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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480759

ABSTRACT

Stress and lack of quality sleep affect a large portion of the population around the globe, and the COVID-19 pandemic has genuinely brought attention to these problems. This study aimed to investigate whether using a virtual heart-based meditation program is associated with improved stress levels and quality of sleep among participants from the general population during the COVID-19 pandemic. We recruited 63 participants to receive an 8-week virtually conducted Heartfulness meditation program in a prospective pre-post single-arm intervention study from September 28 to November 22 2020. Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores were collected at baseline, at 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Of the 63 participants enrolled in the study, 36 (57%) completed an 8-week Heartfulness meditation program. There was a significant decrease in PSS (mean difference of 6.68 with 95% C.I. 4.89-8.47, p < 0.0001) and in PSQI (mean difference of 2.05 with 95% C.I. 1.03-3.07, p < 0.0001) between week zero and week eight, regardless of Health Care Professional status. The qualitative thematic analysis strongly supported the survey results. A significant reduction in perceived stress score and improvement in sleep quality index was noted at the end of a virtual Heartfulness meditation program. Moreover, Heartfulness meditation practice may help cultivate the quality of empathy, acceptance, and individual peace. We conclude that the effects of virtually accessible Heartfulness meditation practice need to be explored further in larger studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Meditation , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463647

ABSTRACT

Stress is one of the most common problems among healthcare professionals, as they are exposed to potentially stressful and emotionally challenging situations in the workplace. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) training programs have been shown to decrease stress. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an abbreviated 4-weeks MBSR training program in relation to a standard 8-weeks one on the stress levels. A controlled and randomized clinical trial was designed, in which 112 tutors and resident intern specialists in Family and Community Medicine and Nursing of six Spanish National Health System teaching units (TUs) participated. Participants included in the experimental groups (EGs) received a MBRS training program (standard or abbreviated), while control group (CG) participants did not receive any intervention. The stress levels were assessed by the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ) in three different moments during the study: before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Adjusted covariance analysis (ANCOVA), using pretest scores as the covariate, showed a significant reduction in stress (F(2,91) = 5.165; p = 0.008; η2 = 0.102) in the post-test visit, attributable to the implementation of the standard training program, but without the maintenance of its effects over time. No significant impact of the abbreviated training program on stress levels was observed in the intergroup comparison. A standard 8-weeks MBSR training program aimed at tutors and resident intern specialists in Family and Community Medicine and Nursing produces significant improvements in stress levels compared with the abbreviated intervention and no intervention. New studies about abbreviated training programs are needed to provide effective treatments which improve well-being of these professionals.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Community Medicine , Empathy , Humans , Spain , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 67, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387235

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is not only a threat to physical health but is also having severe impacts on mental health. Although increases in stress-related symptomatology and other adverse psycho-social outcomes, as well as their most important risk factors have been described, hardly anything is known about potential protective factors. Resilience refers to the maintenance of mental health despite adversity. To gain mechanistic insights about the relationship between described psycho-social resilience factors and resilience specifically in the current crisis, we assessed resilience factors, exposure to Corona crisis-specific and general stressors, as well as internalizing symptoms in a cross-sectional online survey conducted in 24 languages during the most intense phase of the lockdown in Europe (22 March to 19 April) in a convenience sample of N = 15,970 adults. Resilience, as an outcome, was conceptualized as good mental health despite stressor exposure and measured as the inverse residual between actual and predicted symptom total score. Preregistered hypotheses (osf.io/r6btn) were tested with multiple regression models and mediation analyses. Results confirmed our primary hypothesis that positive appraisal style (PAS) is positively associated with resilience (p < 0.0001). The resilience factor PAS also partly mediated the positive association between perceived social support and resilience, and its association with resilience was in turn partly mediated by the ability to easily recover from stress (both p < 0.0001). In comparison with other resilience factors, good stress response recovery and positive appraisal specifically of the consequences of the Corona crisis were the strongest factors. Preregistered exploratory subgroup analyses (osf.io/thka9) showed that all tested resilience factors generalize across major socio-demographic categories. This research identifies modifiable protective factors that can be targeted by public mental health efforts in this and in future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Resilience, Psychological , Social Factors , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Europe , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Protective Factors , Regression Analysis , Social Support , Young Adult
5.
Anim Sci J ; 92(1): e13624, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378029

