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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911362

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is a well-known fact that the information obtained from a survey can be used in a healthcare organizational analysis; however, it is very difficult to compare the different results found in the literature to each other, even through the use of metanalysis, as the methodology is often not consistent. METHODS: Data from a survey analyzing the organizational and managerial responses adopted in pathology-specific clinical pathways (CPs) during the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic were used for constructing a decisional matrix, a tool called SPRIS system, consisting of four different sheets. The first sheet reports the results of the survey and, using a streetlight color system, identifies strengths and weaknesses; the second one, by assigning a priority score, establishes the priority of intervention on each of the strengths and weaknesses identified; the third sheet reports the subjective items of the questionnaire in order to identify threats and opportunities and their probability of happening; in the last sheet, a SWOT Analysis is used to calculate the performance index of the whole organization. RESULTS: The SPRIS system, applied to data concerning the adaptation of four CPs to the COVID-19 pandemic, showed that, whereas all the CPs had a good performance index, some concerns remained unsolved and need be addressed. CONCLUSIONS: The SPRIS system showed to be an easily constructed tool that is able to give an overview of the organization analyzed by the survey and to produce an index that can be used in a direct quality comparison between different services or organizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Strategic Planning , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Pathways , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Perspect Public Health ; 142(3): 142-144, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854725
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(2): e33149, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613479

ABSTRACT

In the Czech Republic, the strategic data-based and organizational support for individual regions and for providers of acute care at the nationwide level is coordinated by the Ministry of Health. At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the country needed to very quickly implement a system for the monitoring, reporting, and overall management of hospital capacities. The aim of this viewpoint is to describe the purpose and basic functions of a web-based application named "Control Centre for Intensive Care," which was developed and made available to meet the needs of systematic online technical support for the management of intensive inpatient care across the Czech Republic during the first wave of the pandemic in spring 2020. Two tools of key importance are described in the context of national methodology: one module for regular online updates and overall monitoring of currently free capacities of intensive care in real time, and a second module for online entering and overall record-keeping of requirements on medications for COVID-19 patients. A total of 134 intensive care providers and 927 users from hospitals across all 14 regions of the Czech Republic were registered in the central Control Centre for Intensive Care database as of March 31, 2021. This web-based application enabled continuous monitoring and decision-making during the mass surge of critical care from autumn 2020 to spring 2021. The Control Center for Intensive Care has become an indispensable part of a set of online tools that are employed on a regular basis for crisis management at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Critical Care , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Strategic Planning
4.
Movimento (Porto Alegre) ; 27: e27060, 2021. tab
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1609159

ABSTRACT

Resumo Monitorar e analisar a execução das metas pactuadas no Planejamento Estratégico da Escola de Educação Física da Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, nos 18 primeiros meses de implementação. Realizaram-se 15 entrevistas semiestruturadas com 12 mentores e três discentes que ocupam representações estudantis. Utilizou-se análise de conteúdo, possibilitando delineamento de quatro categorias: a) resultados preliminares obtidos; b) potencialidades do instrumento; c) barreiras e enfrentamentos; d) propostas de aperfeiçoamento. Observou-se que a maioria das metas teve ações norteadoras iniciadas, mas nenhuma concluída. Ressalta-se que o contexto da pandemia mundial (covid-19) exerceu significativo impacto, interferindo diretamente nos resultados. O estudo apresenta caráter de monitoramento em relação à ferramenta de gestão, tendo em vista a relevância de implementar mecanismos para avaliação sistematizada dos indicadores de desempenho institucionais. Espera-se que as potencialidades percebidas sejam fortalecidas, as barreiras sejam superadas e as propostas de aperfeiçoamento sejam discutidas coletivamente com a finalidade do desenvolvimento da instituição.


Abstract This study monitored and analyzed the achievement goals agreed under the Strategic Planning for Physical Education School at Federal University of Ouro Preto during 18 months of implementation. Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 mentors and 3 student representatives. Content analysis was used, resulting in four categories: a) preliminary results obtained; b) instrument capabilities; c) barriers and confrontations; d) improvement proposals. Actions to achieve most goals had been initiated, but none was completed. The global pandemic context (COVID-19) had a significant impact on the results. The study monitored the management tool, considering the importance of implementing mechanisms for systematic evaluation of institutional performance indicators. It is expected that the perceived potential will be strengthened, barriers will be overcome, and proposals for improvement will be collectively discussed to develop the institution.


