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2.
Neurol India ; 70(5): 1942-1946, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117614

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The unprecedented challenges during the COVID pandemic and the subsequent lockdown had resulted in a delay in treatment metrics for acute stroke. There is a rising concern that COVID-19 co-infection can adversely affect stroke outcome. We aim to investigate the impact of COVID-19 in the management of stroke patients. We also compared the differences in stroke manifestations, etiological pattern, treatment course, and outcome of acute stroke patients in COVID-19 confirmed cases. Methodology: A single-center retrospective study was done at the Stroke Unit, Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram. Consecutive patients of acute stroke confirmed by imaging, presenting within 24 hours of the onset of symptoms in May to July 2020 and May to July 2019, were included. The primary data variables included baseline demographics, risk factors, admission NIHSS, stroke timings, thrombolysis rate, TOAST etiology, mRS at discharge, and in-hospital mortality. Results: Strokes with higher NIHSS, arrival blood sugar and blood pressure, and delays in door-to-CT and door-to-needle time were more during the pandemic. Intravenous thrombolysis was less and mortality was higher in COVID-19 strokes during the pandemic. COVID-19-positive stroke patients had more hemorrhagic strokes, more severe strokes with low CT ASPECTS, more hemorrhagic transformation, high in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome at discharge and 3 months. Conclusion: Our study was a hypothesis-generating study with a limited number of patients. This study has reconfirmed the higher severity of the stroke, with a higher mRS score and mortality during the pandemic, especially among COVID-19-positive stroke patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Humans , Tertiary Care Centers , Retrospective Studies , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome , Communicable Disease Control , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects
3.
Curr Vasc Pharmacol ; 20(4): 333-340, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098971

ABSTRACT

The neurological complications of Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) including stroke have been documented in the recent literature. COVID-19-related inflammation is suggested to contribute to both a hypercoagulable state and haemorrhagic transformation, including in younger individuals. COVID-19 is associated with a heightened risk of ischaemic stroke. Haemorrhagic stroke in COVID-19 patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) accounts for <1% of stroke cases in the general population but has come to heightened public attention due to the increased risk associated with adenoviral COVID-19 vaccines. However, recent evidence suggests the prevalence of stroke is less in vaccinated individuals than in unvaccinated COVID-19 patients. This review evaluates the current evidence of COVID-19-related ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, with a focus on current epidemiology and inflammatory-linked pathophysiology in the field of vascular neurology and stroke medicine.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Hemorrhagic Stroke , Stroke , Humans , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Brain Ischemia/etiology , COVID-19 Vaccines
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066092

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mobile health (mHealth) has been considered as a prominent concept in digital health and is widely used and easily accessible. Periodic follow-up visits, previously planned procedures, and rehabilitation services for stroke survivors have been cut down during the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, in this qualitative study we aimed to explore the need for a mobile application in stroke management by informal caregivers. METHODS: A phenomenological qualitative study was conducted from November 2020 to June 2021. Thirteen respondents were recruited from two public rehabilitation centers in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia. In-depth interviews were conducted. A comprehensive representation of perspectives from the respondents was achieved through purposive sampling. The interviews were conducted in the Kelantanese dialect, recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Thirteen participants were involved in the interviews. All of them agreed with the need for a mobile application in stroke management. They believed the future stroke application will help them to seek information, continuous stroke home care, and help in the welfare of caregivers and stroke patients. CONCLUSIONS: The current study revealed two themes with respective subthemes that were identified, namely, self-seeking for information and reasons for using a stroke mobile application in the future. This application helps in reducing healthcare costs, enhancing the rehabilitation process, facilitating patient engagement in decision making, and the continuous monitoring of patient health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Caregivers , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Stroke/therapy , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods
6.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275831, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065149

