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3.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 189-198, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466864

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study is to compare the emotional effects of COVID-19 among three different groups, namely: health personnel, medical students, and a sample of the general population. METHODS: 375 participants were recruited for this study, of which 125 were medical students (preclinical studies, 59; clinical studies, 66), 125 were health personnel (COVID-19 frontline personnel, 59; personnel not related with COVID-19, 66), and 125 belonged to the general population. The PHQ-9, GAD-7, and CPDI scales were used to assess the emotional impact. A multinomial logistic regression was performed to measure differences between groups, considering potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Regarding CPDI values, all other groups showed reduced values compared to COVID-19 frontline personnel. However, the general population, preclinical and clinical medical students showed increased PHQ-9 values compared to COVID-19 frontline personnel. Finally, confounding factors, gender and age correlated negatively with higher CPDI and PHQ-9 scores. CONCLUSIONS: Being frontline personnel is associated with increased COVID-19-related stress. Depression is associated, however, with other groups not directly involved with the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Female gender and younger age correlated with COVID-19-related depression and stress.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Peru/epidemiology , Psychological Tests , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(18): 5836-5842, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1451041

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Functional gastrointestinal disorders are common gastrointestinal diseases. The pathophysiology is multifactorial and psychosocial distress worsens symptoms severity. Since the end of 2019 the world has been facing COVID-19 pandemic. The associated control measures have affected the psychological health of people. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders among Italian children and adolescents. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study sample is composed of 407 patients (187 males, 220 females), aged from 10 to 17 years. The mean age is 14.27 ± 2.24 years. The study was conducted through the Italian version of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version.  The prevalence of each disorder has been calculated as the ratio of affected subjects for each disease and the total number of effective cases for that specific disease. RESULTS: The study demonstrates that the prevalence of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorder in Italian children, during the COVD-19 pandemic, is higher, compared with the one reported in the previous studies. The most frequent disorders are Abdominal Migraine and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Our study is the first one which provides data of the prevalence of Functional gastrointestinal disorders in sample of Italian adolescents, during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study underlines the need to focus on stress management, in order to reduce the effects of the lockdown on the psychological wellness of the youngest.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/etiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/complications , Abdominal Pain/epidemiology , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Abdominal Pain/psychology , Adolescent , Aerophagy/epidemiology , Aerophagy/etiology , Aerophagy/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Constipation/epidemiology , Constipation/etiology , Constipation/psychology , Dyspepsia/epidemiology , Dyspepsia/etiology , Dyspepsia/psychology , Fecal Incontinence/epidemiology , Fecal Incontinence/etiology , Fecal Incontinence/psychology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/epidemiology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/etiology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/psychology , Italy , Male , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Migraine Disorders/etiology , Migraine Disorders/psychology , Prevalence , Rumination Syndrome/epidemiology , Rumination Syndrome/etiology , Rumination Syndrome/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vomiting/epidemiology , Vomiting/etiology , Vomiting/psychology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438622

ABSTRACT

Despite extensive investigations of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) since its development in 1995, its factor structure and other psychometric properties still need to be firmly established, with several calls for revising its item structure. Employing confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), this study examined the factor structure of the DASS-21 and five shortened versions of the DASS-21 among psychiatric patients (N = 168) and the general public (N = 992) during the COVID-19 confinement period in Saudi Arabia. Multigroup CFA, Mann Whitney W test, Spearman's correlation, and coefficient alpha were used to examine the shortened versions of the DASS-21 (DASS-13, DASS-12, DASS-9 (two versions), and DASS-8) for invariance across age and gender groups, discriminant validity, predictive validity, item coverage, and internal consistency, respectively. Compared with the DASS-21, all three-factor structures of the shortened versions expressed good fit, with the DASS-8 demonstrating the best fit and highest item loadings on the corresponding factors in both samples (χ2(16, 15) = 16.5, 67.0; p = 0.420, 0.001; CFI = 1.000, 0.998; TLI = 0.999, 0.997; RMSEA = 0.013, 0.059, SRMR = 0.0186, 0.0203). The DASS-8 expressed configural, metric, and scalar invariance across age and gender groups. Its internal consistency was comparable to other versions (α = 0.94). Strong positive correlations of the DASS-8 and its subscales with the DASS-21 and its subscales (r = 0.97 to 0.81) suggest adequate item coverage and good predictive validity of this version. The DASS-8 and its subscales distinguished the clinical sample from the general public at the same level of significance expressed by the DASS-21 and other shortened versions, supporting its discriminant validity. Neither the DASS-21 nor the shortened versions distinguished patients diagnosed with depression and anxiety from each other or from other psychiatric conditions. The DASS-8 represents a valid short version of the DASS-21, which may be useful in research and clinical practice for quick identification of individuals with potential psychopathologies. Diagnosing depression/anxiety disorders may be further confirmed in a next step by clinician-facilitated examinations. Brevity of the DASS-21 would save time and effort used for filling the questionnaire and support comprehensive assessments by allowing the inclusion of more measures on test batteries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Anxiety/diagnosis , Depression/diagnosis , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Humans , Mental Health , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 42(4): e107-e115, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435924