Resumen Monitorear y analizar la ejecución de las metas pactadas en la Planificación Estratégica de la Escuela de Educación Física de la Universidad Federal de Ouro Preto, en los 18 primeros meses de implementación. Se realizaron 15 entrevistas semiestructuradas con 12 mentores y tres estudiantes representantes estudiantiles. Se utilizo el análisis de contenido, lo que posibilitó delinear cuatro categorías: a) resultados preliminares obtenidos; b) potencial del instrumento; c) barreras y enfrentamientos; d) propuestas de mejora. Se observó que la mayoría de las metas tenían acciones iniciadas, pero ninguna concluida. Es de destacar que el contexto de pandemia mundial (COVID-19) tuvo un impacto significativo sobre los resultados. El estudio presenta un carácter de monitoreo en relación a la herramienta de gestión, considerando la relevancia de implementar mecanismos para la evaluación sistematizada de los indicadores de desempeño institucionales. Se espera que se fortalezca el potencial percibido, se superen barreras y se discutan colectivamente propuestas de mejora con el objetivo de desarrollar la institución.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Schools , Universities , Strategic Planning , COVID-19 , Environmental Monitoring , Pandemics
5.
Eval Program Plann ; 89: 101985, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347602

ABSTRACT

Data are the lifeblood of decision-making and provide a critical component into the complex mosaic from which decisions emerge. Evaluators and decision-makers should, therefore, continuously seek to explore the use of tools that can produce more meaningful, insightful, and useful data so that decision-making can be enhanced and improved. Traditional economic appraisal methods offer much and are very useful and relevant. Standard financial accounting reporting for tax purposes also provide insightful information on the organization's financial health and that of its individual programs. However, neither offer insight into cost behavior-an important consideration for making program operations more efficient and for long-term strategic planning, forecasting, and design of program operations. Before COVID-19, programs were already challenged with competition for donor dollars and the pursuit for financial sustainability. The COVID-19 environment has considerably exacerbated these challenges. In this current environment, it is more important than ever for nonprofits to optimize limited financial resources to do more societal good. This paper will illustrate how selected concepts from cost and management accounting can be used by both independent program evaluators to improve their recommendations, as well as program administrators in-charge of nonprofits to enhance decision-making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Strategic Planning , Humans , Organizations, Nonprofit , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2
6.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(5): e2110090, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227702

ABSTRACT

Importance: Reimagining university life during COVID-19 requires substantial innovation and meaningful community input. One method for obtaining community input is crowdsourcing, which involves having a group of individuals work to solve a problem and then publicly share solutions. Objective: To evaluate a crowdsourcing open call as an approach to COVID-19 university community engagement and strategic planning. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study assessed a crowdsourcing open call offered from June 16 to July 16, 2020, that sought ideas to inform safety in the fall 2020 semester at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). Digital methods (email and social media) were used for promotion, and submissions were collected online for 4 weeks. Participation was open to UNC students, staff, faculty, and others. Main Outcomes and Measures: Submissions were evaluated for innovation, feasibility, inclusivity, and potential to improve safety and well-being. Demographic data were collected from submitting individuals, and submissions were qualitatively analyzed for emergent themes on challenges with and solutions for addressing safety and well-being in the fall semester. Data were shared with UNC leadership to inform decision-making. Results: The open call received 82 submissions from 110 participants, including current UNC students (56 submissions [68%]), people younger than 30 years (67 [82%]), women (55 [67%]), and individuals identifying as a racial/ethnic minority or as multiracial/ethnic (49 [60%]). Seven submissions were identified as finalists and received cash prizes with the encouragement to use these funds toward idea development and implementation. Seventeen runner-up teams were linked to university resources for further development. Thematic analysis of submissions regarding challenges with the fall semester revealed not only physical health concerns and the limitations of remote learning but also challenges that have been exacerbated by the pandemic, such as a lack of mental health support, structural racism and inequality, and insufficient public transportation. Solutions included novel ideas to support mental health among specific populations (eg, graduate students and racial/ethnic minorities), improve health equity, and increase transit access. All 24 finalists and runners-up indicated interest in implementation after being notified of the open call results. Conclusions and Relevance: This study suggests that open calls are a feasible strategy for university community engagement on COVID-19, providing a stakeholder-driven approach to identifying promising ideas for enhancing safety and well-being. Open calls could be formally incorporated into university planning processes to develop COVID-19 safety strategies that are responsive to diverse community members' concerns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Crowdsourcing , Organizational Innovation , Strategic Planning , Universities/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Education, Distance , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Minority Groups/psychology , North Carolina , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Students/psychology , Young Adult
7.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(15): e25495, 2021 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180673