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 epidemic and government intervention measures may have adverse effects on people's mental health. To explore the influence of pets on the intervention of people's psychological problems during the COVID-19 epidemic, an online survey was carried out between April 9 and April 29, 2020. A total of 756 participants replied to this questionnaire. Mental health variables were assessed, and the comparison of behavior changes among pet owners and pets on positive mental well-being during COVID-19 epidemic. Comparative analysis was performed; compared with individuals without pets (n = 575), pet owners (n = 181) had a higher prevalence of insomnia (p = 0.006). Living in Wuhan city was a risk factor for people with psychological stress (p < 0.05). Dog owners exhibited lower than average scores of insomnia and uncertainty of infection than cat owners (p = 0.004). People with more than one pet exhibited lower than average scores of depression than having one pet (p = 0.040). For analysis of psychological effects of pets on people, the role of pets in subjective feeling and positive psychological changes of pet owner was significantly different. Pet owners relieve that psychological pressure through behavioral changes towards their pets in early stage. Pets provided positive subjective well-being and psychological effects for their owners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Human-Animal Bond , Ownership , Pets , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , Cats , Child , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dogs , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Ownership/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , Young Adult
6.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376367

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nurses working during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported elevated levels of anxiety, burnout and sleep disruption. Hospital administrators are in a unique position to mitigate or exacerbate stressful working conditions. The goal of this study was to capture the recommendations of nurses providing frontline care during the pandemic. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Semi-structured interviews were conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 36 nurses living in Canada and working in Canada or the United States. FINDINGS: The following recommendations were identified from reflexive thematic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) The nurses emphasized the need for a leadership style that embodied visibility, availability and careful planning. (2) Information overload contributed to stress, and participants appealed for clear, consistent and transparent communication. (3) A more resilient healthcare supply chain was required to safeguard the distribution of equipment, supplies and medications. (4) Clear communication of policies related to sick leave, pay equity and workload was necessary. (5) Equity should be considered, particularly with regard to redeployment. (6) Nurses wanted psychological support offered by trusted providers, managers and peers. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Over-reliance on employee assistance programmes and other individualized approaches to virtual care were not well-received. An integrative systems-based approach is needed to address the multifaceted mental health outcomes and reduce the deleterious impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nursing workforce. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Results of this study capture the recommendations made by nurses during in-depth interviews conducted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health Services , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Canada , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Leadership , Male , Needs Assessment , Organizational Policy , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States , Workload
7.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 61(6): 703-708, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Student pharmacists and faculty exhibit high levels of stress, independent of the current coronavirus 2019 pandemic, and their path toward wellness, including a reduction in stress and anxiety, is of the utmost importance. Yoga and meditation are proven interventions to reduce stress and anxiety and increase wellness. Yin yoga is an adaptable, quiet practice ideal for those lacking previous yoga experience, flexibility, and time. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a 6-week yin yoga and meditation intervention on College of Pharmacy faculty and students' stress perception, anxiety levels, and mindfulness skills. METHODS: Faculty and students participated in a 6-week pilot program comprising a once-weekly yin yoga class followed by guided meditation. Yin yoga was selected for its quiet meditative style. Participants completed a pre- and postquestionnaire at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months to evaluate potential changes in perceived stress scores, anxiety scores, and mindfulness skills. The questionnaire was composed of 3 self-reporting tools: Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Perceived Stress Scale, and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. RESULTS: Twenty participants, 12 students and 8 faculty (ages 18-66 years), completed the study. Anxiety and stress scores decreased, and mindfulness increased at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months, with all changes reaching statistical significance. No participants reported being in the "high" category of anxiety after intervention using BAI categorical data, although this finding was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Faculty and students demonstrated a reduction in stress and anxiety levels and an increase in mindfulness after a 6-week yin yoga and meditation program. Outcomes suggest that inclusion of an adaptable, meditative practice, which may easily be replicated at home, for as little as once per week for 6 weeks may reduce stress and anxiety and increase mindfulness long term. Creating a culture of wellness should be a priority for all Colleges of Pharmacy.


Subject(s)
Meditation , Mindfulness , Yoga , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Faculty, Pharmacy , Humans , Middle Aged , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Students , Young Adult
8.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 35(5): 257-263, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361815

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) epidemic is associated with impaired sleep quality in nurses for several reasons. The present study aimed to determine the effect of an online mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on improving the sleep quality of nurses working in the COVID-19 care units. In this randomized controlled clinical trial study, all nurses in the 2 COVID-19 patient care units were randomly assigned to the control and intervention groups. The MBSR program was implemented online for 7 weeks for the intervention group by a trainer. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was completed online by the participants in both groups before and after the intervention. The results of the data analysis indicated that the intervention improved the scores of subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep efficiency in the intervention group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in the scores of subjective sleep quality, daily performance, and the total index score in the posttest. Besides, there was a significant difference between the 2 groups in only 2 components of sleep latency and subjective sleep quality. The MBSR program can be an effective intervention to improve the sleep quality of nurses working in COVID-19 intensive care units who are at risk of sleep quality disorders in stressful situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet-Based Intervention , Mindfulness , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Program Evaluation , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Meditation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Latency
9.
BJS Open ; 5(4)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331540