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Only very few studies have investigated the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the pre-hospital stroke code protocol. During the first wave, Spain was one of the most affected countries by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus disease pandemic. This health catastrophe overshadowed other pathologies, such as acute stroke, the leading cause of death among women and the leading cause of disability among adults. Any interference in the stroke code protocol can delay the administration of reperfusion treatment for acute ischemic strokes, leading to a worse patient prognosis. We aimed to compare the performance of the stroke code during the first wave of the pandemic with the same period of the previous year. METHODS: This was a multicentre interrupted time-series observational study of the cohort of stroke codes of SUMMA 112 and of the ten hospitals with a stroke unit in the Community of Madrid. We established two groups according to the date on which they were attended: the first during the dates with the highest daily cumulative incidence of the first wave of the COVID-19 (from February 27 to June 15, 2020), and the second, the same period of the previous year (from February 27 to June 15, 2019). To assess the performance of the stroke code, we compared each of the pre-hospital emergency service time periods, the diagnostic accuracy (proportion of stroke codes with a final diagnosis of acute stroke out of the total), the proportion of patients treated with reperfusion therapies, and the in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: SUMMA 112 activated the stroke code in 966 patients (514 in the pre-pandemic group and 452 pandemic). The call management time increased by 9% (95% CI: -0.11; 0.91; p value = 0.02), and the time on scene increased by 12% (95% CI: 2.49; 5.93; p value = <0.01). Diagnostic accuracy, and the proportion of patients treated with reperfusion therapies remained stable. In-hospital mortality decreased by 4% (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the first wave, a prolongation of the time "on the scene" of the management of the 112 calls, and of the hospital admission was observed. Prehospital diagnostic accuracy and the proportion of patients treated at the hospital level with intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy were not altered with respect to the previous year, showing the resilience of the stroke network and the emergency medical service.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Stroke , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy
7.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275673, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065144

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Unmet poststroke service needs are common among people living in the community. Community-Based Stroke Services (CBSS) have the potential to address these unmet needs, yet there are no comprehensive guidelines to inform the design of CBSS, and they remain an understudied aspect of stroke care. This study aimed to describe the perceived barriers to accessing community-based stroke services, benefits from these programs and opportunities to address unmet needs. METHODS: This was a qualitative descriptive study with interviews and focus groups conducted with people living with stroke and caregivers. Data were transcribed and analyzed thematically. RESULTS: Eighty-five individuals with stroke and caregivers participated. Four key overarching themes were identified: facilitators and barriers to accessing and participating in community-based stroke services; components of helpful and unhelpful stroke services; perceived benefits of community-based stroke services; and opportunities to address unmet stroke service needs. INTERPRETATIONS: The findings resonate with and extend prior literature, suggesting a critical need for personalized and tailored stroke services to address persistent unmet needs. We call on relevant stakeholders, such as policymakers, providers, and researchers, to move these insights into action through comprehensive guidelines, practice standards and interventions to personalize and tailor CBSS.


Subject(s)
Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Caregivers , Community Health Services , Humans , Qualitative Research , Stroke/therapy , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods
8.
CMAJ Open ; 10(4): E865-E871, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increase in telemedicine use. We compared care and outcomes in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor ischemic stroke before and after the widespread adoption of telemedicine in Ontario, Canada, in 2020. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study using linked administrative data, we identified patients with TIA or ischemic stroke discharged from any emergency department in Ontario before the widespread use of telemedicine (Apr. 1, 2015, to Mar. 31, 2020) and after (Apr. 1, 2020, to Mar. 31, 2021). We measured care, including visits with a physician, investigations and medication renewal. We compared 90-day death before and after 2020 using Cox proportional hazards models, and we compared 90-day admission using cause-specific hazard models. RESULTS: We identified 47 601 patients (49.3% female; median age 73, interquartile range 62-82, yr) with TIA (n = 35 695, 75.0%) or ischemic stroke (n = 11 906, 25.0%). After 2020, 83.1% of patients had 1 or more telemedicine visit within 90 days of emergency department discharge, compared with 3.8% before. The overall access to outpatient visits within 90 days remained unchanged (92.9% before v. 94.0% after; risk difference 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.3 to 3.5). Investigations and medication renewals were unchanged. Clinical outcomes were also similar before and after 2020; the adjusted hazard ratio was 0.97 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.04) for 90-day all-cause admission, 1.06 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.20) for stroke admission and 1.07 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.24) for death. INTERPRETATION: Care and short-term outcomes after TIA or minor stroke remained stable after the widespread implementation of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings suggest that telemedicine is an effective method of health care delivery that can be complementary to in-person care for minor ischemic cerebrovascular events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Attack, Transient , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Telemedicine , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology , Ischemic Attack, Transient/therapy , Male , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/therapy
9.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e061025, 2022 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038306

