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1.
J Virol ; 94(13)2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583223

ABSTRACT

Fusion with, and subsequent entry into, the host cell is one of the critical steps in the life cycle of enveloped viruses. For Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the spike (S) protein is the main determinant of viral entry. Proteolytic cleavage of the S protein exposes its fusion peptide (FP), which initiates the process of membrane fusion. Previous studies on the related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) FP have shown that calcium ions (Ca2+) play an important role in fusogenic activity via a Ca2+ binding pocket with conserved glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D) residues. SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV FPs share a high sequence homology, and here, we investigated whether Ca2+ is required for MERS-CoV fusion by screening a mutant array in which E and D residues in the MERS-CoV FP were substituted with neutrally charged alanines (A). Upon verifying mutant cell surface expression and proteolytic cleavage, we tested their ability to mediate pseudoparticle (PP) infection of host cells in modulating Ca2+ environments. Our results demonstrate that intracellular Ca2+ enhances MERS-CoV wild-type (WT) PP infection by approximately 2-fold and that E891 is a crucial residue for Ca2+ interaction. Subsequent electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments revealed that this enhancement could be attributed to Ca2+ increasing MERS-CoV FP fusion-relevant membrane ordering. Intriguingly, isothermal calorimetry showed an approximate 1:1 MERS-CoV FP to Ca2+ ratio, as opposed to an 1:2 SARS-CoV FP to Ca2+ ratio, suggesting significant differences in FP Ca2+ interactions of MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV FP despite their high sequence similarity.IMPORTANCE Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a major emerging infectious disease with zoonotic potential and has reservoirs in dromedary camels and bats. Since its first outbreak in 2012, the virus has repeatedly transmitted from camels to humans, with 2,468 confirmed cases causing 851 deaths. To date, there are no efficacious drugs and vaccines against MERS-CoV, increasing its potential to cause a public health emergency. In order to develop novel drugs and vaccines, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms that enable the virus to infect host cells. Our data have found that calcium is an important regulator of viral fusion by interacting with negatively charged residues in the MERS-CoV FP region. This information can guide therapeutic solutions to block this calcium interaction and also repurpose already approved drugs for this use for a fast response to MERS-CoV outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Calcium/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Ions/metabolism , Membrane Fusion , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Virus Internalization , Amino Acid Sequence , Amino Acid Substitution , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Proteolysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vero Cells , Virulence , Virus Assembly
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 795741, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581316

ABSTRACT

Glycan-masking the vaccine antigen by mutating the undesired antigenic sites with an additional N-linked glycosylation motif can refocus B-cell responses to desired epitopes, without affecting the antigen's overall-folded structure. This study examined the impact of glycan-masking mutants of the N-terminal domain (NTD) and receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2, and found that the antigenic design of the S protein increases the neutralizing antibody titers against the Wuhan-Hu-1 ancestral strain and the recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 variants Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), and Delta (B.1.617.2). Our results demonstrated that the use of glycan-masking Ad-S-R158N/Y160T in the NTD elicited a 2.8-fold, 6.5-fold, and 4.6-fold increase in the IC-50 NT titer against the Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351) and Delta (B.1.617.2) variants, respectively. Glycan-masking of Ad-S-D428N in the RBD resulted in a 3.0-fold and 2.0-fold increase in the IC-50 neutralization titer against the Alpha (B.1.1.7) and Beta (B.1.351) variants, respectively. The use of glycan-masking in Ad-S-R158N/Y160T and Ad-S-D428N antigen design may help develop universal COVID-19 vaccines against current and future emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Epitopes/immunology , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adenoviridae/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic , Female , Genetic Engineering , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Humans , Immunization , Mice , Neutralization Tests , Polysaccharides , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship
3.
J Chem Inf Model ; 61(12): 5906-5922, 2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569200

