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1.
J Dual Diagn ; 17(3): 181-192, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393102

ABSTRACT

Mobile mental health apps can help bridge gaps in access to care for those with substance use disorders and dual diagnoses. The authors describe a portfolio of free, publicly available mobile mental health apps developed by the National Center for PTSD. The authors also demonstrate how this suite of primarily non-substance use disorder-specific mobile mental health apps may support the active ingredients of substance use disorder treatment or be used for self-management of substance use disorder and related issues. The potential advantages of these apps, as well as limitations and considerations for future app development, are discussed.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Self-Management , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Substance-Related Disorders , Humans , Mental Health , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy
3.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 54(2): 86-95, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181670

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study investigated associations between perceptions of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in workers at hospitals designated to treat COVID-19, as well as the difference in the magnitude of these associations by occupational type and previous Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) experience. METHODS: The participants were workers at hospitals designated to treat COVID-19 who completed a questionnaire about their perceptions related to COVID-19, work experience during the previous MERS-CoV outbreak, and symptoms of PTSD ascertained by the PTSD Checklist for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Participants' characteristics were compared using the chi-square test. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate the associations between perceptions and the prevalence of PTSD, stratified by occupational type and previous MERS-CoV experience. RESULTS: Non-medical personnel showed stronger associations with PTSD than medical personnel according to general fear (odds ratio [OR], 6.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92 to 23.20), shortages of supplies (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.56), and issue-specific fear (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.59). Those with prior MERS-CoV quarantine experience were more prone to PTSD than those without such experience in terms of general fear (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.37), shortages of supplies (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.40), and issue-specific fear (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.38). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, non-medical personnel tended to have higher odds of being categorized as having PTSD. Workers with prior MERS-CoV experience were more susceptible than those without such experience. These findings suggest the need for timely interventions to manage human resources for a sustainable quarantine system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Health Personnel , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Perception , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Occupations , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
4.
J Psychosom Res ; 143: 110399, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085518

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the mental health outcomes of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The aims of the study were: (1) to examine the trajectories of anxiety, depression, and pandemic-related stress factors (PRSF) of COVID-19 hospitalized patients one-month following hospitalization; (2) to assess the presence of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) a month after hospitalization; (3) to identify baseline risk and protective factors that would predict PTSS one month after hospitalization. METHODS: We contacted hospitalized COVID-19 patients (n = 64) by phone, at three time-points: during the first days after admission to the hospital (T1); after ~two weeks from the beginning of hospitalization (T2), and one month after hospitalization (T3). At all time-points we assessed the levels of anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as PRSF. At T3, PTSS were assessed. RESULTS: The levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms decreased one-month following hospitalization. Moreover, higher levels of anxiety (standardized ß = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.81-1.49, p < 0.001) and depression (ß = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.63-1.31 p < 0.001) symptoms during the first week of hospitalization, feeling socially disconnected (ß = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37-0.81 p < 0.001) and experiencing a longer hospitalization period (ß = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.03-0.47 p = 0.026) predicted higher PTSS scores a month post-hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: We identified early hospitalization risk factors for the development of PTSS one month after hospitalization that should be targeted to reduce the risk for PTSS.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/psychology , Hospitalization , Inpatients/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/complications , COVID-19/complications , Depression/complications , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Symptom Assessment
5.
J Neurovirol ; 27(1): 154-159, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059492

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-COV-2 becomes a global pandemic, many researchers have a concern about the long COVID-19 complications. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a persistent, debilitating, and unexplained fatigue disorder. We investigated psychological morbidities such as CFS and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among survivors of COVID-19 over 6 months. All COVID-19 survivors from the university-affiliated hospital of Tehran, Iran, were assessed 6 months after infection onset by a previously validated questionnaire based on the Fukuda guidelines for CFS/EM and DSM-5 Checklist for PTSD (The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 or PCL-5) to determine the presence of stress disorder and chronic fatigue problems. A total of 120 patients were enrolled. The prevalence rate of fatigue symptoms was 17.5%. Twelve (10%) screened positive for chronic idiopathic fatigue (CIF), 6 (5%) for CFS-like with insufficient fatigue syndrome (CFSWIFS), and 3 (2.5%) for CFS. The mean total scores in PCL-5 were 9.27 ± 10.76 (range:0-44), and the prevalence rate of PTSD was 5.8%. There was no significant association after adjusting between CFS and PTSD, gender, comorbidities, and chloroquine phosphate administration. The obtained data revealed the prevalence of CFS among patients with COVID-19, which is almost similar to CFS prevalence in the general population. Moreover, PTSD in patients with COVID-19 is not associated with the increased risk of CFS. Our study suggested that medical institutions should pay attention to the psychological consequences of the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cough/psychology , Dementia/psychology , Dyspnea/psychology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/psychology , Fever/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cough/complications , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/virology , Dementia/complications , Dementia/drug therapy , Dementia/virology , Drug Combinations , Dyspnea/complications , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/virology , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/complications , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/drug therapy , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic/virology , Female , Fever/complications , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Oseltamivir/therapeutic use , Research Design , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/drug therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Survivors/psychology
6.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(10)2020 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901291