ABSTRACT

Background: The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related mental health status on chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) has not been addressed before. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the depression, anxiety and stress levels, and the fear of COVID-19 in patients with mild-to-moderate CSU and to determine their impact on urticaria activity during the pandemic. Methods: A total of 509 patients with mild-to-moderate CSU were prospectively evaluated with validated scales, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21) and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) during the lockdown period (LP) and the return to normal period (RTNP). CSU activity was determined with the urticaria activity score summed over 7 days (UAS7) and medication scores (MS). UAS7 and MS before the pandemic were retrospectively collected from medical records. Results: The median UAS7 and MS were both significantly higher in the LP than in the median of related scores during the prepandemic period (p < 0.0001) and the RTNP (p < 0.0001). The mean FCV-19S and DASS-21 scores were both significantly higher in the LP than in the RTNP (p < 0.0001). The FCV-19S and the DASS-21 anxiety and stress subscales were significantly higher in women. The UAS7s were positively correlated with the FCV-19S and depression, anxiety, and stress subscale scores. Conclusion: Fear of COVID-19, anxiety, depression, and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially when strict isolation measures are taken, have a significant impact on mental health and urticaria activity in patients with mild-to-moderate CSU, even though they are not infected. Psychological support for patients with CSU seems to be important to control disease activity during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Chronic Urticaria/psychology , Cost of Illness , Mental Health , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Chronic Urticaria/diagnosis , Chronic Urticaria/epidemiology , Chronic Urticaria/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Fear , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
7.
Metabolism ; 123: 154845, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340768

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Individuals with diabetes/stress hyperglycemia carry an increased risk for adverse clinical outcome in case of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether this risk is, at least in part, modulated by an increase of thromboembolic complications. METHODS: We prospectively followed 180 hospitalized patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to the Internal Medicine Units of San Raffaele Hospital. Data from 11 out of 180 patients were considered incomplete and excluded from the analysis. We analysed inflammation, tissue damage biomarkers, hemostatic parameters, thrombotic events (TEs) and clinical outcome according to the presence of diabetes/stress hyperglycemia. RESULTS: Among 169 patients, 51 (30.2%) had diabetes/stress hyperglycemia. Diabetes/stress hyperglycemia and fasting blood glucose (FBG) were associated with increased inflammation and tissue damage circulating markers, higher D-dimer levels, increased prothrombin time and lower antithrombin III activity. Forty-eight venous and 10 arterial TEs were identified in 49 (29%) patients. Diabetes/stress hyperglycemia (HR 2.71, p = 0.001), fasting blood glucose (HR 4.32, p < 0.001) and glucose variability (HR 1.6, p < 0.009) were all associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic complication. TEs significantly increased the risk for an adverse clinical outcome only in the presence of diabetes/stress hyperglycemia (HR 3.05, p = 0.010) or fasting blood glucose ≥7 mmol/L (HR 3.07, p = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Thromboembolism risk is higher among patients with diabetes/stress hyperglycemia and COVID-19 pneumonia and is associated to poor clinical outcome. In case of SARS-Cov-2 infection patients with diabetes/stress hyperglycemia could be considered for a more intensive prophylactic anticoagulation regimen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/etiology , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/therapy , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
8.
J Formos Med Assoc ; 120(8): 1602-1610, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317715