ABSTRACT

Umifenovir (Arbidol) has been reported to exhibit some degree of efficacy in multiple clinical trials for the treatment of COVID-19 as a monotherapy. It has also demonstrated synergistic inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 with other direct-acting antivirals such as Remdesivir. A computational approach was used to identify the most favorable binding site to the SARS-CoV-2 Spike S2 segment and to perform virtual screening. Compounds selected from modeling were evaluated in a live SARS-CoV-2 infection assay. An Arbidol (ARB) derivative with substitutions at both the C-4 and C-6 positions was found to exhibit a modest improvement in activity and solubility properties in comparison to ARB. However, all of the derivatives were found to only be partial inhibitors, rather than full inhibitors in a virus-induced cytopathic effect-based assay. The binding mode is also corroborated by parallel modeling of a series of oleanolic acid trisaccharide saponin fusion inhibitors shown to bind to the S2 segment. Recently determined experimental structures of the Spike protein allowed atomic resolution modeling of fusion inhibitor binding as a function of pH, and the implications for the molecular mechanism of direct-acting fusion inhibitors targeting the S2 segment are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepatitis C, Chronic , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Humans , Indoles , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Structure-Activity Relationship , Virus Internalization
4.
Mar Drugs ; 19(12)2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542656

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a major human health concern. The pathogen responsible for COVID-19, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), invades its host through the interaction of its spike (S) protein with a host cell receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In addition to ACE2, heparan sulfate (HS) on the surface of host cells also plays a significant role as a co-receptor. Our previous studies demonstrated that sulfated glycans, such as heparin and fucoidans, show anti-COVID-19 activities. In the current study, rhamnan sulfate (RS), a polysaccharide with a rhamnose backbone from a green seaweed, Monostroma nitidum, was evaluated for binding to the S-protein from SARS-CoV-2 and inhibition of viral infectivity in vitro. The structural characteristics of RS were investigated by determining its monosaccharide composition and performing two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance. RS inhibition of the interaction of heparin, a highly sulfated HS, with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (from wild type and different mutant variants) was studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In competitive binding studies, the IC50 of RS against the S-protein receptor binding domain (RBD) binding to immobilized heparin was 1.6 ng/mL, which is much lower than the IC50 for heparin (~750 ng/mL). RS showed stronger inhibition than heparin on the S-protein RBD or pseudoviral particles binding to immobilized heparin. Finally, in an in vitro cell-based assay, RS showed strong antiviral activities against wild type SARS-CoV-2 and the delta variant.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Deoxy Sugars/pharmacology , Mannans/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Seaweed , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aquatic Organisms , Deoxy Sugars/therapeutic use , Humans , Mannans/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Protein Binding/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/drug effects , Structure-Activity Relationship
5.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526851

ABSTRACT

There have been more than 150 million confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 since the beginning of the pandemic in 2019. By June 2021, the mortality from such infections approached 3.9 million people. Despite the availability of a number of vaccines which provide protection against this virus, the evolution of new viral variants, inconsistent availability of the vaccine around the world, and vaccine hesitancy, in some countries, makes it unreasonable to rely on mass vaccination alone to combat this pandemic. Consequently, much effort is directed to identifying potential antiviral treatments. Marine brominated tyrosine alkaloids are recognized to have antiviral potential. We test here the antiviral capacity of fourteen marine brominated tyrosine alkaloids against five different target proteins from SARS-CoV-2, including main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and non-structural protein 10 (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H). These marine alkaloids, particularly the hexabrominated compound, fistularin-3, shows promising docking interactions with predicted binding affinities (S-score = -7.78, -7.65, -6.39, -6.28, -8.84 Kcal/mol) for the main protease (Mpro) (PDB ID: 6lu7), spike glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYB), nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (PDB ID: 6VYO), membrane glycoprotein (PDB ID: 6M17), and non-structural protein 10 (nsp10) (PDB ID: 6W4H), respectively, where it forms better interactions with the protein pockets than the native interaction. It also shows promising molecular dynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity profiles. As such, further exploration of the antiviral properties of fistularin-3 against SARS-CoV-2 is merited.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Alkaloids/isolation & purification , Alkaloids/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Halogenation , Humans , Isoxazoles/chemistry , Isoxazoles/metabolism , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Tyrosine/analogs & derivatives , Tyrosine/chemistry , Tyrosine/metabolism
6.
Chem Commun (Camb) ; 57(93): 12476-12479, 2021 Nov 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500757

