Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
N Engl J Med ; 385(24): 2264-2270, 2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560911

ABSTRACT

Inherited junctional epidermolysis bullosa is a severe genetic skin disease that leads to epidermal loss caused by structural and mechanical fragility of the integuments. There is no established cure for junctional epidermolysis bullosa. We previously reported that genetically corrected autologous epidermal cultures regenerated almost an entire, fully functional epidermis on a child who had a devastating form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. We now report long-term clinical outcomes in this patient. (Funded by POR FESR 2014-2020 - Regione Emilia-Romagna and others.).


Subject(s)
Epidermis/transplantation , Epidermolysis Bullosa, Junctional/therapy , Keratinocytes/transplantation , Transduction, Genetic , Transgenes , Cell Self Renewal , Cells, Cultured/transplantation , Child , Clone Cells , Epidermis/pathology , Epidermolysis Bullosa, Junctional/genetics , Epidermolysis Bullosa, Junctional/pathology , Follow-Up Studies , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/pathology , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/therapy , Genetic Therapy , Genetic Vectors , Humans , Keratinocytes/cytology , Keratinocytes/physiology , Male , Regeneration , Stem Cells/physiology , Transplantation, Autologous
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488617

ABSTRACT

Since the COVID-19 outbreak was acknowledged by the WHO on 30 January 2020, much research has been conducted to unveil various features of the responsible SARS-CoV-2 virus. Different rates of contagion in adults, children, and pregnant women may guide us to understand the underlying infection conditions of COVID-19. In this study, we first provide a review of recent reports of COVID-19 clinical outcomes in children and pregnant women. We then suggest a mechanism that explains the curious case of COVID-19 in children/pregnant women. The unique stem cell molecular signature, as well as the very low expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and the lower ACE/ACE2 ratio in stem cells of children/pregnant women compared to adults might be the cause of milder symptoms of COVID-19 in them. This study provides the main molecular keys on how stem cells can function properly and exert their immunomodulatory and regenerative effects in COVID-19-infected children/pregnant women, while failing to replicate their role in adults. This can lay the groundwork for both predicting the pattern of spread and severity of the symptoms in a population and designing novel stem cell-based treatment and prevention strategies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Stem Cells/physiology , Adult , Age of Onset , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Development ; 148(12)2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282286

ABSTRACT

The third 'Symposium for the Next Generation of Stem Cell Research' (SY-Stem) was held virtually on 3-5 March 2021, having been cancelled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As in previous years, the meeting highlighted the work of early career researchers, ranging from postgraduate students to young group leaders working in developmental and stem cell biology. Here, we summarize the excellent work presented at the Symposium, which covered topics ranging from pluripotency, species-specific aspects of development and emerging technologies, through to organoids, single-cell technology and clinical applications.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic/organization & administration , Inventions/trends , Stem Cell Research , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Differentiation , Congresses as Topic/history , Congresses as Topic/trends , History, 21st Century , Humans , Internet , Inventions/history , Online Systems , Pandemics , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Single-Cell Analysis/trends , Stem Cell Research/history , Stem Cells/physiology , Tissue Culture Techniques/methods , Tissue Culture Techniques/trends
4.
Curr Mol Med ; 21(6): 441-456, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934391

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an extremely pathogenic virus belonging to the family of Coronaviridae. First identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019 after an epidemiological investigation of an emerging cluster of pneumonia of unknown etiology, SARS-CoV-2 was declared the cause of a pandemic on March 11 by the World Health Organization (WHO), pointing to the over 118000 cases of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in over 110 countries. Despite the promising results of drug repositioning studies in the treatment of COVID-19, the evidence of their safety and efficacy remains inconclusive. Cell based therapy has been proven safe and possibly effective in treating multiple lung injuries and diseases, but its potential use in the treatment of COVID-19 has not been yet elucidated. Our aim in this review is to provide an overview of the immunomodulatory effect and the regenerative capacity of stem cells and their secretome in the treatment of many diseases including lung injuries. Those findings may contribute to a better understanding of the potential of stem cell therapy in SARS-CoV-2 infection and its potential use in order to find a solution for this healthcare crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/etiology , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy/methods , Stem Cells/physiology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunomodulation , Lung Injury/immunology , Lung Injury/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Stem Cell Transplantation
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL