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1.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(12): 1088-1094, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526521

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The optimal anesthesia management for patients with stroke undergoing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) during the COVID-19 pandemic has become a matter of controversy. Some recent guidelines have favored general anesthesia (GA) in patients perceived as high risk for intraprocedural conversion from sedation to GA, including those with dominant hemispheric occlusions/aphasia or baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score >15. We aim to identify the rate and predictors of conversion to GA during MT in a high-volume center where monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is the default modality. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained MT database from January 2013 to July 2020 was undertaken. Analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of intraprocedural conversion to GA. In addition, we analyzed the GA conversion rates in subgroups of interest. RESULTS: Among 1919 MT patients, 1681 (87.6%) started treatment under MAC (median age 65 years (IQR 55-76); baseline NIHSS 16 (IQR 11-21); 48.4% women). Of the 1677 eligible patients, 26 (1.6%) converted to GA including 1.4% (22/1615) with anterior and 6.5% (4/62) with posterior circulation strokes. The only predictor of GA conversion was posterior circulation stroke (OR 4.99, 95% CI 1.67 to 14.96, P=0.004). The conversion rates were numerically higher in right than in left hemispheric occlusions (1.6% vs 1.2%; OR 1.37, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.19, P=0.47) and in milder than in more severe strokes (NIHSS ≤15 vs >15: 2% vs 1.2%; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.36, P=0.23). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the overall rate of conversion from MAC to GA during MT was low (1.6%) and, while higher in posterior circulation strokes, it was not predicted by either hemispheric dominance or stroke severity. Caution should be given before changing clinical practice during moments of crisis.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Aged , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome , United States
2.
Neurologist ; 26(6): 261-267, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been shown to associate with increased risk of thromboembolic events. Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) has long been used to effectively manage those with large-vessel occlusive (LVO) stroke and has similarly been implemented in the management of stroke in COVID-19 patients. REVIEW SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic took the health care sector by a storm. Thus, less is known about MT outcomes in this population and evidence suggesting poor outcomes postthrombectomy for COVID-19 patients is accumulating. We provide a narrative on some of the published studies on the outcomes of MT in COVID-19 patients with LVO between March 2020 and February 2021. A description of patient characteristics, risk factors, COVID-19 infection severity, stroke features and thrombectomy success in this population is also presented as data from several studies show that LVO in COVID-19 patients may have some distinguishing characteristics that make management more challenging. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of COVID-19 on the long-term prognosis of stroke patients after thrombectomy is yet to be determined. The accumulating evidence from current studies indicates a negative impact of COVID-19 on outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients who receive MT, irrespective of timely, successful angiographic recanalization. This review may help alert clinicians of some of the COVID-19-specific postthrombectomy challenges.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/complications , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome
3.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 42(5): 808-814, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376688

ABSTRACT

Robotic interventional neuroradiology is an emerging field with the potential to enhance patient safety, reduce occupational hazards, and expand systems of care. Endovascular robots allow the operator to precisely control guidewires and catheters from a lead-shielded cockpit located several feet (or potentially hundreds of miles) from the patient. This has opened up the possibility of expanding telestroke networks to patients without access to life-saving procedures such as stroke thrombectomy and cerebral aneurysm occlusion by highly-experienced physicians. The prototype machines, first developed in the early 2000s, have evolved into machines capable of a broad range of techniques, while incorporating newly automated maneuvers and safety algorithms. In recent years, preliminary clinical research has been published demonstrating the safety and feasibility of the technology in cerebral angiography and intracranial intervention. The next step is to conduct larger, multisite, prospective studies to assess generalizability and, ultimately, improve patient outcomes in neurovascular disease.