ABSTRACT

We identified small-molecule enhancers of cellular stress granules by observing molecular crowding of proteins and RNAs in a time-dependent manner. Hit molecules sensitized the IRF3-mediated antiviral mechanism in the presence of poly(I:C) and inhibited the replication of SARS-CoV-2 by inducing stress granule formation. Thus, modulating multimolecular crowding can be a promising strategy against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzopyrans/pharmacology , Cytoplasmic Granules/drug effects , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Benzopyrans/chemistry , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cytoplasmic Granules/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Combinations , Humans , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Lopinavir/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Structure , Poly I-C/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/chemistry , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vero Cells
7.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2390: 177-190, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499336

ABSTRACT

We describe an approach to early stage drug discovery that explicitly engages with the complexities of human biology. The combined computational and experimental approach is formulated on a conceptual framework in which network biology is used to bridge between individual molecular entities and the cellular phenotype that emerges when those entities interact in a network. Multiple aspects of early stage discovery are addressed including the data-driven elucidation of biological processes implicated in disease, target identification and validation, phenotypic discovery of active molecules and their mechanism of action, and extraction of genetic target support from human population genetics data. Validation is described via summary of a number of discovery projects and details from a project aimed at COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Systems Biology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Molecular Structure , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Structure-Activity Relationship
8.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2390: 103-112, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499335

ABSTRACT

The development of vaccines for the treatment of COVID-19 is paving the way for new hope. Despite this, the risk of the virus mutating into a vaccine-resistant variant still persists. As a result, the demand of efficacious drugs to treat COVID-19 is still pertinent. To this end, scientists continue to identify and repurpose marketed drugs for this new disease. Many of these drugs are currently undergoing clinical trials and, so far, only one has been officially approved by FDA. Drug repurposing is a much faster route to the clinic than standard drug development of novel molecules, nevertheless in a pandemic this process is still not fast enough to halt the spread of the virus. Artificial intelligence has already played a large part in hastening the drug discovery process, not only by facilitating the selection of potential drug candidates but also in monitoring the pandemic and enabling faster diagnosis of patients. In this chapter, we focus on the impact and challenges that artificial intelligence has demonstrated thus far with respect to drug repurposing of therapeutics for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Discovery , Drug Repositioning , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Machine Learning , Molecular Structure , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Structure-Activity Relationship
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470891

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, represents a new pathogen from the family of Coronaviridae that caused a global pandemic of COVID-19 disease. In the absence of effective antiviral drugs, research of novel therapeutic targets such as SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) becomes essential. This viral protein is without a human counterpart and thus represents a unique prospective drug target. However, in vitro biological evaluation testing on RdRp remains difficult and is not widely available. Therefore, we prepared a database of commercial small-molecule compounds and performed an in silico high-throughput virtual screening on the active site of the SARS-CoV-2 RdRp using ensemble docking. We identified a novel thioether-amide or guanidine-linker class of potential RdRp inhibitors and calculated favorable binding free energies of representative hits by molecular dynamics simulations coupled with Linear Interaction Energy calculations. This innovative procedure maximized the respective phase-space sampling and yielded non-covalent inhibitors representing small optimizable molecules that are synthetically readily accessible, commercially available as well as suitable for further biological evaluation and mode of action studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Databases, Chemical , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Guanidine/chemistry , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Structure-Activity Relationship , Sulfides/chemistry , Thermodynamics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
10.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463774