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Core surgical training programmes are associated with a high risk of burnout. This study aimed to assess the influence of a novel enhanced stress-resilience training (ESRT) course delivered at the start of core surgical training in a single UK statutory education body. METHOD: All newly appointed core surgical trainees (CSTs) were invited to participate in a 5-week ESRT course teaching mindfulness-based exercises to develop tools to deal with stress at work and burnout. The primary aim was to assess the feasibility of this course; secondary outcomes were to assess degree of burnout measured using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) scoring. RESULTS: Of 43 boot camp attendees, 38 trainees completed questionnaires, with 24 choosing to participate in ESRT (63.2 per cent; male 13, female 11, median age 28 years). Qualitative data reflected challenges delivering ESRT because of arduous and inflexible clinical on-call rotas, time pressures related to academic curriculum demands and the concurrent COVID-19 pandemic (10 of 24 drop-out). Despite these challenges, 22 (91.7 per cent) considered the course valuable and there was unanimous support for programme development. Of the 14 trainees who completed the ESRT course, nine (64.3 per cent) continued to use the techniques in daily clinical work. Burnout was identified in 23 trainees (60.5 per cent) with no evident difference in baseline MBI scores between participants (median 4 (range 0-11) versus 5 (1-11), P = 0.770). High stress states were significantly less likely, and mindfulness significantly higher in the intervention group (P < 0.010); MBI scores were comparable before and after ESRT in the intervention cohort (P = 0.630, median 4 (range 0-11) versus 4 (1-10)). DISCUSSION: Despite arduous emergency COVID rotas ESRT was feasible and, combined with protected time for trainees to engage, deserves further research to determine medium-term efficacy.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Curriculum , General Surgery/education , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mindfulness , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom , Work Schedule Tolerance
10.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253884, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304459

ABSTRACT

During clinical reasoning case conferences, a learner-centered approach using teleconferencing can create a psychologically safe environment and help learners speak up. This study aims to measure the psychological safety of students who are supposed to self-explain their clinical reasoning to conference participants. This crossover study compared the effects of two clinical reasoning case conference methods on medical students' psychological safety. The study population comprised 4th-5th year medical students participating in a two-week general medicine clinical clerkship rotation, from September 2019 to February 2020. They participated in both a learner-centered approach teleconference and a traditional, live-style conference. Teleconferences were conducted in a separate room, with only a group of students and one facilitator. Participants in group 1 received a learner-centered teleconference in the first week and a traditional, live-style conference in the second week. Participants assigned to group 2 received a traditional, live-style conference in the first week and a learner-centered approach teleconference in the second week. After each conference, Edmondson's Psychological Safety Scale was used to assess the students' psychological safety. We also counted the number of students who self-explained their clinical reasoning processes during each conference. Of the 38 students, 34 completed the study. Six out of the seven psychological safety items were significantly higher in the learner-centered approach teleconferences (p<0.01). Twenty-nine (85.3%) students performed self-explanation in the teleconference compared to ten (29.4%) in the live conference (p<0.01). A learner-centered approach teleconference could improve psychological safety in novice learners and increase the frequency of their self-explanation, helping educators better assess their understanding. Based on these results, a learner-centered teleconference approach has the potential to be a method for teaching clinical reasoning to medical students.


Subject(s)
Clinical Reasoning , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Students, Medical/psychology , Telecommunications , Adult , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Clinical Clerkship/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Over Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Problem-Based Learning/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
12.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: e339-e353, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249568

ABSTRACT

Optimizing the well-being of the oncology clinician has never been more important. Well-being is a critical priority for the cancer organization because burnout adversely impacts the quality of care, patient satisfaction, the workforce, and overall practice success. To date, 45% of U.S. ASCO member medical oncologists report experiencing burnout symptoms of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. As the COVID-19 pandemic remains widespread with periods of outbreaks, recovery, and response with substantial personal and professional consequences for the clinician, it is imperative that the oncologist, team, and organization gain direct access to resources addressing burnout. In response, the Clinician Well-Being Task Force was created to improve the quality, safety, and value of cancer care by enhancing oncology clinician well-being and practice sustainability. Well-being is an integrative concept that characterizes quality of life and encompasses an individual's work- and personal health-related environmental, organizational, and psychosocial factors. These resources can be useful for the cancer organization to develop a well-being blueprint: a detailed start plan with recognized strategies and interventions targeting all oncology stakeholders to support a culture of community in oncology.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Oncologists/psychology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Internet , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Support , United States
13.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E53, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248369