ABSTRACT

A previously fit and well 37-year-old male healthcare worker presented with confusion, psychotic symptoms and a suicide attempt in the context of a new COVID-19 diagnosis. Following surgical interventions and an extended admission to the intensive care unit, he made a good recovery in terms of both his physical and mental health. A number of factors likely contributed to his presentation, including SARS-CoV-2 infection, severe insomnia, worry, healthcare worker-related stress, and the unique social and psychological stressors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. This case highlights the need to further characterise the specific psychiatric sequelae of COVID-19 in community settings, and should remind general medical clinicians to be mindful of comorbid psychiatric symptoms when assessing patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Psychotic Disorders/complications , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Nurses, Male/psychology , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prognosis , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/physiopathology , Risk Assessment , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress, Psychological , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom
8.
Child Abuse Negl ; 110(Pt 2): 104694, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-716607

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic exposes individuals not only to health-related risks, but also to psychosocial fear and acute stress. Previous studies reveal that individuals who experienced child abuse (CA), especially those who suffer from complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD), are at a higher risk of reacting with fear and stress when faced with stressful life-events. OBJECTIVE: To test whether exposure to CA is implicated in a higher risk of COVID-19-related fear and acute stress, and whether CPTSD intervenes in such processes. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: A convenience sample of 837 adults participated in the study during the first peak of COVID-19 in Israel. METHODS: Participants completed self-report questionnaires, assessing child physical, sexual and emotional abuse, CPTSD (ITQ), COVID-19-related acute stress disorder (COVID-19 ASD; ASDS) and fear of COVID-19. RESULTS: Bivariate analyses showed that participants who experienced CA were higher than participants who did not experience CA in COVID-19 ASD (p = .032), but not in fear of COVID-19 (p = .65). Mediation analyses demonstrated two significant paths: in the first, CA was associated with elevated fear of COVID-19 (effect = .061, .059; p < 0.05) and COVID-19 ASD (effect = .14, .084; p < 0.05) through the mediation of CPTSD; in the second path, when controlling for the mediation of CPTSD, CA was associated with reduced fear of COVID-19 (effect = -.15; p = 0.001), and COVID-19 ASD (effect = -.12; p = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS: The findings reveal a complex pattern, indicating that CPTSD may be a risk factor for elevated levels of COVID-19 distress among individuals who experienced CA. However, some CA survivors may express reduced COVID-19 distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Child Abuse/psychology , Fear , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Child , Female , Humans , Israel , Male , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Self Report , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Adolesc Health ; 67(4): 612-614, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705896

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We report on a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak among adolescents at an inpatient behavioral health facility that was identified within 5 weeks of known viral transmission in the surrounding community. METHODS: Clinical records were reviewed for all inpatients aged <18 years with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 between March 23 and April 21, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 19 COVID-19-positive patients aged 11-17 years were identified. Patients most commonly presented with sore throat (37%) and nausea/vomiting (32%). Only 26% of patients presented with cough, shortness of breath, or fever. The most common medical comorbidity was asthma (32%), and the most common psychiatric comorbidity was posttraumatic stress disorder (63%). Infected patients were colocated and managed together on a separate COVID-19 unit to maintain a therapeutic group milieu. Mental health treatment was modified to limit staff exposure. Patients received daily medical assessment by an in-house pediatrician. One patient required intravenous fluids. No patients required transfer to a medical facility. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents in psychiatric inpatient settings may be especially vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. Close collaboration between medical and psychiatric care providers is needed to optimize care for this population and to address admission and disposition options for infected patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Asthma/complications , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Pandemics , Philadelphia , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications
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