ABSTRACT

A series of novel naphthopyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidin-11(12H)-one containing isoxazole nucleus 4 was synthesized under microwave irradiation and classical conditions in moderate to excellent yields upon 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction using various arylnitrile oxides under copper(I) catalyst. A one-pot, three-component reaction, N-propargylation and Dimroth rearrangement were used as the key steps for the preparation of the dipolarophiles3. The structures of the synthesized compounds were established by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HRMS-ES means. The present study aims to also predict the theoretical assembly of the COVID-19 protease (SARS-CoV-2 Mpro) and to discover in advance whether this protein can be targeted by the compounds 4a-1 and thus be synthesized. The docking scores of these compounds were compared to those of the co-crystallized native ligand inhibitor (N3) which was used as a reference standard. The results showed that all the synthesized compounds (4a-l) gave interesting binding scores compared to those of N3 inhibitor. It was found that compounds 4a, 4e and 4i achieved greatly similar binding scores and modes of interaction than N3, indicating promising affinity towards SARS-CoV-2 Mpro. On the other hand, the derivatives 4k, 4h and 4j showed binding energy scores (-8.9, -8.5 and -8.4 kcal/mol, respectively) higher than the Mpro N3 inhibitor (-7.0 kcal/mol), revealing, in their turn, a strong interaction with the target protease, although their interactions were not entirely comparable to that of the reference N3.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Drug Design , Isoxazoles/chemistry , Pyrimidinones/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Click Chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Humans , Microwaves , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Structure-Activity Relationship , Thermodynamics
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463709

ABSTRACT

Cancer persists as a global challenge due to the extent to which conventional anticancer therapies pose high risks counterbalanced with their therapeutic benefit. Naturally occurring substances stand as an important safer alternative source for anticancer drug development. In the current study, a series of modified lupane and ursane derivatives was subjected to in vitro screening on the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel. Compounds 6 and 7 have been identified as highly active with GI50 values ranging from 0.03 µM to 5.9 µM (compound 6) and 0.18-1.53 µM (compound 7). Thus, these two compounds were further assessed in detail in order to identify a possible antiproliferative mechanism of action. DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining revealed that both compounds induced nuclei condensation and overall cell morphological changes consistent with apoptotic cell death. rtPCR analysis showed that both compounds induced upregulation of proapoptotic Bak and Bad genes while downregulating Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 antiapoptotic genes. Molecular docking analysis revealed that both compounds exhibited high scores for Bcl-XL inhibition, while compound 7 showed higher in silico Bcl-XL inhibition potential as compared to the native inhibitor ATB-737, suggesting that compounds may induce apoptotic cell death through targeted antiapoptotic protein inhibition, as well.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Biological Products/pharmacology , Triterpenes/pharmacology , Angiogenesis Inhibitors , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Biological Products/chemistry , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Humans , Models, Molecular , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Structure , Protein Binding , Structure-Activity Relationship , Triterpenes/chemistry
12.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 7251119, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455778

ABSTRACT

Background: B.1.617.1, a variant of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing respiratory illness is responsible for the second wave of COVID-19 and associated with a high incidence of infectivity and mortality. To mitigate the B.1.617.1 variant of SARS-CoV-2, deciphering the protein structure and immunological responses by employing bioinformatics tools for data mining and analysis is pivotal. Objectives: Here, an in silico approach was employed for deciphering the structure and immune function of the subunit of spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.1 variant. Methods: The partial amino acid sequence of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.1 variant S protein was analyzed, and its putative secondary and tertiary structure was predicted. Immunogenic analyses including B- and T-cell epitopes, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) response, chemokine, and protective antigens for SARS-CoV 2 S proteins were predicted using appropriate tools. Results: B.1.617.1 variant S protein sequence was found to be highly stable and amphipathic. ABCpred and CTLpred analyses led to the identification of two potential antigenic B cell and T cell epitopes with starting amino acid positions at 60 and 82 (for B cell epitopes) and 54 and 98 (for T cell epitopes) having prediction scores > 0.8. Further, RAMPAGE tool was used for determining the allowed and disallowed regions of the three-dimensional predicted structure of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.1 variant S protein. Conclusion: Together, the in silico analysis revealed the predicted structure of partial S protein, immunogenic properties, and possible regions for S protein of SARS-CoV-2 and provides a valuable prelude for engineering the targeted vaccine or drug against B.1.617.1 variant of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Algorithms , Amino Acid Sequence , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Computational Biology/methods , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Protein Binding , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Viral Vaccines/immunology
13.
Curr Drug Discov Technol ; 17(1): 30-44, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453168