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Latino communities has resulted in greater reports of depression, anxiety, and stress. We present a community-led intervention in Latino communities that integrated social services in mental health service delivery for an equity-based response. METHODS: We used tracking sheets to identify 1,436 unique participants (aged 5-86) enrolled in Latino Health Access's Emotional Wellness program, of whom 346 enrolled in the pre-COVID-19 period (March 2019-February 2020) and 1,090 in the COVID-19 period (March-June 2020). Demographic characteristics and types of services were aggregated to assess monthly trends using Pearson χ2 tests. Regression models were developed to compare factors associated with referrals in the pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 periods. RESULTS: During the pandemic, service volume (P < .001) and participant volume (P < .001) increased significantly compared with the prepandemic period. Participant characteristics were similar during both periods, the only differences being age distribution, expanded geographic range, and increased male participation during the pandemic. Nonreferred services, such as peer support, increased during the pandemic period. Type of referrals significantly changed from primarily mental health services and disease management in the prepandemic period to affordable housing support, food assistance, and supplemental income. CONCLUSION: An effective mental health program in response to the pandemic must incorporate direct mental health services and address social needs that exacerbate mental health risk for Latino communities. This study presents a model of how to integrate both factors by leveraging promotor-led programs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Community Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Depression , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Depression/prevention & control , Emotional Adjustment , Female , /statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mental Health/ethnology , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Work/methods , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243991

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic caused by COVID-19 and the subsequent lockdown have been widely recognized as traumatic events that pose threats to psychological well-being. Recent studies reported that during such traumatic events, women tend to be at greater risk than men for developing symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. Several studies reported that a mindfulness-based stress reduction protocol (MBSR) provides useful skills for dealing with traumatic events. In our study, a sample of Italian females received an 8-week MBSR course plus 6 weeks of video support for meditation practice during the first total lockdown in Italy. We assessed the participants with questionnaires before and after this period to investigate their mindfulness skills, psychological well-being, post-traumatic growth, and psychological flexibility. After the intervention, the meditators group reported improvement in measures associated with self-acceptance, purpose in life, and relation to others compared to the control group. Furthermore, our results showed that participants with greater mindfulness scores showed high levels of psychological flexibility, which in turn was positively associated with higher levels of psychological well-being. We concluded that the MBSR could support psychological well-being, at least in female subjects, even during an unpredictable adverse event, such as the COVID-19 lockdown, by reinforcing key psychological aspects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Depression , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
16.
Syst Rev ; 10(1): 126, 2021 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public safety personnel and frontline healthcare professionals are at increased risk of exposure to potentially psychologically traumatic events (PPTE) and developing posttraumatic stress injuries (PTSI, e.g., depression, anxiety) by the nature of their work. PTSI are also linked to increased absenteeism, suicidality, and performance decrements, which compromise occupational and public health and safety in trauma-exposed workers. Evidence is lacking regarding the effectiveness of "prevention" programs designed to mitigate PTSI proactively. The purpose of this review is to measure the effectiveness of proactive PTSI mitigation programs among occupational groups exposed to PPTE on measures of PTSI symptoms, absenteeism, and psychological wellness. METHODS: Five electronic databases were searched per PRISMA guidelines for English or French peer-reviewed studies from 2008 to 2019 evaluating PTSI and psychological wellness in adults exposed to occupational PPTE. The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. RESULTS: We identified 42 studies evaluating 3182 public safety and frontline healthcare professionals, PPTE-exposed educational staff, and miners. Significant overlap was found across program themes that included mindfulness, psychoeducation, resilience promotion, and stress management strategies. Post-program effect sizes were small (SMD < 0.5) to moderate (SMD < 0.8) for reductions in PTSI symptoms and for promoting measures of well-being as indicated by a meta-analysis on 36 studies. There was no evidence for significant reductions in substance use, absenteeism, or biomarkers of distress except for heart rate. Subgroup analyses indicated that multimodal programs effectively improved general psychological health, while resilience programs improved measures of depression, burnout, coping, and resilience. Effect sizes for resilience, depression, and general psychological health improvements were greatest immediately or 1-month post-training, while improvements in PTSD symptoms and coping were larger at longer follow-up. Studies were of moderate quality and risk of bias. CONCLUSIONS: The current results showcase modest evidence for time-limited reductions in PTSI following participation in holistic programs that promote resilience, stress, and emotion regulation among at-risk workers. Implications for organizational implementation of proactive PTSI mitigation programs and areas of future research are discussed. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO (CRD42019133534).