Subject(s)
Nervous System Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Interventional/methods , Robotics/methods , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/surgery , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/surgery , Telemedicine , Thrombectomy
4.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106035, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Most data on telestroke utilization come from single academic hub-and-spoke telestroke networks. Our objective was to describe characteristics of telestroke consultations among a national sample of telestroke sites on one of the most commonly used common vendor platforms, prior to the COVID-19 public health emergency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A commercial telestroke vendor provided data on all telestroke consultations by two specialist provider groups from 2013-2019. Kendall's τ ß nonparametric test was utilized to assess time trends. Generalized linear models were used to assess the association between hospital consult utilization and alteplase use adjusting for hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Among 67,736 telestroke consultations to 132 spoke sites over the study period, most occurred in the emergency department (90%) and for stroke indications (final clinical diagnoses: TIA 13%, ischemic stroke 39%, hemorrhagic stroke 2%, stroke mimics 46%). Stroke severity was low (median NIHSS 2, IQR 0-6). Alteplase was recommended for 23% of ischemic stroke patients. From 2013 to 2019, times from ED arrival to NIHSS, CT scan, imaging review, consult, and alteplase administration all decreased (p<0.05 for all), while times from consult start to alteplase recommendation and bolus increased (p<0.01 for both). Transfer was recommended for 8% of ischemic stroke patients. Number of patients treated with alteplase per hospital increased with increasing number of consults and hospital size and was also associated with US region in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Longer duration of hospital participation in the network was associated with shorter hospital median door-to-needle time for alteplase delivery (39 min shorter per year, p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Among spoke sites using a commercial telestroke platform over a seven-year time horizon, times to consult start and alteplase bolus decreased over time. Similar to academic networks, duration of telestroke participation in this commercial network was associated with faster alteplase delivery, suggesting practice improves performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Remote Consultation/trends , Stroke/surgery , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Improvement/trends , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States
5.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(5): 105642, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091714

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented strain on the health care system. An adaptive strategy for the handling of thrombectomy for patients with large vessel occlusion has evolved at our center to optimize patient care while also minimizing risk of virus transmission. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the new thrombectomy protocol by comparing thrombectomy times and patient outcomes during the pandemic and pre pandemic period. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients who underwent emergent thrombectomy from April 4th, 2020 to August 25th, 2020 (pandemic period) and between December 2nd, 2019 to April 3rd, 2020 (pre-pandemic period). The new protocol centered on a standardized approach to airway management in patients considered 'high-risk' for infection. An array of patient-specific factors and outcomes were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 126 patients were included in the study. There was no significant difference in door-to-recanalization or other time parameters between the two groups (138 minutes during the pandemic vs. 129 minutes pre-pandemic; p=0.37). However, outcomes measured as discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were worse for patients during the pandemic (mRS ≤ 2, 10/58; 17.2% during pandemic vs. 24/68; 35.3% pre-pandemic, p = 0.02). No neurointerventional providers have been found to contract COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Our approach to mechanical thrombectomy during the COVID-19 era was associated with similar recanalization rates but worse clinical outcomes compared to pre pandemic period. Further studies are necessary to identify factors contributing to worse outcomes during this ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases/surgery , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/surgery , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Pandemics , Stroke/surgery , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Airway Management , Cerebrovascular Circulation , Clinical Protocols , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Thrombectomy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
7.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(12): 1088-1094, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043454