ABSTRACT

The anti-infective potentials of the natural products are very well known for centuries and are a part of traditional healing. The foremost therapeutic classes include flavones, isoflavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanols, proanthocyanidins, anthocyanidins, chalcones, and aurones. The chalcone or 1,3-diphenyl-2E-propene-1-one represents the class of natural products which are comprised of benzylideneacetophenone function; i.e. two aromatic moieties linked together by an α, ß-unsaturated carbonyl bridge comprising three-carbons. At present, chalcone is one of the privileged scaffolds that can be synthesized in the laboratory to derive different pharmacologically active compounds. This article is the continued form of the previously published work on anti-infective perspectives of chalcones (highlighted till 2015). The current work emphasizes on the discovery process of the chalcone in the period of 2016 to 2017 on malaria, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, filaria, tuberculosis, netamodes, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and miscellaneous conditions. This review comprehensively focuses on the latest progress related with the anti-infective chalcones. The content includes the crucial structural features of chalcone scaffold including structure-activity relationship(s) along with their plausible mechanism of action(s) from the duration Jan 2016 to Dec 2017. This literature will be of prime interest to medicinal chemists in getting ideas and concepts for better rational development of potential anti-infective inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Chalcones/pharmacology , Drug Discovery/trends , Infections/drug therapy , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Chalcones/chemistry , Chalcones/therapeutic use , Humans , Structure-Activity Relationship
14.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 191: 1114-1125, 2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442393

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), also known as peptidyl-dipeptidase A, belongs to the dipeptidyl carboxydipeptidases family has emerged as a potential antiviral drug target against SARS-CoV-2. Most of the ACE2 inhibitors discovered till now are chemical synthesis; suffer from many limitations related to stability and adverse side effects. However, natural, and selective ACE2 inhibitors that possess strong stability and low side effects can be replaced instead of those chemicals' inhibitors. To envisage structurally diverse natural entities as an ACE2 inhibitor with better efficacy, a 3D structure-based-pharmacophore model (SBPM) has been developed and validated by 20 known selective inhibitors with their correspondence 1166 decoy compounds. The validated SBPM has excellent goodness of hit score and good predictive ability, which has been appointed as a query model for further screening of 11,295 natural compounds. The resultant 23 hits compounds with pharmacophore fit score 75.31 to 78.81 were optimized using in-silico ADMET and molecular docking analysis. Four potential natural inhibitory molecules namely D-DOPA (Amb17613565), L-Saccharopine (Amb6600091), D-Phenylalanine (Amb3940754), and L-Mimosine (Amb21855906) have been selected based on their binding affinity (-7.5, -7.1, -7.1, and -7.0 kcal/mol), respectively. Moreover, 250 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations confirmed the structural stability of the ligands within the protein. Additionally, MM/GBSA approach also used to support the stability of molecules to the binding site of the protein that also confirm the stability of the selected four natural compounds. The virtual screening strategy used in this study demonstrated four natural compounds that can be utilized for designing a future class of potential natural ACE2 inhibitor that will block the spike (S) protein dependent entry of SARS-CoV-2 into the host cell.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Biological Products/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/toxicity , Binding Sites , Biological Products/pharmacokinetics , Biological Products/toxicity , Computer Simulation , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship
15.
Cell Rep ; 37(2): 109814, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433045

ABSTRACT

Control of the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is endangered by the emergence of viral variants with increased transmission efficiency, resistance to marketed therapeutic antibodies, and reduced sensitivity to vaccine-induced immunity. Here, we screen B cells from COVID-19 donors and identify P5C3, a highly potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody with picomolar neutralizing activity against all SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) identified to date. Structural characterization of P5C3 Fab in complex with the spike demonstrates a neutralizing activity defined by a large buried surface area, highly overlapping with the receptor-binding domain (RBD) surface necessary for ACE2 interaction. We further demonstrate that P5C3 shows complete prophylactic protection in the SARS-CoV-2-infected hamster challenge model. These results indicate that P5C3 opens exciting perspectives either as a prophylactic agent in immunocompromised individuals with poor response to vaccination or as combination therapy in SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals.