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: While the new Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic rapidly spread across the world, South America was reached later in relation to Asia, Europe and the United States of America (USA). Brazil concentrates now the largest number of cases in the continent and, as the disease speedily progressed throughout the country, prompt and challenging operational strategies had to be taken by institutions caring for COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients in order to assure optimal workflows, triage, and management. Although hospitals in the USA, Europe and Asia have shared their experience on this subject, little has been discussed about such strategies in South America or by the perspective of outpatient centers, which are paramount in the radiology field. This article shares the guidelines adopted early in the pandemic by a nationwide outpatient healthcare center composed by a network of more than 200 patient service centers and nearly 2,000 radiologists in Brazil, discussing operational and patient management strategies, staff protection, changes adopted in the fellowship program, and the effectiveness of such measures.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 , Change Management , Civil Defense , Critical Pathways , Strategic Planning , Technology, Radiologic , Ambulatory Care/methods , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Civil Defense/statistics & numerical data , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Critical Pathways/trends , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Strategic Planning/standards , Strategic Planning/statistics & numerical data , Technology, Radiologic/methods , Technology, Radiologic/organization & administration , Technology, Radiologic/statistics & numerical data
8.
Indian J Tuberc ; 67(4S): S101-S106, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124936

ABSTRACT

Case finding, an important parameter in fight against Tuberculosis (TB) has always remained a challenge despite advances in diagnostic modalities, access to health care and administrative commitment. We are still far from reaching the goals so set as per End TB Strategy and National Strategic Plan 2017-2025, and case finding is of paramount importance for achieving the said targets. This article, after identifying the obstacles faced in case finding, explores the various case finding strategies in the perspective of diagnostics, feasibility, resource utilization and current recommendations. Need for prioritization of case finding in different settings with involvement and active participation of one and all has been discussed. Role of health education in an individual, general public and health care worker in the context of case finding has been highlighted. Research areas to strengthen case finding have been enumerated. The review concludes by bringing out the need for heightened efforts for case finding in TB as the resources are significantly diverted as the world is facing the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Strategic Planning , Tuberculosis/therapy
9.
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs ; 38(3): 176-184, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122240

ABSTRACT

Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) first reached the United States in January 2020. Located in New York City (NYC), MSK Kids, at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center services, is one of the largest pediatric cancer centers in the U.S., caring for children, teenagers, and young adults with cancer, immune deficiencies, and blood disorders. Methods: Implementation for infection mitigation and ongoing care of patients included: (1) the creation of a strategic planning team of physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, and administrators to develop guidance and workflows, (2) continuous reassessment of patients' needs for hospital services and visit frequency, (3) the use of telemedicine to replace in-person visits, (4) the use of satellite regional centers to manage patients living outside NYC, (5) pre-screening of patients prior to visits for risks and symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, (6) day-of-service screening for risks or symptoms of COVID-19 infection, (7) surveillance testing of children and their caregivers, and (8) creation of cohort plans for the management of COVID-19 positive and uninfected patients within the same institution, in both the outpatient and inpatient settings. Results: We describe the timeline for planning mitigation during the first weeks of the pandemic, and detail in a stepwise fashion the rationale and implementation of COVID-19 containment efforts in the context of a large pediatric oncology program. Discussion: Our experience offers a model on which to base strategic planning efforts at other pediatric oncology centers, for continued preparedness to combat the threat posed by SARS-CoV-2 worldwide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Neoplasms/therapy , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Strategic Planning , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Lab Med ; 52(5): 420-425, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990756

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a major toll on the economy and funding for public education. For that reason, the pandemic has a worrisome effect on the sustainability of university/college based Medical Laboratory Sciences MLS training programs. Stakeholders of university-based MLS programs include university administrators, students, clinical affiliates and faculty. Each group has specific goals and challenges that affect the sustainability of the program. This report details strategies that can be used to satisfy the goals specific to key stakeholders that lead to sustainability. These strategies apply in pandemic times and in the back-to-normal future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Medical Laboratory Science/economics , Program Evaluation/economics , Strategic Planning , Universities/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty/organization & administration , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Medical Laboratory Science/trends , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stakeholder Participation
13.
J Korean Med Sci ; 35(45): e396, 2020 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940698