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of changes in use of care and implementation of hospital reorganisations spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic (first wave) on the acute management times of patients who had a stroke and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). DESIGN: Two cohorts of patients who had an STEMI and stroke in the Aquitaine Cardio-Neuro-Vascular (CNV) registry. SETTING: 6 emergency medical services, 30 emergency units (EUs), 14 hospitalisation units and 11 cathlabs in the Aquitaine region. PARTICIPANTS: This study involved 9218 patients (6436 patients who had a stroke and 2782 patients who had an STEMI) in the CNV Registry from January 2019 to August 2020. METHOD: Hospital reorganisations, retrieved in a scoping review, were collected from heads of hospital departments. Other data were from the CNV Registry. Associations between reorganisations, use of care and care management times were analysed using multivariate linear regression mixed models. Interaction terms between use-of-care variables and period (pre-wave, per-wave and post-wave) were introduced. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: STEMI cohort, first medical contact-to-procedure time; stroke cohort, EU admission-to-imaging time. RESULTS: Per-wave period management times deteriorated for stroke but were maintained for STEMI. Per-wave changes in use of care did not affect STEMI management. No association was found between reorganisations and stroke management times. In the STEMI cohort, the implementation of systematic testing at admission was associated with a 41% increase in care management time (exp=1.409, 95% CI 1.075 to 1.848, p=0.013). Implementation of plan blanc, which concentrated resources in emergency activities, was associated with a 19% decrease in management time (exp=0.801, 95% CI 0.639 to 1.023, p=0.077). CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic did not markedly alter the functioning of the emergency network. Although stroke patient management deteriorated, the resilience of the STEMI pathway was linked to its stronger structuring. Transversal reorganisations, aiming at concentrating resources on emergency care, contributed to maintenance of the quality of care. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04979208.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Registries , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 31(11): 106716, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036331

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess whether COVID-19 could be a concurrent factor in the genesis and/or worsening of stroke and to provide data on COVID-19 -associated stroke patients during the first pandemic wave and comparative data on COVID-19 negative stroke patients in the same period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective, observational, case-control, single centre study, carried out in a General Hospital in northern Italy. Sixty-three consecutive stroke patients were included, COVID-19-associated stroke was classified as cases and non COVID-19-associated stroke as controls. RESULTS: A total of 19/63 (28.8%) had a COVID-19-associated stroke, 11 /63 (17.5%) were haemorrhagic and 52/63 (82.5%) ischaemic. COVID-19-associated strokes were more severe (p-value 0.019) and had a higher risk of severe disability and/or death (OR 3.79, CI 95%: 1.21-11.93, p-value 0.19). The COVID-19-associated stroke patients with onset during hospitalization for COVID-19 had a more severe stroke than patients with COVID-19 onset during hospitalization for stroke (p-value 0.019). CONCLUSION: Although no relationship was observed between the stroke aetiology and COVID-19, intriguingly, COVID-associated stroke turned out to be more severe and disabling. Hopefully, further studies will provide more data and help in the management of this emerging population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Stroke , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Case-Control Studies , Pandemics , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , Stroke/complications , Retrospective Studies , Communicable Diseases/complications
11.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 34(4)2022 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029047

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected health-care systems worldwide, leading to fewer admissions and raising concerns about the quality of care. The objective of this study was to investigate the early effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on quality of care among stroke and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients, focusing on clinical outcomes and direct treatment costs. METHOD: This retrospective, observational study was based on the 10-week period that included the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Israel (15 February 2020-30 April 2020). Emergency department admissions for stroke and STEMI were compared with parallel periods in 2017-2019, focusing on demographics, risk and severity scores, and the effect of clinical outcomes on hospitalization costs. RESULTS: The 634 stroke and 186 STEMI cases comprised 16% and 19% fewer admissions, respectively, compared to 2019. No significant changes were detected in demographics, most disease management parameters, readmission and mortality outcomes. The mean door-to-balloon time increased insignificantly by 33%, lowering the health quality indicator (HQI) for treatment in <90 min from 94.7% in 2017-2019 to 83% in 2020 (P = 0.022). Among suspected stroke patients, 97.2% underwent imaging, with 28% longer median time from admission (P = 0.05). Consequently, only 24.3% met the HQI of imaging in <29 min, compared to 45.5% in 2017-2019 (P < 0.01). Increased length of stay and more intensive care unit admissions were the leading causes of 6.5% increased mean cost of STEMI patients' initial hospitalization, which totaled $29 300 in the COVID-19 period (P = 0.008). CONCLUSION: The initial pandemic period caused a decline in HQIs linked to diagnostic and treatment protocols, without changes in outcomes, but with increased hospitalization costs. Medical information and awareness of life-threatening conditions among patients and caregivers should be increased to enable proper diagnosis and management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Treatment Outcome
12.
Stroke ; 53(8): 2658-2661, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009246
13.
Stroke ; 53(9): 2967-2975, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009245