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The optimal anesthesia management for patients with stroke undergoing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) during the COVID-19 pandemic has become a matter of controversy. Some recent guidelines have favored general anesthesia (GA) in patients perceived as high risk for intraprocedural conversion from sedation to GA, including those with dominant hemispheric occlusions/aphasia or baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score >15. We aim to identify the rate and predictors of conversion to GA during MT in a high-volume center where monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is the default modality. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained MT database from January 2013 to July 2020 was undertaken. Analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of intraprocedural conversion to GA. In addition, we analyzed the GA conversion rates in subgroups of interest. RESULTS: Among 1919 MT patients, 1681 (87.6%) started treatment under MAC (median age 65 years (IQR 55-76); baseline NIHSS 16 (IQR 11-21); 48.4% women). Of the 1677 eligible patients, 26 (1.6%) converted to GA including 1.4% (22/1615) with anterior and 6.5% (4/62) with posterior circulation strokes. The only predictor of GA conversion was posterior circulation stroke (OR 4.99, 95% CI 1.67 to 14.96, P=0.004). The conversion rates were numerically higher in right than in left hemispheric occlusions (1.6% vs 1.2%; OR 1.37, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.19, P=0.47) and in milder than in more severe strokes (NIHSS ≤15 vs >15: 2% vs 1.2%; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.36, P=0.23). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the overall rate of conversion from MAC to GA during MT was low (1.6%) and, while higher in posterior circulation strokes, it was not predicted by either hemispheric dominance or stroke severity. Caution should be given before changing clinical practice during moments of crisis.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Aged , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome , United States
8.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 1-2, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030104
9.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(2): 178-184, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975760

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We examined the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on our regional stroke thrombectomy service in the UK. METHODS: This was a single-center health service evaluation. We began testing for COVID-19 on 3 March and introduced a modified "COVID Stroke Thrombectomy Pathway" on 18 March. We analyzed the clinical, procedural and outcome data for 61 consecutive stroke thrombectomy patients between 1 January and 30 April. We compared the data for January and February ("pre-COVID," n = 33) versus March and April ("during COVID," n = 28). RESULTS: Patient demographics were similar between the 2 groups (mean age 71 ± 12.8 years, 39% female). During the COVID-19 pandemic, (a) total stroke admissions fell by 17% but the thrombectomy rate was maintained at 20% of ischemic strokes; (b) successful recanalization rate was maintained at 81%; (c) early neurological outcomes (neurological improvement following thrombectomy and inpatient mortality) were not significantly different; (d) use of general anesthesia fell significantly from 85 to 32% as intended; and (e) time intervals from onset to arrival, groin puncture, and recanalization were not significantly different, whereas internal delays for external referrals significantly improved for door-to-groin puncture (48 [interquartile range (IQR) 39-57] vs. 33 [IQR 27-44] minutes, p = 0.013) and door-to-recanalization (82.5 [IQR 61-110] vs. 60 [IQR 55-70] minutes, p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on the stroke admission numbers but not stroke thrombectomy rate, successful recanalization rate, or early neurological outcome. Internal delays actually improved during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further studies should examine the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on longer term outcome.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19/complications , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , COVID-19/surgery , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/mortality , Thrombectomy/methods , Time-to-Treatment , United Kingdom
10.
11.
J Emerg Med ; 60(2): 229-236, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894015