Subject(s)
Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/immunology , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/metabolism , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vaccination
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430892

ABSTRACT

Previous studies reported on the broad-spectrum antiviral function of heparin. Here we investigated the antiviral function of magnesium-modified heparin and found that modified heparin displayed a significantly enhanced antiviral function against human adenovirus (HAdV) in immortalized and primary cells. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses revealed a conformational change of heparin when complexed with magnesium. To broadly explore this discovery, we tested the antiviral function of modified heparin against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and found that the replication of HSV-1 was even further decreased compared to aciclovir. Moreover, we investigated the antiviral effect against the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and measured a 55-fold decreased viral load in the supernatant of infected cells associated with a 38-fold decrease in virus growth. The advantage of our modified heparin is an increased antiviral effect compared to regular heparin.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Heparin/pharmacology , Magnesium Chloride/pharmacology , Acyclovir/pharmacology , Adenoviruses, Human/drug effects , Adenoviruses, Human/physiology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , CHO Cells , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetulus , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Fibroblasts , Heparin/chemistry , Herpesvirus 1, Human/drug effects , Herpesvirus 1, Human/physiology , Humans , Magnesium Chloride/chemistry , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Molecular Structure , Primary Cell Culture , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vero Cells , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
17.
J Med Chem ; 64(19): 14702-14714, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412442

ABSTRACT

Here, we report the synthesis, structure-activity relationship studies, enzyme inhibition, antiviral activity, and X-ray crystallographic studies of 5-chloropyridinyl indole carboxylate derivatives as a potent class of SARS-CoV-2 chymotrypsin-like protease inhibitors. Compound 1 exhibited a SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro inhibitory IC50 value of 250 nM and an antiviral EC50 value of 2.8 µM in VeroE6 cells. Remdesivir, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitor, showed an antiviral EC50 value of 1.2 µM in the same assay. Compound 1 showed comparable antiviral activity with remdesivir in immunocytochemistry assays. Compound 7d with an N-allyl derivative showed the most potent enzyme inhibitory IC50 value of 73 nM. To obtain molecular insight into the binding properties of these molecules, X-ray crystal structures of compounds 2, 7b, and 9d-bound to SARS-CoV 3CLpro were determined, and their binding properties were compared.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Indoles/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Indoles/chemical synthesis , Indoles/metabolism , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/chemical synthesis , Protease Inhibitors/metabolism , Pyridines/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vero Cells
18.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411090

ABSTRACT

The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is an Alphacoronavirus (α-CoV) that causes high mortality in infected piglets, resulting in serious economic losses in the farming industry. Hypericin is a dianthrone compound that has been shown as an antiviral activity on several viruses. Here, we first evaluated the antiviral effect of hypericin in PEDV and found the viral replication and egression were significantly reduced with hypericin post-treatment. As hypericin has been shown in SARS-CoV-2 that it is bound to viral 3CLpro, we thus established a molecular docking between hypericin and PEDV 3CLpro using different software and found hypericin bound to 3CLpro through two pockets. These binding pockets were further verified by another docking between hypericin and PEDV 3CLpro pocket mutants, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay confirmed that hypericin inhibits the PEDV 3CLpro activity. Moreover, the alignments of α-CoV 3CLpro sequences or crystal structure revealed that the pockets mediating hypericin and PEDV 3CLpro binding were highly conserved, especially in transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). We then validated the anti-TGEV effect of hypericin through viral replication and egression. Overall, our results push forward that hypericin was for the first time shown to have an inhibitory effect on PEDV and TGEV by targeting 3CLpro, and it deserves further attention as not only a pan-anti-α-CoV compound but potentially also as a compound of other coronaviral infections.


