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2.
WMJ ; 121(3): E34-E37, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2093113

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We present a case report of a physician assistant who experiences posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from providing care to patients affected with COVID-19. We believe this case is important as it will reveal the unfortunate impact COVID-19 has on the mental health of health care professionals. CASE PRESENTATION: A 51-year-old White woman presented to our clinic with a 1-year history of panic attacks, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, nightmares, social withdrawal, guilt, and depression. DISCUSSION: Cross-sectional, survey-based studies have highlighted PTSD rates in health care workers during the pandemic, but these studies have not explored how exactly PTSD presents on the individual level. CONCLUSIONS: This case presents a compelling reflection on what could be a larger trend of increasing mental health issues as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic and emphasizes the need for better mental health support and infrastructure to be in place for the well-being of the health care workers in this country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physician Assistants , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Intensive Care Units , Depression
3.
WMJ ; 121(3): E34-E37, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084243

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We present a case report of a physician assistant who experiences posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from providing care to patients affected with COVID-19. We believe this case is important as it will reveal the unfortunate impact COVID-19 has on the mental health of health care professionals. CASE PRESENTATION: A 51-year-old White woman presented to our clinic with a 1-year history of panic attacks, mood swings, difficulty sleeping, nightmares, social withdrawal, guilt, and depression. DISCUSSION: Cross-sectional, survey-based studies have highlighted PTSD rates in health care workers during the pandemic, but these studies have not explored how exactly PTSD presents on the individual level. CONCLUSIONS: This case presents a compelling reflection on what could be a larger trend of increasing mental health issues as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic and emphasizes the need for better mental health support and infrastructure to be in place for the well-being of the health care workers in this country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physician Assistants , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Intensive Care Units , Depression
4.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(1)2020 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066784

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of and risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study between March and May 2020 at the Lille University Hospital (France), including all patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Psychological distress symptoms were measured 3 weeks after onset of COVID-19 symptoms using the Impact of Event Scale-6 items (IES-6). The evaluation of PTSD symptoms using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) took place 1 month later. Bivariate analyses were performed to analyze the relationship between PCL-5 scores and the demographic and health variables. The significant variables were then introduced into a multivariable linear regression analysis to establish their relative contributions to the severity of PTSD symptoms. RESULTS: 180 patients were included in this study, and 138 patients completed the 2 evaluations. Among the 180 patients, 70.4% patients required hospitalization, and 30.7% were admitted to the intensive care unit. The prevalence of PTSD was 6.5%, and the predictive factors of PTSD included psychological distress at the onset of the illness and a stay in an intensive care unit. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of PTSD in patients with COVID-19 is not as high as that reported among patients during previous epidemics. Initial psychological responses were predictive of a PTSD diagnosis, even though most patients showing acute psychological distress (33.5% of the sample) improved in the following weeks. PTSD symptoms also increased following a stay in an intensive care unit. Future studies should assess the long-term consequences of COVID-19 on patients' mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Distress , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Severity of Illness Index , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
5.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 638, 2022 10 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064763

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The context of the COVID-19 pandemic has harmed the mental health of the population, increasing the incidence of mental health problems such as depression, especially in those who have had COVID-19. Our study puts forward an explanatory model of depressive symptoms based on subjective psychological factors in those hospitalized for COVID-19 with and without biological markers (i.e., inflammatory markers). Therefore, we aim to evaluate the hypotheses proposed in the model to predict the presence of depressive symptoms. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional study, using a simple random sampling. Data from 277 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Lima-Peru, were collected to assess mental health variables (i.e., depressive, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and somatic symptoms), self-perception of COVID-19 related symptoms, and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) such as inflammatory marker. We performed a structural equation modeling analysis to evaluate a predictive model of depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The results showed a prevalence of depressive symptoms (11.2%), anxiety symptoms (7.9%), somatic symptoms (2.2%), and symptoms of post-traumatic stress (6.1%) in the overall sample. No association was found between the prevalence of these mental health problems among individuals with and without severe inflammatory response. The mental health indicators with the highest prevalence were sleep problems (48%), low energy (47.7%), nervousness (48.77%), worry (47.7%), irritability (43.7%) and back pain (52%) in the overall sample. The model proposed to explain depressive symptoms was able to explain more than 83.7% of the variance and presented good goodness-of-fit indices. Also, a different performance between the proposed model was found between those with and without severe inflammatory response. This difference was mainly found in the relationship between anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms, and between the perception of COVID-19 related symptoms and somatic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Results demonstrated that our model of mental health variables may explain depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients of COVID-19 from a third-level hospital in Peru. In the model, perception of symptoms influences somatic symptoms, which impact both anxiety symptoms and symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Thus, anxiety symptoms could directly influence depressive symptoms or through symptoms of post-traumatic stress. Our findings could be useful to decision-makers for the prevention of depression, used to inform the creation of screening tools (i.e., perception of symptoms, somatic and anxiety symptoms) to identify vulnerable patients to depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/psychology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
6.
Ann Ist Super Sanita ; 58(3): 154-161, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2040235