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (2019-nCOV) appeared in China and precipitously extended across the globe. As always, natural disasters or infectious disease outbreaks have the potential to cause emergency department (ED) volume changes. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the influence of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on ED visits and the impact on the handling of patients requiring urgent revascularization. METHODS: We reviewed the charts of all patients presenting to the ED of Hospital Sainte Anne (Toulon, France) from March 23 to April 5, 2020 and compared them with those of the same period in 2019. Then we analyzed complementary data on acute coronary syndrome (ST-elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction [NSTEMI]) and neurovascular emergencies (strokes and transient ischemic attacks). RESULTS: The total number of visits decreased by 47%. The number of people assessed as triage level 2 was 8% lower in 2020. There were five fewer cases of NSTEMI in 2020, but the same number of STEMI. The number of neurovascular emergencies increased (27 cases in 2019 compared with 30 in 2020). We observed a reduction in the delay between arrival at the ED and the beginning of coronary angiography for STEMI cases (27 min in 2019 and 22 min in 2020). In 2020, 7 more stroke patients were admitted. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic probably dissuaded "non-critical" patients from coming to the hospital, whereas the same number of patients with a critical illness attended the ED as attended prior to the pandemic. There does not seem to have been any effect of the pandemic on patients requiring reperfusion therapy (STEMI and stroke).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitals, Military , Humans , Ischemic Attack, Transient/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Stroke/surgery , Triage
12.
Stroke Vasc Neurol ; 5(4): 323-330, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-852719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and physical distancing guidelines have compelled stroke practices worldwide to reshape their delivery of care significantly. We aimed to illustrate how the stroke services were interrupted during the pandemic in China. METHODS: A 61-item questionnaire designed on Wenjuanxing Form was completed by doctors or nurses who were involved in treating patients with stroke from 1 February to 31 March 2020. RESULTS: A total of 415 respondents completed the online survey after informed consent was obtained. Of the respondents, 37.8%, 35.2% and 27.0% were from mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively. Overall, the proportion of severe impact (reduction >50%) on the admission of transient ischaemic stroke, acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) was 45.0%, 32.0% and 27.5%, respectively. Those numbers were 36.9%, 27.9% and 22.3%; 36.5%, 22.1% and 22.6%; and 66.4%, 47.5% and 41.1% in mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively (all p<0.0001). For AIS, thrombolysis was moderate (20%-50% reduction) or severely impacted (>50%), as reported by 54.4% of the respondents, while thrombectomy was 39.3%. These were 44.4%, 26.3%; 44.2%, 39.4%; and 78.2%, 56.5%, in mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively (all p<0.0001). For patients with acute ICH, 39.8% reported the impact was severe or moderate for those eligible for surgery who had surgery. Those numbers were 27.4%, 39.0% and 58.1% in mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively. For staff resources, about 20% (overall) to 55% (severe epidemic) of the respondents reported moderate or severe impact on the on-duty doctors and nurses. CONCLUSION: We found a significant reduction of admission for all types of patients with stroke during the pandemic. Patients were less likely to receive appropriate care, for example, thrombolysis/thrombectomy, after being admitted to the hospital. Stroke service in severe COVID-19 epidemic areas, for example, Wuhan, was much more severely impacted compared with other regions in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Patient Care Management , Stroke/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thrombolytic Therapy/statistics & numerical data
13.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 12(11): 1049-1052, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-809207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Academic physicians aim to provide clinical and surgical care to their patients while actively contributing to a growing body of scientific literature. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in procedural-based specialties across the United States witnessing a sharp decline in their clinical volume and surgical cases. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of COVID-19 on neurosurgical, stroke neurology, and neurointerventional academic productivity. METHODS: The study compared the neurosurgical, stroke neurology, and neurointerventional academic output during the pandemic lockdown with the same time period in previous years. Editors from a sample of neurosurgical, stroke neurology, and neurointerventional journals provided the total number of original manuscript submissions, broken down by months, from the year 2016 to 2020. Manuscript submission was used as a surrogate metric for academic productivity. RESULTS: 8 journals were represented. The aggregated data from all eight journals as a whole showed that a combined average increase of 42.3% was observed on original submissions for 2020. As the average yearly percent increase using the 2016-2019 data for each journal exhibited a combined average increase of 11.2%, the rise in the yearly increase for 2020 in comparison was nearly fourfold. For the same journals in the same time period, the average percent of COVID-19 related publications from January to June of 2020 was 6.87%. CONCLUSION: There was a momentous increase in the number of original submissions for the year 2020, and its effects were uniformly experienced across all of our represented journals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Efficiency , Neurology/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Research/statistics & numerical data , Stroke/physiopathology , Stroke/surgery , Universities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Humans , Neurosurgery/trends , Periodicals as Topic , Publishing , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Research/trends , Universities/trends
15.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 12(11): 1045-1048, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807808