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Global pandemic resulted from the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) demands mental health concerns on the affected population. We examine the time-course shift of psychological burden among suspected and confirmed COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Participants with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 were included in the cohort. Consecutive surveys were conducted upon hospital admission, discharge, and during outpatient follow-up by adapting the 5-item brief symptom rating scale (BSRS-5) assessing psychological symptoms including anxiety, depression, hostility, interpersonal sensitivity, and insomnia. The sixth measure to observe suicidal ideation was also included. RESULTS: A total of 109 eligible patients participated in the study, in which 83.49% reported no distress upon hospital admission, while 2.75%, 3.66%, and 10.1% patients were assessed as being with severe, moderate and mild psychological distress, respectively. Overall, age, sex, and history of contact did not significantly differ between patients with and without psychological distress. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that patients admitted during April-May (OR: 7.66, 95% CI: 1.46-40.28) and presented with symptoms including sore throat (OR: 4.24, 95% CI: 1.17-15.29) and malaise (OR: 5.24, 95% CI: 1.21-22.77) showed significantly higher risk of psychological distress. Cough symptom interestingly showed lower risk of emotional distress (OR: 0.25, 95% CI: 0.08-0.81). Subsequent surveys upon hospital discharge and during outpatient follow-up revealed steadily declining distress among all cohort. CONCLUSION: At least 16.5% of our cohort reported psychological distress upon hospital admission, with distinct time-dependent decline. Access to mental health support, alongside with promoting positive activities for good mental health are pivotal for those directly affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Sports Sci Med ; 20(3): 421-430, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316068

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to identify coherence, hope for success and coping strategies as predictors of mood among this year's Olympians in the context of coronavirus events. The relationships between the above variables and the mood of athletes were analysed. The study group consisted of 57 athletes - women (29) and men (28) between 18 and 39 years of age - representing various sports disciplines who were preparing for the Tokyo Olympics. The research was conducted in the period of April 7-28, 2020 during the first threat of COVID-19 pandemic, following the decision to move the Summer Olympics to the year 2021. It was time of the greatest national restrictions and information about the postponement of the games had been received. As a result of the step regression analysis, three predictors of vigour were established: sense of meaningfulness, coping with stress through positive reframing, and not using the self-blaming strategy. A positive predictor of anger was the use of substances. Confusion was predicted based on the frequency of behavioral disengagement. Behavioral disengagement predicted the severity of depression. Predictors of fatigue were the sense of meaningfulness, and the strategies of positive reframing and self-blaming. The results obtained emphasize the importance of positive reframing as a factor contributing to maintaining a positive mood state. In contrast, behavioral disengagement and self-blaming were strategies that lowered the mood of elite athletes. The results confirm the importance of factors included in the salutogenic model (sense of coherence, coping strategies) as predictors of athletes' mood during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Athletes/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Sense of Coherence , Adult , Affect , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tokyo , Young Adult
10.
PLoS Med ; 18(6): e1003621, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, 235 million people are impacted by humanitarian emergencies worldwide, presenting increased risk of experiencing a mental disorder. Our objective was to test the effectiveness of a brief group psychological treatment delivered by trained facilitators without prior professional mental health training in a disaster-prone setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT) from November 25, 2018 through September 30, 2019. Participants in both arms were assessed at baseline, midline (7 weeks post-baseline, which was approximately 1 week after treatment in the experimental arm), and endline (20 weeks post-baseline, which was approximately 3 months posttreatment). The intervention was Group Problem Management Plus (PM+), a psychological treatment of 5 weekly sessions, which was compared with enhanced usual care (EUC) consisting of a family psychoeducation meeting with a referral option to primary care providers trained in mental healthcare. The setting was 72 wards (geographic unit of clustering) in eastern Nepal, with 1 PM+ group per ward in the treatment arm. Wards were eligible if they were in disaster-prone regions and residents spoke Nepali. Wards were assigned to study arms based on covariate constrained randomization. Eligible participants were adult women and men 18 years of age and older who met screening criteria for psychological distress and functional impairment. Outcomes were measured at the participant level, with assessors blinded to group assignment. The primary outcome was psychological distress assessed with the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Secondary outcomes included depression symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, "heart-mind" problems, social support, somatic symptoms, and functional impairment. The hypothesized mediator was skill use aligned with the treatment's mechanisms of action. A total of 324 participants were enrolled in the control arm (36 wards) and 319 in the Group PM+ arm (36 wards). The overall sample (N = 611) had a median age of 45 years (range 18-91 years), 82% of participants were female, 50% had recently experienced a natural disaster, and 31% had a chronic physical illness. Endline assessments were completed by 302 participants in the control arm (36 wards) and 303 participants in the Group PM+ arm (36 wards). At the midline assessment (immediately after Group PM+ in the experimental arm), mean GHQ-12 total score was 2.7 units lower in Group PM+ compared to control (95% CI: 1.7, 3.7, p < 0.001), with standardized mean difference (SMD) of -0.4 (95% CI: -0.5, -0.2). At 3 months posttreatment (primary endpoint), mean GHQ-12 total score was 1.4 units lower in Group PM+ compared to control (95% CI: 0.3, 2.5, p = 0.014), with SMD of -0.2 (95% CI: -0.4, 0.0). Among the secondary outcomes, Group PM+ was associated with endline with a larger proportion attaining more than 50% reduction in depression symptoms (29.9% of Group PM+ arm versus 17.3% of control arm, risk ratio = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.4, p = 0.002). Fewer participants in the Group PM+ arm continued to have "heart-mind" problems at endline (58.8%) compared to the control arm (69.4%), risk ratio = 0.8 (95% CI, 0.7, 1.0, p = 0.042). Group PM+ was not associated with lower PTSD symptoms or functional impairment. Use of psychosocial skills at midline was estimated to explain 31% of the PM+ effect on endline GHQ-12 scores. Adverse events in the control arm included 1 suicide death and 1 reportable incidence of domestic violence; in the Group PM+ arm, there was 1 death due to physical illness. Study limitations include lack of power to evaluate gender-specific effects, lack of long-term outcomes (e.g., 12 months posttreatment), and lack of cost-effectiveness information. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found that a 5-session group psychological treatment delivered by nonspecialists modestly reduced psychological distress and depression symptoms in a setting prone to humanitarian emergencies. Benefits were partly explained by the degree of psychosocial skill use in daily life. To improve the treatment benefit, future implementation should focus on approaches to enhance skill use by PM+ participants. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03747055.