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak in Wuhan, China, a total of 637 patients had been diagnosed with the disease in Seoul as of May 2, 2020. Our study aimed to describe the impact of the 3T strategies (preemptive testing, prompt tracing and proper treatment) on the epidemiological characteristics of COVID-19 in Seoul. METHODS: The descriptive and explanatory analysis was carried out on critical indicators such as epidemiological characteristics and key duration of patient status change from January 24 to May 2 in Seoul before and after preemptive testing for patients under investigation associated with COVID-19 clusters. RESULTS: Preemptive testing increased the positive test rate (3.9% to 4.2%), an asymptomatic case at diagnosis (16.9% to 30.6%), and reduced the time from symptom onset to quarantine (4.0 to 3.0 days). Prompt tracing decreased unknown sources of infection (6.9% to 2.8%), the mean number of contacts (32.2 to 23.6), and the time-varying reproduction number R(t) (1.3 to 0.6). With proper treatment, only 2 cases of mortality occurred, resulting in a fatality rate of just 0.3%. CONCLUSION: In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic lasting 100 days, the effect of the 3T strategies flattened the curve and decreased the time during which infected individuals were contagious, thereby lowering the R(t) below 1 in Seoul.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Strategic Planning , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Contact Tracing , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time-to-Treatment , Young Adult
14.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(3): 681-686, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-937397

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has had unprecedented negative effects on global health and economies, drawing attention and resources from many other public health services. To minimize negative effects, the parallels, lessons, and resources from existing public health programs need to be identified and used. Often underappreciated synergies relating to COVID-19 are with tuberculosis (TB). COVID-19 and TB share commonalities in transmission and public health response: case finding, contact identification, and evaluation. Data supporting interventions for either disease are, understandably, vastly different, given the diseases' different histories. However, many of the evolving issues affecting these diseases are increasingly similar. As previously done for TB, all aspects of congregate investigations and preventive and therapeutic measures for COVID-19 must be prospectively studied for optimal evidence-based interventions. New attention garnered by the pandemic can ensure that knowledge and investment can benefit both COVID-19 response and traditional public health programs such as TB programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health , Humans , Preventive Health Services , Strategic Planning
15.
Esc. Anna Nery Rev. Enferm ; 24(spe): e20200188, 20200000.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-781729

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: Refletir acerca da gestão em saúde do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS), na perspectiva de desafios e possibilidades para superar lacunas de coordenação no enfrentamento da COVID-19. Método: Trata-se de estudo reflexivo, fundamentado na formulação discursiva sobre a gestão em saúde no SUS organizado nas seguintes seções: introdução com a contextualização da temática, macrodesafios no âmbito do SUS na coordenação da atenção à saúde no enfrentamento da COVID-19, aspectos para subsidiar ações de coordenação da gestão e considerações finais. Resultados: Constatam-se desafios na coordenação entre os entes federativos, de financiamento, de consolidação da vigilância em saúde, da regulação, da capacidade instalada e gestão de pessoas que remetem à importância de estabelecer estratégias para o fortalecimento do SUS, principalmente, na coordenação da gestão em saúde. Conclusões e implicações para a prática: Destaca-se a relevância da autoridade da gestão regulatória no SUS para a coordenação e sua potencialidade de organização em prover melhores condições de atenção, porém, entende-se que é necessário revistar a territorialidade, o planejamento e o processo de trabalho, como elementos constituintes da vigilância em saúde.


Objective: to reflect on the Unified Health System (SUS) health management, from the perspective of challenges and possibilities to overcome coordination gaps in facing COVID-19. Method: this is a reflective study, based on the discursive formulation on health management in SUS organized in the following sections: an introduction with the context of the theme, macro challenges in the scope of SUS in the coordination of health care in facing COVID-19, aspects of supporting management oordination actions and final considerations. Results: there are challenges in the coordination among federal entities, financing, consolidation of health surveillance, regulation, installed capacity, and in the management of people who refer to the importance of establishing strategies to strengthen SUS, mainly in the coordination of healthcare management. Conclusions and implications for practice: the relevance of the regulatory management authority in SUS for coordination and its organizational potential in providing better care conditions is highlighted, but it is understood that it is necessary to review the territoriality, planning, and work process, as constituent elements of health surveillance.


Objetivo: reflexionar sobre la gestión de la salud del Sistema Único de Salud (SUS), desde la perspectiva de los retos y posibilidades de superar las lagunas de coordinación en el enfrentamiento a la COVID-19. Método: Se trata de un estudio reflexivo, basado en la formulación discursiva sobre la gestión de la salud en el SUS organizada en las siguientes secciones: introducción con la contextualización del tema, macro retos en el ámbito del SUS en la coordinación de la atención de la salud para el enfrentamiento a la COVID-19, aspectos para apoyar las acciones de coordinación de la gestión y onsideraciones finales. Resultados: existen desafíos en la coordinación entre las entidades federales, el financiamiento, la consolidación de la vigilancia de la salud, la regulación, la capacidad instalada y la gestión de las personas que se refieren a la importancia de establecer estrategias para fortalecer el SUS principalmente en la coordinación de la gestión en salud. Conclusiones e implicaciones para la práctica: Se destaca la relevancia de la autoridad de gestión reguladora en el SUS para la coordinación y su potencial organizativo para proporcionar mejores condiciones de atención, aunque se entiende que es necesario revisar la territorialidad, la planificación y el proceso de trabajo, como elementos constitutivos de la vigilancia de la salud.