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the outcome of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients who received endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) with confirmed COVID-19 to those without. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis using the Vizient Clinical Data Base and included hospital discharges from April 1 to July 31 2020 with ICD-10 codes for AIS and EVT. The primary outcome was in-hospital death and the secondary outcome was favorable discharge, defined as discharge home or to acute rehabilitation. We compared patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 to those without. As a sensitivity analysis, we compared COVID-19 AIS patients who did not undergo EVT to those who did, to balance potential adverse events inherent to COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: We identified 3165 AIS patients who received EVT during April to July 2020, in which COVID-19 was confirmed in 104 (3.3%). Comorbid COVID-19 infection was associated with younger age, male sex, diabetes, black race, Hispanic ethnicity, intubation, acute coronary syndrome, acute renal failure, and longer hospital and intensive care unit length of stay. The rate of in-hospital death was 12.4% without COVID-19 vs 29.8% with COVID-19 (P<0.001). In mixed-effects logistic regression that accounted for patient clustering by hospital, comorbid COVID-19 increased the odds of in-hospital death over four-fold (OR 4.48, 95% CI 3.02 to 6.165). Comorbid COVID-19 was also associated with lower odds of a favorable discharge (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.61). In the sensitivity analysis, comparing AIS patients with COVID-19 who did not undergo EVT (n=2139) to the AIS EVT patients with COVID-19, there was no difference in the rate of in-hospital death (30.6% vs 29.8%, P=0.868), and AIS EVT patients had a higher rate of favorable discharge (32.4% vs 47.1%, P=0.002). CONCLUSION: In AIS patients treated with EVT, comorbid COVID-19 infection was associated with in-hospital death and a lower odds of favorable discharge compared with patients without COVID-19, but not compared with AIS patients with COVID-19 who did not undergo EVT. AIS EVT patients with COVID-19 were younger, more likely to be male, have systemic complications, and almost twice as likely to be black and over three times as likely to be Hispanic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/complications , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Stroke Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
16.
BMC Neurol ; 20(1): 358, 2020 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic is associated with an increased incidence of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) secondary to large vessel occlusion (LVO). The treatment of these patients poses unique and significant challenges to health care providers requiring changes in existing protocols. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old COVID-19 positive patient developed sudden onset left hemiparesis secondary to an acute right middle cerebral artery occlusion (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score = 11). Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) was performed under a new protocol specifically designed to maximize protective measures for the team involved in the care of the patient. Mechanical Thrombectomy was performed successfully under general anesthesia resulting in TICI 3 recanalization. With regards to time metrics, time from door to reperfusion was 60 mins. The 24-h NIHSS score decreased to 2. Patient was discharged after 19 days after improvement of her pulmonary status with modified Rankin Scale = 1. CONCLUSION: Patients infected by COVID-19 can develop LVO that is multifactorial in etiology. Mechanical thrombectomy in a COVID-19 confirmed patient presenting with AIS due to LVO is feasible with current mechanical thrombectomy devices. A change in stroke workflow and protocols is now necessary in order to deliver the appropriate life-saving therapy for COVID-19 positive patients while protecting medical providers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/surgery , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombectomy/methods , Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19 , Cerebral Angiography , Computed Tomography Angiography , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/complications , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Intubation, Intratracheal , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reperfusion , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
17.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 41(11): 2012-2016, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725341

ABSTRACT

We performed a retrospective review in both comprehensive stroke units of a region affected early by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, between March 1 and April 26, 2020, including patients with COVID-19 who underwent mechanical thrombectomy for ischemic stroke. We identified 13 cases, representing 38.2% of 34 thrombectomies performed during this period. We observed increased mortality and a high incidence of thrombotic complications during hospitalization. Given the high rate of infected patients, systematic use of full personal protection measures seems justified.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , France , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
18.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 41(10): 1849-1855, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724309