Subject(s)
Depression/therapy , Mental Health , Natural Disasters , Problem Solving , Psychotherapy, Brief , Psychotherapy, Group , Relief Work , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Functional Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nepal , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
11.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): 625-629, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304016

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between surgeon gender and stress during the Covid-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Although female surgeons face difficulties integrating work and home in the best of times, the Covid-19 pandemic has presented new challenges. The implications for the female surgical workforce are unknown. METHODS: This cross-sectional, multi-center telephone survey study of surgeons was conducted across 5 academic institutions (May 15-June 5, 2020). The primary outcome was maximum stress level, measured using the validated Stress Numerical Rating Scale-11. Mixed-effects generalized linear models were used to estimate the relationship between surgeon stress level and gender. RESULTS: Of 529 surgeons contacted, 337 surgeons responded and 335 surveys were complete (response rate 63.7%). The majority of female respondents were housestaff (58.1%), and the majority of male respondents were faculty (56.8%) (P = 0.008). A greater proportion of male surgeons (50.3%) than female surgeons (36.8%) had children ≤18 years (P = 0.015). The mean maximum stress level for female surgeons was 7.51 (SD 1.49) and for male surgeons was 6.71 (SD 2.15) (P < 0.001). After adjusting for the presence of children and training status, female gender was associated with a significantly higher maximum stress level (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings that women experienced more stress than men during the Covid-19 pandemic, regardless of parental status, suggest that there is more to the gendered differences in the stress experience of the pandemic than the added demands of childcare. Deliberate interventions are needed to promote and support the female surgical workforce during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Physicians, Women/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
13.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr ; 50(3): 176-183, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228144