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The whole hospital system was stressed and at risk in the first phase of the pandemic. This study examined the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in all hospital staff, medical and non-medical, within two months of the pandemic declaration. Survey concerned staff 4510 health workers of Italian Highly Specialized Research Hospitals. METHOD: Subjects were asked to complete an on-line self-reported questionnaire, the PTSD Checklist 5 (PCL-5) and subjective perception of safety related to personal protective equipment (PPE). RESULTS: The sample included staff working in hospitals with or without COVID-19 patient admissions. Overall, 11.56% of the hospitals staff met the symptoms criteria for probable PTSD. The sample included 80.63% (3467) medical staff workers and 19.37% (833) non-medical staff workers. The 31.91% of participants worked in COVID-19 hospitals/wards. The prevalence of positive screening for PTSD symptoms in medical staff was 12.42% (426) and in non-medical staff, 8.59% (70). Among medical staff, anesthesiologists had a significant prevalence of PTSD (22.35%), followed by health care assistants/technicians (15.38%) and physicians (10.11%). Among non-medical staff, personnel involved in cleaning, catering, maintenance, security, and transportation, the symptoms of PTSD reached a rate of 12.24% and in administrative staff 8.47%. Risk factors associated with PTSD included working as an anesthesiologist, perceiving PPE as inadequate, and working in COVID-19 hospitals/wards. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, as in other studies, the prevalence of PTSD symptoms among hospital workers was significatively higher than the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in the general population, showing the pandemic's incredible impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Aten Primaria ; 54(10): 102460, 2022 10.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035767

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of post-COVID-19 patients in primary care. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, multicenter, random probability sampling study. LOCATION: Primary care centers in Ica-Peru. PARTICIPANTS: Six hundred and thirty-six patients with previous diagnosis of COVID-19. MAIN MEASURES: The variable PTSD symptoms was measured with the COVID-19-PTSD questionnaire and HRQOL with the EuroQol scale (EQ-5D). Sociodemographic and health factors including post-COVID-19 syndrome were analyzed. A descriptive analysis was performed and crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated using generalized linear models of the Poisson family to search for associations between variables. RESULTS: Of the participants, 21.4% presented symptoms of PTSD; 33.6% symptoms of dysphoric and anxious arousal; 22.3% intrusion, avoidance and negative affect; 22.6% anhedonia; and 23.6% externalizing behavior. 50.3% revealed at least one component of HRQoL affected; 35.5% problems linked to anxiety/depression; 34.9% pain/discomfort; 11% daily activity; 10.7% mobility and 6.6% self-care. The presence of PTSD symptoms was associated with the HRQoL affected (PR=2.46: 95% CI: 2.19-2.78). Also, certain sociodemographic and health variables were associated with PTSD symptoms and affected HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS: PTSD symptoms, increase the probability of affecting the patient's HRQoL post COVID-19. There are potentially modifiable sociodemographic and health variables that could decrease PTSD symptoms and improve HRQoL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Primary Health Care , Quality of Life , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
8.
J Affect Disord ; 318: 54-61, 2022 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004184