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Chest CT is a rapid, useful additional screening tool for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in emergent procedures. We describe the feasibility and interim outcome of implementing a modified imaging algorithm for COVID-19 risk stratification across a regional network of primary stroke centers in the work-up of acute ischemic stroke referrals for time-critical mechanical thrombectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We undertook a retrospective review of 49 patients referred to the regional neuroscience unit for consideration of mechanical thrombectomy between April 14, 2020, and May 21, 2020. During this time, all referring units followed a standard imaging protocol that included a chest CT in addition to a head CT and CT angiogram to identify Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infective pulmonary changes. RESULTS: Overall, 2 patients had typical COVID-19 radiologic features and tested positive, while 7 patients had indeterminate imaging findings and tested negative. The others had normal or atypical changes and were not diagnosed with or suspected of having COVID-19. There was an overall sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 74.1%, negative predictive value of 100%, and positive predictive value of 22.2% when using chest CT to diagnose COVID-19 in comparison with the real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction test. The mean additional time and radiation dose incurred for the chest CT were 184 ± 65.5 seconds and 2.47 ± 1.03 mSv. Multiple cardiovascular and pulmonary incidental findings of clinical relevance were identified in our patient population. CONCLUSIONS: Chest CT provides a pragmatic, rapid additional tool for COVID-19 risk stratification among patients referred for mechanical thrombectomy. Its inclusion in a standardized regional stroke imaging protocol has enabled efficient use of hospital resources with minimal compromise or delay to the overall patient treatment schedule.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/etiology , Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
19.
J Neuroimaging ; 30(5): 555-561, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-703640

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) as the name suggests was initially thought to only cause a respiratory illness. However, several reports have been published of patients with ischemic strokes in the setting of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The mechanisms of how SARS-CoV-2 results in blood clots and large vessel strokes need to be defined as it has therapeutic implications. SARS-CoV-2 enters the blood stream by breaching the blood-air barrier via the lung capillary adjacent to the alveolus, and then attaches to the angiotensin-converting enzyme II receptors on the endothelial cells. Once SARS-CoV-2 enters the blood stream, a cascade of events (Steps 1-8) unfolds including accumulation of angiotensin II, reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, oxidation of beta 2 glycoprotein 1, formation of antiphospholipid antibody complexes promoting platelet aggregation, coagulation cascade, and formation of cross-linked fibrin blood clots, leading to pulmonary emboli (PE) and large vessel strokes seen on angiographic imaging studies. There is emerging evidence for COVID-19 being a blood clotting disorder and SARS-CoV-2 using the respiratory route to enter the blood stream. As the blood-air barrier is breached, varying degrees of collateral damage occur. Although antiviral and immune therapies are studied, the role of blood thinners in the prevention, and management of blood clots in Covid-19 need evaluation. In addition to ventilators and blood thinners, continuous aspiration and clot retrieval devices (approved in Europe, cleared in the United States) or cyclical aspiration devices (approved in Europe) need to be considered for the emergent management of life-threatening clots including PE and large vessel strokes.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/etiology , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19 , Endothelial Cells , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy
20.
Clin Radiol ; 75(10): 795.e7-795.e13, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-643322

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe evolving practices in the provision of mechanical thrombectomy (MT) services across the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic, the responses of and impact on MT teams, and the effects on training. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The UK Neurointerventional Group (UKNG) and the British Society of Neuroradiologists (BSNR) sent out a national survey on 1 May 2020 to all 28 UK neuroscience centres that have the potential capability to perform MT. RESULTS: Responses were received from 27/28 MT-capable centres (96%). Three of the 27 centres do not currently provide MT services. There was a 27.7% reduction in MTs performed during April 2020 compared with the first 3 months of the year. All MT patients in 20/24 centres that responded were considered as COVID-19 suspicious/positive unless or until proven otherwise. Twenty-two of the 24 centres reported delays to the patient pathway. Seventeen of the 24 centres reported that the COVID-19 pandemic had reduced training opportunities for specialist registrars (SpR). Fourteen of the 24 centres reported that the pandemic had hampered their development plans for their local or regional MT service. CONCLUSION: The present survey has highlighted a trend of decreasing cases and delays in the patient pathway during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic across UK centres.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Mechanical Thrombolysis/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Stroke/surgery , Brain Ischemia/complications , COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Humans , United Kingdom
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