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were to determine the usefulness of the Modified (10-item) Scale of Perceived Stress related to COVID-19 (EEP-10-C, for its acronym in Spanish) and to identify the levels of stress perceived by students of medical sciences in Cuba due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted, with self-reported data of students from 14 Cuban universities of medical sciences (n=200), through an online survey. The EEP-10-C was used as an instrument to identify stress. Its validity was determined through a confirmatory factor analysis and its internal consistency and reliability was measured by the Cronbach's alpha. A cluster analysis was performed to establish as the cut-off point the centre of the cluster with the highest values of stress perceived by the scale. RESULTS: The average age of the sample was 23.30± 1.91 years, with observed scores of the EEP-10-C between 0 and 29 points (13.25±5.404). When applying the cut-off point ≥25, only two students had high rates of perceived stress. The confirmatory factor analysis supported the validity of the instrument (α=0.755). The cut-off point ≥20 was proposed as a reference of high stress perceived for the study population, when applying this one, 14% of students presented high rates of stress. CONCLUSIONS: In Cuba, students of the medical sciences have participated in research and healthcare support, despite which they have presented low levels of stress. The main contribution of the research was the validation of the EEP-10-C for its use in assessing levels of stress in Cuban medical students, proposing the cut-off point ≥20 as a reference of high stress perceived.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Surveys , Psychological Tests , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cuba/epidemiology , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Pandemics , Perception , Reproducibility of Results , Self Report , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 156(4): 172-176, 2021 02 26.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198965

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The appearance of a highly contagious disease forced the confinement of the population in almost all parts of the world, causing an increase in psychological problems, with pregnant women being a particularly vulnerable group to suffer negative consequences. The aim of this research was to check which confinement or psychological stress variables are related to the increase of anxious and depressive symptoms in pregnant women, as a consequence of the pandemic caused by the COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample was composed of 131 pregnant women who experienced the confinement imposed by the Government of Spain on March 14, 2020. Sociodemographic, obstetric, confinement related and psychological variables were collected. RESULTS: Perceived stress, pregnancy-specific stress, as well as insomnia are predictive variables in most anxious (obsessions and compulsions, anxiety and phobic anxiety) and depressive symptoms related to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to focus future psychological interventions in this population on stress control and sleep monitoring, since these variables influence the increase of anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Physical Distancing , Pregnancy Complications/etiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Policy , Health Surveys , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
16.
Ann Clin Psychiatry ; 33(2): 101-107, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic may adversely impact the mental health of health care workers (HCWs). To address this issue, it is essential to determine levels of anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress, and sources of stress, and to identify subgroups of HCWs at a higher risk of adverse mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of symptoms of mental illness in HCWs in the area surrounding Detroit, Michigan. The online survey included questions about demographics, health and clinical factors, and sources of stress. Several tools were used to assess psychiatric symptoms among HCWs, including the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item assessment, and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5. The adequacy of personal protective equipment, patient resources, and training for highly contagious diseases were rated. RESULTS: The sample (N = 129) was predominantly female (51.2%) and White (65.9%), with 30.2% screening positive for clinical follow-up to assess anxiety, 20.9% for moderate to severe depression, and 16.3% for elevated traumatic stress. Differences were found by self-reported psychiatric diagnosis and chronic conditions, and role on treatment teams. CONCLUSIONS: Frontline HCWs demonstrate high levels of stress and trauma symptoms. Timely screening and accommodations may be needed during health care crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Occupational Stress , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Michigan/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
17.
Midwifery ; 99: 103013, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185181

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the mental health of pregnant women during the early and peak stages of the Covid-19 outbreak DESIGN: Online survey PARTICIPANTS: Pregnant women over the age of 18 years with no mental disorder during the pre-pregnancy period (N = 729). MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: Mental disorders were assessed using the "Depression Anxiety Stress Scale" and social support was determined using the "Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale." Pregnant women had moderate levels of anxiety and depression and mild levels of stress. Anxiety, depression, and stress of moderate or high severity was reported in 62.2%, 44.6%, and 32.2% of the women, respectively. Pregnant women who lost their jobs during the pandemic period showed a 3-fold increase in the risk of anxiety, a 6-fold increase in the risk of depression, and a 4.8-fold increase in the risk of stress. An increase in the perception of social support has protective effects against all three mental disorders during pregnancy. In pregnant women with at least one obstetric risk, the risk of antenatal anxiety is 2 times higher than that in women with no risk. Similarly, women with a chronic physical illness before pregnancy have a higher risk of anxiety during pregnancy than healthy women. Financial strain has predictive value for anxiety and depression, and advanced age is a predictor for depression. KEY CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of mental disorders in pregnant women during the pandemic period was much higher than that during the pre-pandemic period. The high frequency of antenatal mental disorders can lead to an increase in the frequency of obstetric and maternal complications in the short and long term. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Early detection of inadequate social support and economic difficulties of pregnant women during the pandemic period is recommended for protecting their mental health. Pregnant women should have easy access to psychosocial support, and they should be provided obstetric counseling during the pandemic conditions.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Pregnancy Complications , Stress, Psychological , Unemployment/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Maternal Health , Mental Health/trends , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Prenatal Care/methods , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Turkey/epidemiology
18.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 47(6): 2126-2130, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148080