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Psychological adaptability, or the reduction of psychiatric symptoms in the context of ongoing stressors, is well-documented. The present study assessed relationships between COVID-19 related stressors and depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress (PTS) during April and July 2020. METHODS: Prevalence of, and changes in, symptom severity levels in April vs. July were measured with ANOVA F-tests. Logistic regressions were used to assess the odds of probable diagnosis. RESULTS: Symptom distributions skewed lower in July, as compared to April for all three diagnostic categories. From April to July, prevalence of probable anxiety and depression decreased across all levels of stress, prevalence of PTS increased for high stress, and decreased for medium and low stress levels. In July, only high stress related to higher odds of probable diagnoses, as compared to April when both medium and high stress did. LIMITATIONS: Due to use of cross-sectional self-report data, the present findings could not establish causality between variables, and provide probable, rather than clinical, diagnoses. CONCLUSION: Findings emphasize adaptability phenomena during COVID-19 and highlight the nuanced impact of ongoing stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
9.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273176, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993516

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vulnerability for depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms due to perceived traumatic birth increase during the postpartum period. Traumatic birth has been defined as an event occurring during labour and birth that may be a serious threat to the life and safety of the mother and/or child. However, the comorbidity and multimorbidity of depression, anxiety and PTSD with their direct and indirect predictors is not well investigated in the postpartum period. In addition, the longitudinal directional association of depression, anxiety and PTSD with their comorbidities is not studied in Ethiopia. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of postnatal comorbid and multimorbid anxiety, depression and PTSD. It also aimed to determine the directional association of postnatal anxiety, depression and PTSD with the comorbidity and multimorbidity of these mental health problems over time and to explore the factors that are directly or indirectly associated with comorbidity and multimorbidity of anxiety, depression and PTSD. METHODS: A total of 775 women were included at the first, second and third follow-up of the study (6th, 12th and 18th week of postpartum period) during October, 2020 -March, 2021. A cross-lagged autoregressive path analysis was carried out using Stata 16.0 software in order to determine the autoregressive and cross-lagged effects of depression, anxiety and PTSD with their comorbidities. In addition, a linear structural equation modelling was also carried out to determine the direct and indirect effects of independent variables on the comorbidities of depression, anxiety and PTSD. RESULTS: Comorbidity of anxiety with depression was the most common (14.5%, 12.1% and 8.1%) at the 6th, 12th and 18th week of postnatal period respectively. With regard to the direction of association, comorbidity of PTSD (due to perceived traumatic birth) with depression, PTSD with anxiety, depression with anxiety and triple comorbidity predicted depression and anxiety in subsequent waves of measurement. Direct and indirect maternal morbidity, fear of childbirth and perceived traumatic childbirth were found to have a direct and indirect positive association with comorbidities of depression, anxiety and PTSD. In contrast, higher parity, higher family size and higher social support had a direct and indirect negative association with these mental health disorders. CONCLUSION: Postnatal mental health screening, early diagnosis and treatment of maternal morbidities, developing encouraging strategies for social support and providing adequate information about birth procedures and response to mothers' needs during childbirth are essential to avert comorbidity of anxiety, depression and PTSD in the postpartum period.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Comorbidity , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Longitudinal Studies , Parturition/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Prevalence , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
14.
J Med Case Rep ; 16(1): 263, 2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has had a serious impact on global mental health, particularly in intensive care unit survivors. Given the lethal potential and unpredictability of coronavirus disease 2019, a high risk of posttraumatic stress disorder was identified in the beginning of the crisis. There are insufficient details in current literature and no official guidelines available for the treatment and follow-up of acute stress disorder and the prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder for intensive care unit survivors in the context of coronavirus disease 2019. CASE PRESENTATION: We hereby describe a 67-year-old Swiss patient presenting a psychiatric reaction in the context of coronavirus disease 2019. He was admitted to the intensive care unit due to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and intubated for 13 days. Afterwards, there was a severe worsening of acute renal failure prompting hemodialysis, and he developed delirium. Psychiatric liaison was requested 4 days post-intubation because the patient presented residual symptoms of delirium, false memories about the real context of his medical care, and ideas of persecution toward medical caregivers. He suffered from a very strong peritraumatic reaction, then developed an acute stress disorder linked with his care on the intensive care unit. We looked for strategies to prevent progression from acute stress disorder to posttraumatic stress disorder. We proceeded to the following therapeutic interventions: intensive psychiatric follow-up, intensive care unit diary, and low-dose antipsychotic treatment. The aim of our psychotherapeutic approach was to allow him to increase his feeling of security and to cope with the reality of his traumatic experience. He showed clinical improvement in his mental state after 3 months, despite several predictive factors of evolution to post-intensive care unit posttraumatic stress disorder. CONCLUSION: This case report illustrates how a delusional clinical presentation after intensive care in the context of coronavirus disease 2019 can hide psychotraumatic symptoms. It is important to highlight that the intensive care unit diary completed by the intensive care team and the follow-up by the psychiatric liaison team helped the patient reconstruct an appropriate and coherent account. Further studies are needed to determine the psychiatric effects of coronavirus disease 2019 and to assess early and appropriate psychiatric intervention for patients hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019 to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Aged , Delirium/complications , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Survivors
15.
J Gen Intern Med ; 37(8): 2033-2040, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1872683