ABSTRACT

As stroke continues to represent a major global health care problem, advancing our knowledge of new effective and safe stroke interventions represents a public health priority. The identification of these therapies requires the conduct of high-quality and well-powered randomized clinical trials. Despite its potential to inform clinical practice, traditional randomized clinical trial models have their drawbacks, including elevated costs, long completion times, failure to recruit the target sample sizes, lack of diversity, and complex operational procedures. Therefore, improving the participants' experience and trials' overall efficiency constitutes an important unmet need. Innovative models such as virtual and decentralized patient-centric trials have been proposed as a valuable strategy in this pursuit. In this narrative review, we discuss the limitations of traditional randomized clinical trial models and present the concept, advantages, and challenges of decentralized digitally enabled approaches to the conduct of stroke clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Stroke , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Sample Size , Stroke/therapy
14.
Eur Heart J ; 43(26): 2442-2460, 2022 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2008562

ABSTRACT

The management of patients with stroke is often multidisciplinary, involving various specialties and healthcare professionals. Given the common shared risk factors for stroke and cardiovascular disease, input may also be required from the cardiovascular teams, as well as patient caregivers and next-of-kin. Ultimately, the patient is central to all this, requiring a coordinated and uniform approach to the priorities of post-stroke management, which can be consistently implemented by different multidisciplinary healthcare professionals, as part of the patient 'journey' or 'patient pathway,' supported by appropriate education and tele-medicine approaches. All these aspects would ultimately aid delivery of care and improve patient (and caregiver) engagement and empowerment. Given the need to address the multidisciplinary approach to holistic or integrated care of patients with heart disease and stroke, the European Society of Cardiology Council on Stroke convened a Task Force, with the remit to propose a consensus on Integrated care management for optimizing the management of stroke and associated heart disease. The present position paper summarizes the available evidence and proposes consensus statements that may help to define evidence gaps and simple practical approaches to assist in everyday clinical practice. A post-stroke ABC pathway is proposed, as a more holistic approach to integrated stroke care, would include three pillars of management: A: Appropriate Antithrombotic therapy.B: Better functional and psychological status.C: Cardiovascular risk factors and Comorbidity optimization (including lifestyle changes).


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Cardiology , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Heart Diseases , Stroke , Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , Humans , Stroke/therapy
15.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1036, 2022 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute ischemic stroke requires early medical imaging with a computed tomography (CT) scan and immediate thrombolysis treatment. In rural areas, the long distance to the nearest hospital reduce the patients' probability of receiving medical assistance within the 4.5-h period. The aim of this study was to assess how the service was set-up, and how managers and personnel experience the organisation and value of a rural telemedicine, remote controlled CT stroke service. METHODS: Ten semi-structured individual interviews and one semi-structured focus group interview were conducted. The sample included 15 participants involved in the telemedicine service in Hallingdal, Norway. The interview guide consisted of questions on the service, experience of working with the service, value and quality, management, and challenges. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic content analysis was used to develop a narrative of the findings. RESULTS: Findings were categorised into three main categories; value of the service, organisation of the project, and from project to permanent service. Participants perceived the service to be valuable for patients and the local community. The service included task shifting from radiographers and junior doctors to the local paramedics. To enable long- term operation of the service the participants suggested management, coordination, and continuous training as important factors. CONCLUSIONS: The service was perceived as valuable to the local community, providing a sense of healthcare security and equitability. Management's involvement, flexibility, and coordination appears to be a key factor for successful implementation and long-term sustainability of the service.


Subject(s)
Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Telemedicine , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Qualitative Research , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/therapy
16.
J Med Eng Technol ; 46(6): 433-447, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001047

ABSTRACT

This paper provides an overview of the usability engineering process and relevant standards informing the development of medical devices, together with adaptations to accommodate situations such as global pandemics where use of traditional face-to-face methods is restricted. To highlight some of those adaptations, a case study of a project developing a novel electronic rehabilitation device is referenced, which commenced in November 2020 amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. The Sheffield Adaptive Patterned Electrical Stimulation (SHAPES) project, led by Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (STH), aimed to design, manufacture and trial an intervention for use to treat upper arm spasticity after stroke. Presented is an outline and discussion of the challenges experienced in developing the SHAPES health technology intended for at-home use by stroke survivors and in implementing usability engineering approaches. Also highlighted, are the benefits that arose, which can offer easier involvement of vulnerable users and add flexibility in the ways that user feedback is sought. Challenges included: restricted travel; access to usual prototyping facilities; social distancing; infection prevention and control; availability of components; and changing work pressures and demands. Whereas benefits include: less travel; less time commitment; and greater scope for participants with restricted mobility to participate in the process. The paper advocates a more flexible approach to usability engineering and outlines the onward path for development and trialling of the SHAPES technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Arm , Humans , Pandemics , Stroke/therapy
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994040

