5:Hospitalized in intensive care unit, requiring ECMO and/or IMV;Grade 6:Death. ABBREVIATIONS: NIV, non-invasive mechanical ventilation; HFNC, high-flow nasal catheter; IMV, invasive mechanical ventilation. 2. Secondary outcomes 2.1 vital signs: heart rate, blood pressure (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure). During the screening period, hospitalization every day (additional time points of D1, D4, D7 30min before injection, 2h ± 30min, 24h ± 30min after the injection) and follow-up period D90 ± 3 days. 2.2 Laboratory examinations: during the screening period, 30 minutes before D1, D4, D7 infusion, 2h ± 30min, 24h ± 30min after the end of infusion, D10, D14, D28 during hospitalization or discharge day and follow-up period D90 ± 3 days. 2.3 Blood routine: white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils Acidic granulocyte count, basophil count, red blood cell, hemoglobin, hematocrit, average volume of red blood cells, average red blood cell Hb content, average red blood cell Hb concentration, RDW standard deviation, RDW coefficient of variation, platelet count, platelet specific platelet average Volume, platelet distribution width,% of large platelets; 2.4 Liver and kidney function tests: alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyl transferase, prealbumin, total protein, albumin, globulin, white / globule ratio , Total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, cholinesterase, urea, creatinine, total carbon dioxide, uric acid glucose, potassium, sodium, chlorine, calcium, corrected calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium and phosphorus product, anion gap, penetration Pressure, total cholesterol, triacylglycerol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, Low density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein a, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, estimated glomerular filtration rate. 2.5 Inflammation indicators: hypersensitive C-reactive protein, serum amyloid (SAA); 2.6 Infectious disease testing: Hepatitis B (HBsAg, HBsAb, HBeAg, HBeAb, HBcAb), Hepatitis C (Anti-HCV), AIDS (HIVcombin), syphilis (Anti-TP), cytomegalovirus CMV-IgM, cytomegalovirus CMV-IgG; only during the screening period and follow-up period D90 ± 3. 2.7 Immunological testing: Collect peripheral blood to detect the phenotype of T lymphocyte, B lymphocyte, natural killer cell, Macrophage and neutrophil by using flow cytometry. Collect peripheral blood to detect the gene profile of mononuclear cells by using single-cell analyses. Collect peripheral blood serum to detect various immunoglobulin changes: IgA, IgG, IgM, total IgE; Collect peripheral blood serum to explore the changes of cytokines, Th1 cytokines (IL-1 ß, IL-2, TNF-a, ITN-γ), Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL -10). 2.8 Pregnancy test: blood ß-HCG, female subjects before menopause are examined during the screening period and follow-up period D90 ± 3. 2.9 Urine routine: color, clarity, urine sugar, bilirubin, ketone bodies, specific gravity, pH, urobilinogen, nitrite, protein, occult blood, leukocyte enzymes, red blood cells, white blood cells, epithelial cells, non-squamous epithelial cells , Transparent cast, pathological cast, crystal, fungus; 2.10 Stool Routine: color, traits, white blood cells, red blood cells, fat globules, eggs of parasites, fungi, occult blood (chemical method), occult blood (immune method), transferrin (2h ± 30min after the injection and not detected after discharge). RANDOMIZATION: Block randomization method will be applied by computer to allocate the participants into experimental and control groups. The random ratio is 1:1. BLINDING (MASKING): Participants, outcomes assessors and investigators (including personnel in laboratory and imaging department who issue the sample report or image observations) will be blinded. Injections of cell suspension and saline will be coded in accordance with the patient's randomisation group. The blind strategy is kept by an investigator who does not deliver the medical care or assess primary outcome results. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMIZED (SAMPLE SIZE): Twenty participants will be randomized to the experimental and control groups (10 per group). TRIAL STATUS: Protocol version number, hDPSC-CoVID-2019-02-2020 Version 2.0, March 13, 2020. Patients screening commenced on 16th April and an estimated date of the recruitment of the final participants will be around end of July. . TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registration: World Health Organization Trial Registry: ChiCTR2000031319; March 27,2020. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04336254; April 7, 2020 Other Study ID Numbers: hDPSC-CoVID-2019-02-2020 FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Dental Pulp/cytology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Transplantation, Homologous , Young Adult
12.
Cell Stem Cell ; 26(6): 806-810, 2020 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-526598

ABSTRACT

In the midst of a global public health emergency, some businesses are taking advantage of widespread fears by marketing purported stem cell treatments for COVID-19. Such businesses target prospective clients with misleading claims, expose patients to potentially risky stem cell-based products, and undermine efforts to develop evidence-based treatments for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Marketing , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Commerce , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Fear , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stem Cell Transplantation/economics
13.
Intern Med J ; 50(6): 667-679, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-271531

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses a unique challenge to the care of patients with haematological malignancies. Viral pneumonia is known to cause disproportionately severe disease in patients with cancer, and patients with lymphoma, myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia are likely to be at particular risk of severe disease related to COVID-19. This statement has been developed by consensus among authors from Australia and New Zealand. We aim to provide supportive guidance to clinicians making individual patient decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular during periods that access to healthcare resources may be limited. General recommendations include those to minimise patient exposure to COVID-19, including the use of telehealth, avoidance of non-essential visits and minimisation of time spent by patients in infusion suites and other clinical areas. This statement also provides recommendations where appropriate in assessing indications for therapy, reducing therapy-associated immunosuppression and reducing healthcare utilisation in patients with specific haematological malignancies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific decisions regarding therapy of haematological malignancies will need to be individualised, based on disease risk, risks of immunosuppression, rates of community transmission of COVID-19 and available local healthcare resources.


Subject(s)
Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/physiopathology , Lymphoma/physiopathology , Multiple Myeloma/physiopathology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Australia , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Therapy , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/immunology , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/therapy , Lymphoma/immunology , Lymphoma/therapy , Multiple Myeloma/immunology , Multiple Myeloma/therapy , New Zealand , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Salvage Therapy/methods , Stem Cell Transplantation/methods
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