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Moral injury has primarily been studied in combat veterans but might also affect healthcare workers (HCWs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To compare patterns of potential moral injury (PMI) between post-9/11 military combat veterans and healthcare workers (HCWs) surveyed during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional surveys of veterans (2015-2019) and HCWs (2020-2021) in the USA. PARTICIPANTS: 618 military veterans who were deployed to a combat zone after September 11, 2001, and 2099 HCWs working in healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. MAIN MEASURES: Other-induced PMI (disturbed by others' immoral acts) and self-induced PMI (disturbed by having violated own morals) were the primary outcomes. Sociodemographic variables, combat/COVID-19 experience, depression, quality of life, and burnout were measured as correlates. KEY RESULTS: 46.1% of post-9/11 veterans and 50.7% of HCWs endorsed other-induced PMI, whereas 24.1% of post-9/11 veterans and 18.2% of HCWs endorsed self-induced PMI. Different types of PMI were significantly associated with gender, race, enlisted vs. officer status, and post-battle traumatic experiences among veterans and with age, race, working in a high COVID-19-risk setting, and reported COVID-19 exposure among HCWs. Endorsing either type of PMI was associated with significantly higher depressive symptoms and worse quality of life in both samples and higher burnout among HCWs. CONCLUSIONS: The potential for moral injury is relatively high among combat veterans and COVID-19 HCWs, with deleterious consequences for mental health and burnout. Demographic characteristics suggestive of less social empowerment may increase risk for moral injury. Longitudinal research among COVID-19 HCWs is needed. Moral injury prevention and intervention efforts for HCWs may benefit from consulting models used with veterans.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Veterans , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Veterans/psychology
16.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(3)2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835048

ABSTRACT

Objective: A range of psychiatric morbidities such as persistent depression, anxiety, insomnia, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been observed in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) survivors. The objective of this study was to explore the psychological status of health care workers after recovery from COVID-19 and to examine the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with psychiatric morbidity.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among health care workers of a tertiary care hospital in South India. The study included health care workers who tested positive for COVID-19 according to the provisional guidelines of the World Health Organization. The data were collected after they tested negative for COVID-19 from September 2020 to October 2020. The study used a semistructured proforma and rating scales such as the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 to assess for depression, anxiety, and PTSD.Results: The results indicate that the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and PTSD among 107 post-COVID patients was 26.2%%, 12.1%, and 3.7%%, respectively. Female sex (P = .017), patients with post-COVID persistent physical symptoms (P = .05), and the duration of fever during the acute phase of COVID-19 infection (P = .005) were found to have a statistically significant association with a higher rate of depression among the study population.Conclusions: The study findings indicate that all COVID-19 survivors working in the health care sector should be screened for depression and anxiety disorders regularly for early detection and effective management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Morbidity , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Survivors/psychology
17.
BMJ Open ; 12(5): e054062, 2022 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832442