Subject(s)
Alphacoronavirus/drug effects , Alphacoronavirus/physiology , Anthracenes/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Perylene/analogs & derivatives , Virus Replication/drug effects , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Enzyme Activation/drug effects , Models, Molecular , Perylene/pharmacology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/drug effects , Recombinant Proteins , Structure-Activity Relationship , Swine , Swine Diseases/virology , Vero Cells
19.
Drug Res (Stuttg) ; 71(8): 462-472, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404894

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Replication of SARS-CoV-2 depends on viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp). Remdesivir, the broad-spectrum RdRp inhibitor acts as nucleoside-analogues (NAs). Remdesivir has initially been repurposed as a promising drug against SARS-CoV-2 infection with some health hazards like liver damage, allergic reaction, low blood-pressure, and breathing-shortness, throat-swelling. In comparison, theaflavin-3'-O-gallate (TFMG), the abundant black tea component has gained importance in controlling viral infection. TFMG is a non-toxic, non-invasive, antioxidant, anticancer and antiviral molecule. RESULTS: Here, we analyzed the inhibitory effect of theaflavin-3'-O-gallate on SARS CoV-2 RdRp in comparison with remdesivir by molecular-docking study. TFMG has been shown more potent in terms of lower Atomic-Contact-Energy (ACE) and higher occupancy of surface area; -393.97 Kcal/mol and 771.90 respectively, favoured with lower desolvation-energy; -9.2: Kcal/mol. TFMG forms more rigid electrostatic and H-bond than remdesivir. TFMG showed strong affinity to RNA primer and template and RNA passage-site of RdRp. CONCLUSIONS: TFMG can block the catalytic residue, NTP entry site, cation binding site, nsp7-nsp12 junction with binding energy of -6. 72 Kcal/mol with Ki value of 11.79, and interface domain with binding energy of -7.72 and -6.16 Kcal/mol with Ki value of 2.21 and 30.71 µM. And most importantly, TFMG shows antioxidant/anti-inflammatory/antiviral effect on human studies.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biflavonoids/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Catechin/pharmacology , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Design , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Gallic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Biflavonoids/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Catechin/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Gallic Acid/chemistry , Gallic Acid/pharmacology , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Structure-Activity Relationship
20.
J Mol Model ; 27(7): 206, 2021 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384472

ABSTRACT

The interaction between SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is essential to viral attachment and the subsequent fusion process. Interfering with this event represents an attractive avenue for the development of therapeutics and vaccine development. Here, a hybrid approach of ligand- and structure-based virtual screening techniques were employed to disclose similar analogues of a reported antiviral phytochemical, glycyrrhizin, targeting the blockade of ACE2 interaction with the SARS-CoV-2 Spike. A ligand-based similarity search using a stringent cut-off revealed 40 FDA-approved compounds in DrugBank. These filtered hits were screened against ACE2 using a blind docking approach to determine the natural binding tendency of the compounds with ACE2. Three compounds, deslanoside, digitoxin, and digoxin, were reported to show strong binding with ACE2. These compounds bind at the H1-H2 binding pocket, in a manner similar to that of glycyrrhizin which was used as a control. To achieve consistency in the docking results, docking calculations were performed via two sets of docking software that predicted binding energy as ACE2-Deslanoside (AutoDock, -10.3 kcal/mol and DockThor, -9.53 kcal/mol), ACE2-Digitoxin (AutoDock, -10.6 kcal/mol and DockThor, -8.84 kcal/mol), and ACE2-Digoxin (AutoDock, -10.6 kcal/mol and DockThor, -8.81 kcal/mol). The docking results were validated by running molecular simulations in aqueous solution that demonstrated the stability of ACE2 with no major conformational changes in the ligand original binding mode (~ 2 Å average RMSD). Binding interactions remained quite stable with an increased potential for getting stronger as the simulation proceeded. MMGB/PBSA binding free energies were also estimated and these supported the high stability of the complexes compared to the control (~ -50 kcal/mol net MMGB/PBSA binding energy versus ~ -30 kcal/mol). Collectively, the data demonstrated that the compounds shortlisted in this study might be subjected to experimental evaluation to uncover their real blockade capacity of SARS-CoV-2 host ACE2 receptor.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/pharmacology , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Discovery , Drug Repositioning , Glycyrrhizic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Glycyrrhizic Acid/chemistry , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Structure-Activity Relationship
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