Subject(s)
Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Unified Health System/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Management , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Personnel Management , Strategic Planning , Brazil/epidemiology , Budgets/organization & administration , Health Strategies , Delivery of Health Care , Public Health Surveillance
17.
Nurs Forum ; 55(4): 687-694, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690325

ABSTRACT

An organizational culture that values diversity and inclusion is essential for the achievement of high-quality nursing education, yet little literature exists to guide schools of nursing (SON) in accomplishing this goal. All SONs, regardless of size, need a framework that provides specific steps for developing and nurturing a culture that values diversity and inclusion. Using our SON as an exemplar, the goal of this article was to (a) review the barriers we faced when building a diverse and inclusive environment, (b) share our school's strategic plan designed to promote diversity and inclusion, and (c) highlight successful strategies as part of the development and ongoing implementation of our school's strategic plan. This process requires continuous commitment and intentionality as well as flexibility to address unforeseen circumstances. For example, the goals we have adopted and the strategies we have put in place have allowed members of our SON community to acknowledge and address the urgency and validity of the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as the disproportionate impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on racial and ethnic minority groups. Although we recognize that we still have work to do within our SON community, we believe our exemplar offers an action-oriented framework for increasing diversity and inclusion among students, faculty, staff, and leadership in SONs.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Organizational Culture , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Faculty, Nursing/standards , Faculty, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Leadership , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Racism/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Strategic Planning , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data
18.
Am J Emerg Med ; 38(10): 2130-2133, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-654523

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) published a national strategic plan for COVID-19, which provides general guidelines yet leaves logistical details for institutions to determine. Key capabilities from this plan provided a crucial foundation for a 16-day Emergency Department (ED) surge planning process at one pediatric institution. This paper describes critical milestones and lessons learned during this brief period, including derivation of criteria for ED surge activation, a full-scale surge drill, and the resultant ED surge protocol. The framework of real-time evaluation was used throughout the planning process and involved constant and iterative synthesis of real-time feedback from multidisciplinary stakeholders for responsive decision-making. Ultimately, the objective of this paper is to provide timely and readily actionable information to other institutions seeking guidance to apply the ACEP strategic plan for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Strategic Planning , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Strategic Stockpile
19.
Emerg Med J ; 37(9): 567-570, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647095

ABSTRACT

For many of us in emergency medicine, rising to the challenge of the COVID-19 crisis will be the single most exciting and challenging episode of our careers. Lessons have been learnt on how to make quick and effective changes without being hindered by the normal restraints of bureaucracy. Changes that would normally have taken months to years to implement have been successfully introduced over a period of several weeks. Although we have managed these changes largely by command and control, compassionate leadership has identified leaders within our team and paved the way for the future. This article covers the preparation and changes made in response to COVID-19 in a London teaching hospital.


Subject(s)
Civil Defense , Coronavirus Infections , Emergency Service, Hospital , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Strategic Planning , Surge Capacity , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Change Management , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Efficiency, Organizational , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Humans , Leadership , London , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
20.
EMBO Mol Med ; 12(6): e12634, 2020 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197868

ABSTRACT

Current demand for SARS-CoV-2 testing is straining material resource and labor capacity around the globe. As a result, the public health and clinical community are hindered in their ability to monitor and contain the spread of COVID-19. Despite broad consensus that more testing is needed, pragmatic guidance toward realizing this objective has been limited. This paper addresses this limitation by proposing a novel and geographically agnostic framework (the 4Ps framework) to guide multidisciplinary, scalable, resource-efficient, and achievable efforts toward enhanced testing capacity. The 4Ps (Prioritize, Propagate, Partition, and Provide) are described in terms of specific opportunities to enhance the volume, diversity, characterization, and implementation of SARS-CoV-2 testing to benefit public health. Coordinated deployment of the strategic and tactical recommendations described in this framework has the potential to rapidly expand available testing capacity, improve public health decision-making in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and/or to be applied in future emergent disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Global Health , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Strategic Planning
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