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Anxiety , Health Personnel , Humans , Mental Health , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
17.
J Complement Integr Med ; 18(3): 637-640, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219500

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Covid-19 Pandemic has affected everyone's mental health. In addition to several preventive measures such as wearing a mask, using sanitizer, measures also need to be taken to prevent anxiety and depressive disorders due to this unexpected crisis situation. Practicing yoga is one of the simple, scientific methods to combat stress and prevent anxiety among children. METHODS: The scientific evidence and anecdotal experiences on benefits of yoga is described in this paper, highlighting the importance of yoga in nurturing the mental well-being in children. RESULTS: Scientifically designed and conducted studies as part of the research programs by health professionals objectively conclude that mental health parameters improve significantly with yoga as an intervention. In addition to mental health, yoga will also improve the physical health and boost immunity among children which will also help in reducing the infection rate in children. CONCLUSIONS: As a way forward, authors strongly recommend establishing yoga as a curriculum at scale to cover the vast vulnerable population of young children who are the future of the nation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Meditation , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Mental Health , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Yoga , Adolescent , Adolescent Health , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders , Child , Child Health , Depression , Depressive Disorder , Humans , Mental Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology
18.
Obstet Gynecol ; 137(6): 1032-1040, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217911

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a consumer-based mobile meditation application (app) on wellness in outpatient obstetric and gynecology patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial at a university outpatient clinic of obstetric and gynecology patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Women were randomly assigned to the intervention group, who was prescribed a mobile meditation app for 30 days, or the control group, which received standard care. The primary outcome was self-reported perceived stress. Secondary outcomes included self-reported depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and satisfaction with the meditation app. A sample size of 80 participants (40 per group) was calculated to achieve 84% power to detect a 3-point difference in the primary outcome. RESULTS: From April to May 2020, 101 women were randomized in the study-50 in the meditation app group and 51 in the control group. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Most characteristics were similar between groups. Perceived stress was significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (mean difference 4.27, 95% CI 1.30-7.24, P=.005, d=0.69 and mean difference 4.28, 95% CI 1.68-6.88, P=.002, d=0.69, respectively). Self-reported depression and anxiety were significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (depression: P=.002 and P=.04; anxiety: P=.01, and P=.04, respectively). Sleep disturbance was significantly less in the intervention group at days 14 and 30 (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). More than 80% of those in the intervention group reported high satisfaction with the meditation app, and 93% reported that mindfulness meditation improved their stress. CONCLUSION: Outpatient obstetric and gynecology patients who used the prescribed consumer-based mobile meditation app during the COVID-19 pandemic had significant reductions in perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance compared with standard care. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04329533.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Pregnancy/psychology , Prenatal Care/methods , Primary Health Care/methods , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Gynecology , Humans , Meditation/psychology , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Obstetrics , Pandemics
19.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(3): 317-329, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192098

ABSTRACT

The current study aims to understand the detrimental effects of COVID-19 pandemic on employee job insecurity and its downstream outcomes, as well as how organizations could help alleviate such harmful effects. Drawing on event system theory and literature on job insecurity, we conceptualize COVID-19 as an event relevant to employees' work, and propose that event strength (i.e., novelty, disruption, and criticality) of COVID-19 influences employee job insecurity, which in turn affects employee work and non-work outcomes. We also identified important organization adaptive practices responding to COVID-19 based on a preliminary interview study, and examined its role in mitigating the undesired effects of COVID-19 event strength. Results from a two-wave lagged survey study indicated that employees' perceived COVID-19 event novelty and disruption (but not criticality) were positively related to their job insecurity, which in turn was positively related to their emotional exhaustion, organizational deviance, and saving behavior. Moreover, organization adaptive practices mitigated the effects of COVID-19 event novelty and criticality (but not disruption) on job insecurity. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Employment/psychology , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Health , Personnel Management/methods , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychological Theory , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control
20.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(4): 244-245, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189530

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The outbreak of the coronavirus is becoming an international crisis these days, overshadowing everything. The outbreak of this disease in different countries, including Iran, has caused a lot of concern. In addition to the dangers it poses to human health, the spread of the virus has become a major challenge and a stressful test, putting additional pressure on these countries. Every step in the coming school year offers an opportunity for an ongoing two-way conversation with your child. Listen carefully to what they say and be careful not to burden them with your fears. Giving voice to concerns means sharing them so no one is holding their worries alone, and remember, kids' development is fluid and many kids can make up for lost time, academically and socially. Humans are resilient. Therefore, if schools do not open - or close their doors - it is important to be hopeful and positive about the future, despite everything that is currently being missed or delayed, whether academic or social.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Schools , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Parent-Child Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology
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