ABSTRACT

After discharge from the hospital to home, stroke patients may experience weakness and reduced movement in their hemiparetic arms that limits their ability to perform daily activities. Therapists can use exercise games (exergames) to maintain functional abilities and daily use of the arm at home. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to determine the efficiency of upper limb home-based rehabilitation, using exergaming on activity abilities in stroke.&nbsp;Randomized controlled trials were reviewed in the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and SCOPUS online databases. Clinical measures of observation and self-reporting were studied in post-intervention and follow-up. Nine studies were included in this systematic review (535 participants). The Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) score was 6.6/10 (SD 1.0, range 5-8), indicating good quality. This systematic review and meta-analysis showed that upper limb home-based exergaming interventions were no more effective in terms of activity than conventional therapy after stroke, according to the observational and subjective assessments in post-intervention and follow-up. Using this same approach, future studies should focus on evaluating home-based exergames through subgroup analysis to be able to propose recommendations.


Subject(s)
Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Activities of Daily Living , Exergaming , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , Stroke/therapy , Upper Extremity
18.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(15): 5574-5580, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1988904

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has influenced regular medical procedures and health-seeking behaviors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on the presentation and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients in county-level stroke centers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively collected AIS patients during the strict lockdown period (January 24, 2020, to March 27, 2020) and the corresponding "new normal" period (2021) of the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients seen during the same timeframe in 2019 were enrolled as controls. Statistical analysis was conducted to compare the clinical characteristics of AIS patients who presented during the lockdown and new normal periods and those who presented during the pre-COVID-19 pandemic period. RESULTS: A total of 134 AIS patients presented during the lockdown period (the 2020 group), 207 patients in the pre-COVID-19 period (the 2019 group) and 201 patients in the "new normal" period (the 2021 group). Compared to the 2019 group, there was approximately 1/3 reduction in the number of patients who presented during the lockdown period, while the number of patients who received IVT or EVT was similar between the two groups. The number of patients, baseline characteristics, workflow intervals and clinical outcomes presented during the "new normal" period were similar between the 2019 and 2021 groups. Logistic regression showed that lockdown or new normal status were not risk factors associated with a poor outcome at 90 days. CONCLUSIONS: In county-level city stroke centers, the COVID-19 lockdown resulted in a reduction in the number of patients with AIS admitted to the hospital but had no effect on patients treated with IVT or EVT. Lockdown or new normal status did not influence the prognosis of AIS patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy
19.
Stroke ; 52(10): 3388-3390, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1391455
20.
BMC Emerg Med ; 22(1): 136, 2022 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962739

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate door-to-puncture time (DPT) and door-to-recanalization time (DRT) without directing healthcare by neuro-interventionalist support in the emergency department (ED) by workflow optimization and improving patients' outcomes. METHODS: Records of 98 consecutive ischemic stroke patients who had undergone endovascular therapy (EVT) between 2018 to 2021 were retrospectively reviewed in a single-center study. Patients were divided into three groups: pre-intervention (2018-2019), interim-intervention (2020), and post-intervention (January 1st 2021 to August 16th, 2021). We compared door-to-puncture time, door-to-recanalization time (DRT), puncture-to-recanalization time (PRT), last known normal time to-puncture time (LKNPT), and patient outcomes (measured by 3 months modified Rankin Scale) between three groups using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Our findings indicate that process optimization measures could shorten DPT, DRT, PRT, and LKNPT. Median LKNPT was shortened by 70 min from 325 to 255 min(P < 0.05), and DPT was shortened by 119 min from 237 to 118 min. DRT shortened by 132 min from 338 to 206 min, and PRT shortened by 33 min from 92 to 59 min from the pre-intervention to post-intervention groups (all P < 0.05). Only 21.4% of patients had a favorable outcome in the pre-intervention group as compared to 55.6% in the interventional group (P= 0.026). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that multidisciplinary cooperation was associated with shortened DPT, DRT, PRT, and LKNPT despite challenges posed to the healthcare system such as the COVID-19 pandemic. These practice paradigms may be transported to other stroke centers and healthcare providers to improve endovascular time metrics and patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/surgery , Pandemics , Punctures , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome , Workflow
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