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to clarify how the COVID-19 pandemic impacts psychological stress levels in postpartum women in Yokohama, Japan. METHODS: We retrospectively compared the rates of positive screening tests for postpartum depression (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score of 9 or more or self-injury factors) and liaison/psychiatric intervention rates between pre-pandemic and pandemic groups of postpartum women who delivered a live birth at our tertiary perinatal center in Yokohama, Japan between January 2019 and May 2020. Those whose postpartum health screening was performed in 2019 (March-June 2019) were considered the pre-pandemic group, and those whose screening was performed between March and June 2020 were considered the pandemic group. Adjustments were made for maternal background, pregnancy, and delivery outcomes, including a history of psychiatric disorders, complications, preterm delivery, NICU admission, and maternal postpartum complications, and the data were analyzed using a logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Postpartum health screenings were performed on 339 women before the pandemic and 279 women during the pandemic. Positive screening rates for postpartum depression did not change before and during the pandemic (adjusted odds ratio 1.48, 95% confidence interval 0.885-2.46). CONCLUSIONS: There was no apparent increase in maternal psychological stress due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Yokohama, Japan. Postpartum women responded differently in settings with varied levels of disease severity and social restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression, Postpartum , Depression, Postpartum/diagnosis , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
19.
East Asian Arch Psychiatry ; 31(1): 3-8, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147318

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare older adults with late-life depression (LLD) and healthy controls in terms of suicidal ideation during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to determine predictors of suicidal ideation. METHODS: Between March and April 2020, old adults diagnosed with major depressive disorder (single or recurrent episode) as defined by the DSM-5 were recruited from psychiatric clinics or inpatient wards, whereas 31 healthy older adults without a history of depression or other psychiatric illnesses were recruited from voluntary organisations or elderly community centres. Their depressive symptoms, perceived severity of the pandemic, perceived time spent on receiving related information, perceived health, levels of loneliness, perceived coping efficacy, suicidal ideation, and the level of symptomatic responses to a specific traumatic stressor in the past week were assessed. RESULTS: In total, 21 men and 43 women aged 61 to 89 years were interviewed through telephone by trained research assistants. Of them, 33 were older adults with LLD (cases) and 31 were healthy older adults (controls). Older people with LLD had a higher level of suicidal ideation than healthy controls, after controlling for the level of depression and medical comorbidity (F (1, 59) = 5.72, p = 0.020). Regression analyses showed that coping efficacy and loneliness accounted for a significant portion of the variance in suicidal ideation, and loneliness significantly predicted the level of stress. Mediation analyses reveal an indirect effect between group and suicidal ideation through coping efficacy (Z = 2.43, p = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Older people with LLD are at increased suicidal risk and require timely mental health support. Coping efficacy and loneliness are important predictors for suicidal ideation and stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Mental Disorders , Noncommunicable Diseases , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Case-Control Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/psychology , Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/psychology , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/psychology
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6481, 2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142470

ABSTRACT

The novel Coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020, impacting the lifestyles, economy, physical and mental health of individuals globally. This study aimed to test the model triggered by physical symptoms resembling COVID-19 infection, in which the need for health information and perceived impact of the pandemic mediated the path sequentially, leading to adverse mental health outcomes. A cross-sectional research design with chain mediation model involving 4612 participants from participating 8 countries selected via a respondent-driven sampling strategy was used. Participants completed online questionnaires on physical symptoms, the need for health information, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) questionnaire and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). The results showed that Poland and the Philippines were the two countries with the highest levels of anxiety, depression and stress; conversely, Vietnam had the lowest mean scores in these areas. Chain mediation model showed the need for health information, and the perceived impact of the pandemic were sequential mediators between physical symptoms resembling COVID-19 infection (predictor) and consequent mental health status (outcome). Excessive and contradictory health information might increase the perceived impact of the pandemic. Rapid COVID-19 testing should be implemented to minimize the psychological burden associated with physical symptoms, whilst public mental health interventions could target adverse mental outcomes associated with the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Depression/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Anxiety/psychology , Asia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
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