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and predictors of morally injurious events (MIEs) and post-traumatic embitterment disorder (PTED) in UK health and social care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: September-October 2020 in the UK. Online survey hosted on Qualtrics, and recruited through Prolific. PARTICIPANTS: 400 health and social care workers, aged 18 or above and living and working in the UK during the pandemic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: MIEs were assessed using the Moral Injury Events Scale and PTED was assessed using the PTED self-rating scale. Potential predictors were measured using surveys of exposure to occupational stressors, optimism, self-esteem, resilient coping style, consideration of future consequences and personal belief in a just world. RESULTS: 19% of participants displayed clinical levels of PTED, and 73% experienced at least one COVID-related MIE. Exposure to occupational stressors increased the risk of experiencing PTED and MIEs, whereas personal belief in a procedurally just world, which is the belief that they experienced fair processes, was a protective mechanism. CONCLUSIONS: MIEs and PTED are being experienced by UK health and social care professionals, particularly in those exposed to work-related stressors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Social Support , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
18.
Vertex ; XXXIII(155): 25-35, 2022 Mar.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1791216

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this research is to establish and evaluate the frequency of anxiety, burnout and post-traumatic stress disorder in health personnel during the COVID-19 pandemic according to the degree of exposure in three public healthcare facilities with different levels of complexity in Buenos Aires, Argentina. METHODS: Multicenter, prospective, analytical study. The sample was taken through a three-step voluntary and anonymous online form with three invento- ries: Gad 7, Maslach Inventory and Davidson Trauma Scale and a self-perceived risk questionnaire. RESULTS: In a total sample of n=1391, a higher prevalence of anxiety symptoms (mild: M=41%; moderate to severe: M=27%) and sleep difficulties (M=73%) was found, while levels of post-traumatic stress (M=36%) and burnout remained lower (M=19%). While the chi-square tests indicated associations between job positions with higher exposure and the presence of symptoms, the logistic regression models indicated that the professionals in training and those who reported higher levels of self-perceived risk showed a greater presence of psychological symptoms. DISCUSSION: The self-perception of risk is an important factor when considering the presence of symptoms, regardless of the actual degree of exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Measures to promote mental well-being in healthcare workers must be implemented immediately and sustained over time, especially in young people, females and frontline workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Argentina/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
19.
Enferm Clin ; 32(2): 92-102, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788059

ABSTRACT

Aim: To analyse the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in nursing staff and the variables that may contribute to its development. Method: Cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire given to nurses, nursing assistants and nursing supervisors in June 2020. It included sociodemographic, mental health, occupational, COVID-19 related variables, Modified Risk Perception Scale (modified RPS) score, Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) and Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS) score for the assessment of PTSD. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: Of the 344 participants, 88.7% were women and 93.6% cared for infected patients; 45.9% had PTSD (DTS≥40). The variables associated with PTSD were previous PTSD symptoms (OR=6.1, 95% CI [2.68-14.03]), death of a family member or friend due to COVID-19 (OR=2.3, 95% CI [1.22-4.39]), and higher scores on the modified RPS (OR= 1.1, 95% CI [1.07-1.31]). Higher BRS scores were associated with a lower risk of PTSD (OR=0.4, 95% CI [0.31-0.68]). Conclusions: The prevalence of PTSD in nursing staff is high, mainly in professionals with previous PTSD symptoms, family members or friends deceased from COVID-19, high risk perception and/or low resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
20.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(5): 1096-1104, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784697

ABSTRACT

AIM: To analyse the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and examine its related factors among nurses who worked during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Daegu, South Korea. BACKGROUND: Nurses are a high-risk population for PTSD, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was conducted to identify the nursing work environmental factors that should be addressed to reduce PTSD. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, 365 nurses were enrolled. Their characteristics (intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, and COVID-19-related) and PTSD Checklist-5 scores were analysed. RESULTS: The average PTSD score was 14.98 ± 15.94, and 16.5% of the participants had a high risk of PTSD. Nurses were more likely to have PTSD if they were married (odds ratio = 3.02, p = .013) and when nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support of nurses were low (odds ratio = 3.81, p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The nursing work environment was found to be associated with PTSD. Therefore, interventions are necessary to increase nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support for nurses to reduce the risk of PTSD among nurses. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Effective professional and social support and interventions to improve nurse managers' abilities, leadership, and support of nurses are needed to reduce PTSD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
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